What Did You Learn Today?
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22-05-2013, 07:21 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(22-05-2013 08:54 AM)Vera Wrote:  Just for you, Stark dear: "Unripe fruit and green parts of the mulberry plant have a white sap that may be toxic, stimulating, or mildly hallucinogenic.." So, when should I expect you? Tongue

(Which also explains why I'm away - they'll be ripening pretty soon, can't afford to waste time.)

I learned that Vera's still lurking. *tackle-hug* Big Grin

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23-05-2013, 04:53 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(22-05-2013 07:21 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  I learned that Vera's still lurking. *tackle-hug* Big Grin
Well, Johnny, darling, it's hardly lurking if one isn't really hiding now, is it? And when I'm haunting a place, I usually make my presence abundantly obvious.

[Image: tumblr_mf17j93Obw1qhr1eso1_500.gif]

And I've seen the carnage that follows tackle (or bear) hugs in your household, so... Confused

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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23-05-2013, 05:04 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I learned Cheapthrillseaker was now a mod.


.... I have yet to figure out why....

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
"Anti-environmentalism is like standing in front of a forest and going 'quick kill them they're coming right for us!'" - Jake Farr-Wharton, The Imaginary Friend Show.
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23-05-2013, 02:31 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Two things:

1) North America was home to roughly 100 different species of early primates during the Eocene (58-65 MYA). Wyoming is a fossil hotbed, apparently.

2) Some experts in the primate fossil record believe the earliest primates arose in Asia and later migrated and prospered in Africa. Their reasoning for this is the fact that the species believed to be ancestral to all primates have never been found in Africa. They've only been found in Europe, Asia, and North America. The European and North American species most likely radiated from Asia.
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23-05-2013, 03:00 PM (This post was last modified: 23-05-2013 05:30 PM by Lienda Bella.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
Confused Never mind, and it won't allow a delete.
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24-05-2013, 08:14 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(23-05-2013 02:31 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Two things:

1) North America was home to roughly 100 different species of early primates during the Eocene (58-65 MYA). Wyoming is a fossil hotbed, apparently.

2) Some experts in the primate fossil record believe the earliest primates arose in Asia and later migrated and prospered in Africa. Their reasoning for this is the fact that the species believed to be ancestral to all primates have never been found in Africa. They've only been found in Europe, Asia, and North America. The European and North American species most likely radiated from Asia.

This article mentions one of the species.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/23455662/ns/te...Z91isq8O8q
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24-05-2013, 08:55 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(24-05-2013 08:14 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(23-05-2013 02:31 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Two things:

1) North America was home to roughly 100 different species of early primates during the Eocene (58-65 MYA). Wyoming is a fossil hotbed, apparently.

2) Some experts in the primate fossil record believe the earliest primates arose in Asia and later migrated and prospered in Africa. Their reasoning for this is the fact that the species believed to be ancestral to all primates have never been found in Africa. They've only been found in Europe, Asia, and North America. The European and North American species most likely radiated from Asia.

This article mentions one of the species.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/23455662/ns/te...Z91isq8O8q

Do ya think it's named for this guy ?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Teilhard_de_Chardin

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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24-05-2013, 02:49 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(24-05-2013 08:55 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Do ya think it's named for this guy ?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Teilhard_de_Chardin

Good eye. This article confirms your suspicions.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/scienc...ef=slogin&
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25-05-2013, 12:29 PM (This post was last modified: 25-05-2013 12:34 PM by Vera.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About Varlam Shalamov. Not as well known as Solzhenitsyn, but his Kolyma Tales are of the calibre of The Gulag Archipelago. I just came across his book and would like to read it, but not sure if I can stomach it. Not anymore Sad

And these are some of the things he learnt during the time spent in a work/concentration camp:

The extraordinary fragility of human nature, of civilization. A human turns into a beast in three weeks of hard work, cold, starvation and beating.

Learned that spite is the last human emotion to survive. Only spite lets the starving man's flesh hold out — and he is indifferent to the rest.

Learned the difference between prison strengthening one's nature, and work camp corrupting his soul.

The easiest, the first victims of moral corruption are party and military men.

Seen what a forcible argument a simple slap could be for an intellectual.

That people distinguish between camp chiefs according to the power of their punches, to their beating enthusiasm.

Beating is almost irresistible as an argument.

Learned that one can live on spite alone.

Learned that one can live on indifference.

Learned why a man keeps on living neither out of hope — there are no hopes at all, nor by will — will is nothing, but only out of the instinct of self-preservation, same as a tree, a rock, an animal.

Seen that women are more honest and selfless than men — there was not a single husband at Kolyma who came after his wife. But wives did come; many did.

The lust for power, for unpunished murder is great — from big shots down to regular police operatives with rifles.

Learned that world should be divided not into good and bad people but into cowards and non-cowards. 95% of cowards are capable of any meanness, lethal meanness, after light threatening.

The discernment of character is useless — I am unable to change my ways for any scum that comes along.

I've learned what power is and what a man with a gun means.

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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25-05-2013, 04:07 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
How to grow my own wheatgrass, how to sprout my own seeds in Mason jars, and how to make my own pickles. ... My brain's 'bout to 'splode. Big Grin

#sigh
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