What Did You Learn Today?
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02-05-2013, 06:02 AM (This post was last modified: 02-05-2013 06:08 AM by Full Circle.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 04:06 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  I wonder if the brain will evolve faster then the skull and man will die off because everyone will be born with huge brains and tiny skulls.
What a fantastic way for man to die off, too smart for our own good..

The real constraint is the width of a woman's pelvis.

"A larger brain requires a larger skull, and thus requires the female to have a wider birth canal for the newborn's larger skull to pass through. But if the female's birth canal grew too wide, her pelvis would be so wide that she would lose the ability to run: still a necessary skill in the dangerous world of 2 million years ago.

The solution to this was to give birth at an early stage of fetal development, before the skull grew too large to pass through the birth canal. This adaptation enabled the human brain to continue to grow, but it imposed a new discipline. The need to care for helpless infants for long periods of time forced humans to become less mobile."

Maybe future humans will be born like Pandas, and most of the growth will happen outside the womb? I understand there is a really informative book called "Of Pandas and People" Angel

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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02-05-2013, 06:02 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About artificial cranial deformation.

I think I wish I hadn't Undecided

"Many cultures have practiced head binding throughout history, even possibly the Neanderthals, and was typically carried out on infants (as their skulls could be easily moulded). To create the effect, wooden boards were applied to the skull with pressure, typically starting at the age of about one month, and then for the next six months."

[Image: 220px-Maya_cranial_deformation.gif]

And I thought that Chinese thing with the feet was plenty horrible....

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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02-05-2013, 06:07 AM (This post was last modified: 02-05-2013 06:24 AM by Full Circle.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 06:02 AM)Vera Wrote:  About artificial cranial deformation.

I think I wish I hadn't Undecided

"Many cultures have practiced head binding throughout history, even possibly the Neanderthals, and was typically carried out on infants (as their skulls could be easily moulded). To create the effect, wooden boards were applied to the skull with pressure, typically starting at the age of about one month, and then for the next six months."

[Image: 220px-Maya_cranial_deformation.gif]

And I thought that Chinese thing with the feet was plenty horrible....

I think it looks aerodynamic, doesn't need one of those bike helmets the riders use in the Tour de France!
[attachment=1363]

*Edit: Glad my 1000th post had something to do with science and absurdity!

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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02-05-2013, 06:25 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 06:07 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  I think it looks aerodynamic, doesn't need one of those bike helmets the riders use in the Tour de France!
Haha. Or not. Dodgy

I think it's beyond horrible.

Being the idiot that I am, I went and had a look at this. At least now even getting down to work sounds appealing. Confused

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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02-05-2013, 06:53 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 06:02 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  The solution to this was to give birth at an early stage of fetal development, before the skull grew too large to pass through the birth canal. This adaptation enabled the human brain to continue to grow, but it imposed a new discipline. The need to care for helpless infants for long periods of time forced humans to become less mobile."

Maybe future humans will be born like Pandas, and most of the growth will happen outside the womb? I understand there is a really informative book called "Of Pandas and People" Angel

It's really already happening as you noted. Our brains aren't really developed until our late teens as it is.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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02-05-2013, 08:00 AM (This post was last modified: 02-05-2013 08:08 AM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(01-05-2013 10:14 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Also the brain case gets progressively larger...and yet here we are defending critical thinking against superstition. Who would have thought?

A larger brain doesn't always mean smarter. Neanderthals actually had larger brains than us. But due to the shape of the skull, it was packaged differently than our own. The following picture shows a Neanderthal brain (top) and human brain (bottom). Notice how theirs is longer, but ours is more globular.

[Image: brains-514x480.jpg]

Some more interesting things about Neanderthals.

1) They were shorter than us. Before I started taking my biological anthropology class, I used to think they towered over us. I guess knowing their brain was bigger had something to do with it.

[Image: neander-human-comp.jpg]

2) Despite being shorter than us, they were much, much stronger. Their skeletons are far more robust. You can see this in the above picture The walls of the bone were actually thicker. They have well defined muscle attachment points on their bones, indicating powerful muscles. Their hands are a good indicator of their strength. First, look at at a human hand.

[Image: sesamoid-bone-hand.jpg]

Now look at the neanderthal hand. Notice how the tufts at the ends of the fingers are massive in comparison. If these two pictures were relatively the same size, you'd notice that the other bones were thicker too.

[Image: shan4hand1.jpg]

3) Their inner ear was smaller than ours, which means they were probably less agile than us. This might explain why we out lived them. This might also explain #5 on this list.

[Image: 47318654.png]

4) Like British longbowmen with the bones of one arm being thicker than the other due to the stress of pulling a bow, many neanderthal have thicker arm bones due to their spear thrusting. Although, one study suggested this might have been from scraping hide.

5) Fossils of neanderthals have a large amount of injuries comparable to that of rodeo riders. Their up close and personal thrusting spear technology may explain this. They essentially got too close to their unwilling prey and got hurt in the process. Early humans used atlatls, a device that extended the length of the arm and allowed for more forceful, and most importantly, longer distance dart-spear throws. Our fossils do not have nearly as many injuries.





6) They cared for their old and infirm. This is best illustrated by the following skull. The person was so old (40) that their teeth fell out and bone grew over the sockets. There is no way they could have survived on their own. Their lack of teeth indicates that someone most likely pre-chewed their food for them.

[Image: la-chapelle-725189.jpg]
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02-05-2013, 09:50 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 06:07 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  *Edit: Glad my 1000th post had something to do with science and absurdity!
You owe me a drink. Or something.

[Image: mojito2.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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02-05-2013, 10:29 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 08:00 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(01-05-2013 10:14 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Also the brain case gets progressively larger...and yet here we are defending critical thinking against superstition. Who would have thought?

A larger brain doesn't always mean smarter. Neanderthals actually had larger brains than us. But due to the shape of the skull, it was packaged differently than our own. The following picture shows a Neanderthal brain (top) and human brain (bottom). Notice how theirs is longer, but ours is more globular.

[Image: brains-514x480.jpg]

Some more interesting things about Neanderthals.

1) They were shorter than us. Before I started taking my biological anthropology class, I used to think they towered over us. I guess knowing their brain was bigger had something to do with it.

[Image: neander-human-comp.jpg]

2) Despite being shorter than us, they were much, much stronger. Their skeletons are far more robust. You can see this in the above picture The walls of the bone were actually thicker. They have well defined muscle attachment points on their bones, indicating powerful muscles. Their hands are a good indicator of their strength. First, look at at a human hand.

[Image: sesamoid-bone-hand.jpg]

Now look at the neanderthal hand. Notice how the tufts at the ends of the fingers are massive in comparison. If these two pictures were relatively the same size, you'd notice that the other bones were thicker too.

[Image: shan4hand1.jpg]

3) Their inner ear was smaller than ours, which means they were probably less agile than us. This might explain why we out lived them. This might also explain #5 on this list.

[Image: 47318654.png]

4) Like British longbowmen with the bones of one arm being thicker than the other due to the stress of pulling a bow, many neanderthal have thicker arm bones due to their spear thrusting. Although, one study suggested this might have been from scraping hide.

5) Fossils of neanderthals have a large amount of injuries comparable to that of rodeo riders. Their up close and personal thrusting spear technology may explain this. They essentially got too close to their unwilling prey and got hurt in the process. Early humans used atlatls, a device that extended the length of the arm and allowed for more forceful, and most importantly, longer distance dart-spear throws. Our fossils do not have nearly as many injuries.





6) They cared for their old and infirm. This is best illustrated by the following skull. The person was so old (40) that their teeth fell out and bone grew over the sockets. There is no way they could have survived on their own. Their lack of teeth indicates that someone most likely pre-chewed their food for them.

[Image: la-chapelle-725189.jpg]

This is awesome shit man! Keep it coming.

We may need to change the thread title to, "what did you learn from ghostexorcist today."!

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02-05-2013, 10:33 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-05-2013 09:50 AM)Vera Wrote:  
(02-05-2013 06:07 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  *Edit: Glad my 1000th post had something to do with science and absurdity!
You owe me a drink. Or something.

[Image: mojito2.jpg]

A mojito or Draque made with Bacardi Superior rum! Done.

Here's to you and the forum Thumbsup

http://www.bacardi.com/us/cocktails/bacardi-mojito

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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02-05-2013, 10:39 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That the mojito used to be called El Draque, after Francis Drake Big Grin

(02-05-2013 10:33 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  A mojito or Draque made with Bacardi Superior rum! Done.

A rum man after my own heart... [Image: th_ALEMON.gif]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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