What Did You Learn Today?
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11-04-2013, 06:53 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Ghost mentioned Dunbar's number:

Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person.[1] Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. It has been proposed to lie between 100 and 230, with a commonly used value of 150.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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11-04-2013, 07:05 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(10-04-2013 05:45 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(10-04-2013 02:50 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Last night I was at a lecture on mating habits of Nurse Sharks. New learnings:

Females help "shield" each other from aggressive/amorous males by coming into the shallows and lying abreast to protect their pectoral fins. The males bite these fins and hold on so thay can copulate.

The males have a helper, called a "blocker" that uses his body to block the mating couple from sliding. Unknown if favor is returned by the other male as yet.

That's interesting. Female primates of various species will also protect each other from unwanted advances.

They researchers have tagged many of these animals and have found that female Nurse Sharks only give birth every second or third year so the same shark is not seen every year during the mating aggregation.

The only female sharks that come to the site are there specifically to mate and yet they use this "shielding" maneouver anyway! The researcher says that only the most determined of the males will get through thus confirming Darwin's observation of fittest.

Once a male has her by the fin other males will help him carry her out to deeper water so he can copulate with her but he will be the only male to do so of the group.

He documented all of this on video by attaching a Go-Pro onto a broom handle and wading into the shallows, you can see many sharks at his feet but totally ignoring him. They had but one thing in mind...Hug

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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11-04-2013, 10:44 PM
What Did You Learn Today?
(11-04-2013 06:53 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Ghost mentioned Dunbar's number:

Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person.[1] Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. It has been proposed to lie between 100 and 230, with a commonly used value of 150.

Interesting. Can you cite for us? I'd be curious if they see this as some hard limit. Seems to me that as future generations are born and raised with the Interwebs this number would "stretch". Are they suggesting this number is a limit of human physiology? Or just what they observed within the sample group?
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12-04-2013, 12:37 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park
The Tsingys are karstic plateaus in which groundwater has undercut the elevated uplands, and has gouged caverns and fissures into the limestone. Because of local conditions, the erosion is patterned vertically as well as horizontally. In several regions on western Madagascar, centering on this National Park and adjacent Nature Reserve, the superposition of vertical and horizontal erosion patterns has created dramatic "forests" of limestone needles. The word tsingy is indigenous to the Malagasy language as a description of the karst badlands of Madagascar. The word can be translated into English as "where one cannot walk barefoot".

[Image: Tsingy_de_Bemaraha_Strict_Nature_Reserve.jpg]

[Image: Tsingy_de_Bemaraha.jpg]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsingy_de_B...ional_Park

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12-04-2013, 12:43 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Socotra
Socotra is considered the jewel of biodiversity in the Arabian Sea. In the 1990s, a team of United Nations biologists conducted a survey of the archipelago’s flora and fauna. They counted nearly 700 endemic species, found nowhere else on earth; only Hawaii and the Galapagos Islands have more impressive numbers. The long geological isolation of the Socotra archipelago and its fierce heat and drought have combined to create a unique and spectacular endemic flora. Botanical field surveys led by the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (part of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh) indicate that 307 out of the 825 (37%) plant species on Socotra are endemic, i.e., they are found nowhere else on Earth.

[Image: Punica_protopunica_085.JPG]

[Image: 345375846_4ef089fb12.jpg]

[Image: Socotra_dragon_tree.JPG]

[Image: aloeperryiherb3.jpg]

[Image: Aloe_polyphylla_1.jpg]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socotra

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12-04-2013, 01:47 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That mushroom looking tree (third picture) looks fucking awesome. I want one of those.
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12-04-2013, 06:00 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
There's an island, Sokland Island, owned by Russia that the Russians are building a two huge plants, an oil plant a LNG plant to hold and process oil and natural gas they're going to extract out of the ground off its coast further north.
There's two HUGE holding tanks for the LNG, and the way they put the roofs on is amazing.
They built the walls, then built the room on the ground (inside the walls), then using nothing but air pressure, pumped air beneath the roof in order to lift it into place. I didn't catch how high but it looked similar to 15-20 story building.
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12-04-2013, 06:32 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About this place: Cradle of Humankind. And subsequently about Mrs. (or Mr., or Miss, or Master) Ples.

[Image: maropeng-03.jpg]

(I love including pictures, so sue me Dodgy )

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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12-04-2013, 06:46 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(12-04-2013 06:00 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  There's an island, Sokland Island, owned by Russia that the Russians are building a two huge plants, an oil plant a LNG plant to hold and process oil and natural gas they're going to extract out of the ground off its coast further north.
There's two HUGE holding tanks for the LNG, and the way they put the roofs on is amazing.
They built the walls, then built the room on the ground (inside the walls), then using nothing but air pressure, pumped air beneath the roof in order to lift it into place. I didn't catch how high but it looked similar to 15-20 story building.

Sakhalin?

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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12-04-2013, 07:03 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(11-04-2013 07:05 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  ...
female sharks that come to the site are there specifically to mate and yet they use this "shielding" maneouver anyway
...

Little minxes, playing hard to get.

Don't try to tell me that 'no' doesn't really mean 'yes'.

Dodgy

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