What Did You Learn Today?
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23-12-2013, 04:28 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(23-12-2013 04:14 PM)morondog Wrote:  Oooo.... chaos... Smile Pretty...

Then I must have one of the prettiest minds there are (not to mention desks) Rolleyes

Randomness is the one comfort I've got, though... Blush

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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26-12-2013, 07:53 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About the Ishango Bone (No. Just no. Dodgy )

"It contained different columns of scratches. One column is a group of three scratches that double to six. Then four that double to eight. And last, ten scratches halve to five. It may be an early math lesson in doubling and halving. Perhaps it's just practice, because other columns have other strange scratches. One column has every prime number between ten and twenty. One column has only odd numbers. And each column adds up to either 48 or 60, both multiples of twelve.

There have been many thoughts on what the Ishango bone is. Some have thought it was an early menstrual calendar. Others have thought that it was a tallying device experimenting with different ways of counting things up. It's possible that it was a math lesson for a child, and that it was meant to be discarded once it was filled up with scratches. It could also have been an early exploration of math - made by some early mathematician looking for patterns in numbers. Alternately, it could be a case of archeologists looking for patterns in coincidence.

As long as coincidence comes in multiples of twelve."

I also learnt about the Antikythera mechanism. Human stupidity (and selfishness, and hatefulness) never cease to amaze me. But neither do human genius (and kindness, and decency). And that's what makes our species so fascinating and the world - so much more interesting, when not seen in black and white only.

"The true genius of the mechanism goes beyond even the complex calculations and craftsmanship of a mechanical calendar. For example, the ancients didn't know that the moon has an elliptical orbit, so they didn't know why it sometimes slowed or sped up as it moved through the zodiac. The mechanism's creator used epicyclic gears, also known as planetary gears, with a "pin-and-slot" mechanism that mimicked this apparent shifting in the moon's movement. This use of epicyclic gears is far ahead of what anyone suspected ancient technology was capable of."

[Image: ku-xlarge.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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26-12-2013, 11:45 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(26-12-2013 07:53 AM)Vera Wrote:  About the Ishango Bone (No. Just no. Dodgy )

"It contained different columns of scratches. One column is a group of three scratches that double to six. Then four that double to eight. And last, ten scratches halve to five. It may be an early math lesson in doubling and halving. Perhaps it's just practice, because other columns have other strange scratches. One column has every prime number between ten and twenty. One column has only odd numbers. And each column adds up to either 48 or 60, both multiples of twelve.

There have been many thoughts on what the Ishango bone is. Some have thought it was an early menstrual calendar. Others have thought that it was a tallying device experimenting with different ways of counting things up. It's possible that it was a math lesson for a child, and that it was meant to be discarded once it was filled up with scratches. It could also have been an early exploration of math - made by some early mathematician looking for patterns in numbers. Alternately, it could be a case of archeologists looking for patterns in coincidence.

As long as coincidence comes in multiples of twelve."

I also learnt about the Antikythera mechanism. Human stupidity (and selfishness, and hatefulness) never cease to amaze me. But neither do human genius (and kindness, and decency). And that's what makes our species so fascinating and the world - so much more interesting, when not seen in black and white only.

"The true genius of the mechanism goes beyond even the complex calculations and craftsmanship of a mechanical calendar. For example, the ancients didn't know that the moon has an elliptical orbit, so they didn't know why it sometimes slowed or sped up as it moved through the zodiac. The mechanism's creator used epicyclic gears, also known as planetary gears, with a "pin-and-slot" mechanism that mimicked this apparent shifting in the moon's movement. This use of epicyclic gears is far ahead of what anyone suspected ancient technology was capable of."

[Image: ku-xlarge.jpg]

Today I learned that I can learn a lot by just reading Vera's posts!

He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! -Brian's mum
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26-12-2013, 02:58 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(26-12-2013 11:45 AM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  Today I learned that I can learn a lot by just reading Vera's posts!
And those are just my public lectures. Can you imagine how much more those that I torture tutor privately get to endure learn. Confused

And 'cause extremes are what I do best (or at least oftenest), let's go from the sublime to the ridiculous...

Today I learnt that gadzooks actually comes from god's hooks or even god's hocks. I would totally start using it... if it wasn't such a dumb-sounding word... And if god's posterior wasn't the last thing I wanted to think of.

It also warmed my heart to no end to discover that cryptography/code has been proudly used for swearing and scribbling rude ditties for a long, long time...

And there it is - first written use of the word fuck... and it was bleeped (or coded) out... Rolleyes

"Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk."

Some things never change.

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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26-12-2013, 10:13 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I learned that camels were originally native to North America.
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28-12-2013, 02:48 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I was in the Antwerp (Belgium) Central Station yesterday afternoon. While there, there was an evacuationalarm and police poured in as everyone had to get out.
Turns out later there was a bombthreat.

I learned:
The Belgian police has no idea how to handle this, there were 12 cops at every entrance (seriously, 2 or 3 and some tape or ribbon would do the trick, have the others do something usefull, every cop in town was there).

People will keep standing in front of the entrance. Don't they realise that people might need to go in or out? Or there might actually be an explosion?

Aspiring optimist
Eternal Pragmatist.
With the uncanny ability to see all sides in every argument.
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28-12-2013, 02:51 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About Solresol. Actually, am kinda still trying to figure it out. And while I'm all for "communicating through singing or playing notes on a musical instrument or using lights the colours of the rainbow: one colour for each syllable", I'm still at a loss to understand how exactly it's supposed to work. (Yeah, I know, I'm a linguist. Never said I was a good one, did I? Dodgy )

Leave it to the French to take an already daft idea (creating an artificial language) and raise it to new heights of silly Rolleyes

Also, whistled languages (well, learnt more about them, that is). Guess what, Mozambique just went up several notches on my "which place of the globe should I infest next?".

Here's a picture, too. Makes everything colourful and pretty, and easy on the eyes.

[Image: SolresolFarben_ecritures.png]

(PS. And yeah, simplifying communication is exactly what we need. Dodgy )

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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28-12-2013, 02:56 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I learned that Steam does not work on my computer. I am not computer savvy enough to figure out why, and I could find no solution through an online search, so I gave up on it.
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30-12-2013, 03:49 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That stars, apparently, not only sneeze, but have sneezing fits. Damned if I'm not picturing a whole lot of stars going achoo all over the Universe at this very instant. [Image: O97Wp3Bfo4dV1ZDbRdBPeMNMAbA.gif]


I also learnt about the... matryomin. And while the theremin just makes you roll your eyes and go "what the fuck", stuffing it into a matryoshka doll (creepy and tacky as it is on its own), takes you into a new and dreadful world.

(Just bear in mind that what has been seen and heard cannot be unseen and unheard. This is the stuff nightmares are made of Blink )




"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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30-12-2013, 09:57 AM (This post was last modified: 30-12-2013 10:05 AM by Cardinal Smurf.)
What Did You Learn Today?
(30-12-2013 03:49 AM)Vera Wrote:  That stars, apparently, not only sneeze, but have sneezing fits. Damned if I'm not picturing a whole lot of stars going achoo all over the Universe at this very instant. [Image: O97Wp3Bfo4dV1ZDbRdBPeMNMAbA.gif]


I also learnt about the... matryomin. And while the theremin just makes you roll your eyes and go "what the fuck", stuffing it into a matryoshka doll (creepy and tacky as it is on its own), takes you into a new and dreadful world.

(Just bear in mind that what has been seen and heard cannot be unseen and unheard. This is the stuff nightmares are made of Blink )




Wow! Only Japan could create something so insane.

I'm looking over Takeuchi-san's site. "Time Slips Away" with theremin, piano, musical saw... and now I have to see what a Matryol is... A whole album of of theremin music. Don't know if I could handle that. But I do actually like the theremin. Hauntingly beautiful if done right (such as in The Day The Earth Stood Still). And oh yes, Midsomer Murders!

EDIT: http://www.mandarinelectron-shop.com/sho...002/order/

He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! -Brian's mum
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