What Did You Learn Today?
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12-12-2017, 08:33 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
    uh huh.

You have to be odd to be #1.
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28-12-2017, 11:41 AM (This post was last modified: 28-12-2017 11:46 AM by Szuchow.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Etymology of word work (praca). Apparently it is descended from Upper Lusatian word próca which meant suffering. It explain a few things.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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21-01-2018, 04:15 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I'm reading the new book Chimpanzees and Human Evolution (2017). The book discusses how, at one time, chimps and gorillas were grouped together as a monophyly, meaning they shared a common ancestor apart from humans. However, genetic research showed humans and chimps are more closely related to each other than they are to gorillas (a common fact). But the one thing that most intrigued me is that, while gorillas, chimps, and humans all share a common ancestor, the phenotypic differences between the former two are a simple matter of time. Gorillas are obviously larger and more robust in certain areas, such as the skull, than chimps. But analyses show that both genera have different growth rates over time. For example, young gorillas have a very similar structure to adult chimpanzees. This difference in allometric expression led to one famous paleontologist to refer to gorillas as "overgrown chimpanzees".

The book itself analyzes genetic, fossil, anatomical, and behavioral evidence to show that chimps are the best model for what our Last Common Ancestor (LCA) looked like. The gorilla's size is a derived trait and not a primitive feature of the LCA.
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05-03-2018, 10:20 AM (This post was last modified: 05-03-2018 10:26 AM by Vera.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I was gonna say that I learnt about crannogs and it was fascinating (Typically a partially or entirely artificial island, usually built in lakes, rivers and estuarine waters of Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Unlike the prehistoric pile dwellings around the Alps that were built on the shores and were inundated only later on, crannogs were built in the water, thus forming artificial islands.

Crannogs were used as dwellings over five millennia, from the European Neolithic Period to as late as the 17th/early 18th century
)

[Image: 248b6bedad62ef115cb74cf6c6b0facf.jpg]

... but that was actually the other day. Today I learnt about something called CUPID showers*: the world's finest collection of urine replacement toys. Designed to deliver clean urine at EXACT body temperature for both men and women. There are also kits called HeWhizz and SheWhizz Blink

Just when I thought I had no innocence left to be killed anymore...

The funniest thing is, I was actually looking for something called Cupid's dance but was checking the weather forecast and since we'll be getting *loads* of *showers* ( Laughat geddid?) this week, my migraine-ridden brain got distracted and my fingers, apparently, typed Cupid shower. You just can't make this up...

The other funniest thing is, the tab for SexxiShowers in my browser is right next to the tab for an asexuality forum I visit occasionally Big Grin

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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07-03-2018, 08:18 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Appalachian Magazine: The West Virginia town that applied for Soviet foreign aid

In 1977, the town of Vulcan, West Virginia had no roads in or out of it, despite being shown on maps. The only way for kids there to go to school was to either cross a rope bridge a coal company had put up, that was missing planks, or they could crawl under railroad cars (which caused one 11 year old to almost lose a leg). The US and WV governments ignored their requests for a real bridge or road.

This being the height of the Cold War, someone had the PR savvy enough to go, "I know how we can get a bridge!" and wrote a letter to the Soviet Embassy in Washington D.C. and to the East German Embassy, formally requesting foreign aid. The USSR dispatched a journalist to broadcast from the town of Vulcan, giving them a nice public relations victory by showing the impoverished town that was in worse shape than most in the Soviet Union, but under the American capitalist system. Soon, calls and letters flooded a local radio station, threatening to blow up any Communist built bridges.

In the end, embarrassed by the whole incident, state officials spent $1.3 million on a bridge.

Need to think of a witty signature.
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09-03-2018, 12:15 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That Lucky Charms cereal was created in 1964 by John Holahan.

"Throughout history, every mystery, ever solved, has turned out to be; Not magic."
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25-04-2018, 04:12 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About the Shigir Idol, "the most ancient wooden sculpture in the world, made during the Mesolithic period and carved around 11,000 years ago."

The idol also shows that large-scale, complex art emerged in more than one place—and that it was the handiwork of hunter-gatherers and not, as was once assumed, of later farming societies. “We have to conclude hunter-gatherers had complex ritual and expression of ideas. Ritual doesn’t start with farming, but with hunter-gatherers,” says Thomas Terberger, an archaeologist at the University of Göttingen in Germany and a co-author of the paper.

"The date places the statue at a time when forests were spreading across a warmer, postglacial Eurasia. As the landscape changed, art did, too, perhaps as a way to help people come to grips with the unfamiliar forest environments they were navigating, says Peter Vang Petersen, an archaeologist at The National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen who was not involved with the study. “Figurative art in the Paleolithic and naturalistic animals painted in caves and carved in rock all stop at the end of the ice age. From then on, you have very stylized patterns that are hard to interpret,” Petersen says. “They’re still hunters, but they had another view of the world.”


"As for the ambit of ‘encrypted code’ on the antediluvian wooden idol, historians have long been puzzled by the inscriptions on the statue. To that end, while the top part clearly comprises a three-dimensional representation of a human’s face, the rectangular profile along the ‘torso’ region is marked by variant geometric patterns. According to some scholars (like Professor Mikhail Zhilin, lead researcher at the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Archaeology), these etchings might have denoted some singular form of passing (spiritual or natural) knowledge, like the story of creation, down the generations – thus possibly entailing a unique communication system developed by the builders themselves.

Simply put, the patterns might have had some symbolic connotations. For example, a straight line could have symbolized a horizon, the defining threshold between sky and land or sky and water. Likewise, squares, circles and crosses might have represented fire and sun (and so on), while zig-zag patterns may have alluded to snakes or lizards (or even danger). Intriguingly enough, the Shigir Idol also boasts six other human faces that are carved along the elongated rectangular profile at certain intervals. But unlike the three-dimensional visage at the top, these carvings showcase two-dimensional depictions of the face."
[Image: shigir-idol-worlds-oldest-wooden-statue_2.jpg]

[Image: shigir-idol-worlds-oldest-wooden-statue_6.jpg]

[Image: shigir-idol-worlds-oldest-wooden-statue_3.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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27-04-2018, 09:31 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
today's Friday.

I know, I'm surprised too.

I was convinced that happened yesterday.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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28-04-2018, 09:08 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About the oak processionary moth. Leaving the name aside, what a fresh horror is this Gasp

"Hairs on the caterpillars can cause fevers and eye and throat irritations, the Forestry Commission said.

Move about in nose-to-tail processions

Often form arrow-headed processions, with one leader and subsequent rows containing several caterpillars abreast

As a caterpillar, each OPM has about 62,000 hairs, which they can eject.

Hairs that fall to the ground can be active for up to five years.

The moths only live for two to three days in July or August."


[spoiler[Image: 07_OPM1-2014100101471242.jpg][/spoiler]

In way less disgusting news, I also learnt about the minipizza batface. Kid you not. That *is* its true name.

"While minipizza batfish already possess a number of other common names, including red batfish, starry handfish, and starry seabat, Wu suggests in a blog post that another, longer name might better capture the species’ true essence. He proposes “minipizza-batfish-with-funny-flippers-that-waddles-more-than-swims-and-sometimes-flattens-itself-to-be-inconspicious-and-at-other-times-stands-on-its-fins-to-gain-(self-perceived)-high-ground-advantage.” Sure, it’s a mouthful, but what more do you need to know?" Big Grin

[Image: 7bf68ad05113ed7b5f397b7d83a63244_extra_large.webp]

[Image: minipizza-batfish-halieutaea-stellata-5-...-650px.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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01-05-2018, 10:51 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Apparently spiders have tiny lil paws! Well, when you look closely, anyway.

Super cute! Still can't get over the fangs tho

[Image: spider-paws-lead.jpg?auto=compress&a...;amp;w=750]

Ignorance is not to be ignored.
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