What Religious belief are you?
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05-02-2010, 10:51 PM
 
Question What Religious belief are you?
You know it's come to my attention that there are alot of conflicting views going on because of the topic of religion and subjects it ties into. I'm pretty sure me as a die hard but understanding follower of Christ has a couple times in the past made someone uncomfortable and or otherwise on this site before. So I feel like we should disclose this stuff now so everyone has a list of who's who.

I'm not here to try and convert any of you using this thread (unless you want me to, in which then I will PM u). I just would like to know so I can avoid making anyone uneasy.

Well for me, I am a confirmed Lutheran; though I prefer to follow my own ideals on some manners of how priests teach. For example. a lot of people at my church do not like heavy metal like Slipknot and or otherwise. I on the other hand love Slipknot and all it's awesomeness, yet I don't believe in the lyrics or take it as a hindrance to my faith. That is why I listen to it while others in my church don't.
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09-02-2010, 03:44 AM
 
RE: What Religious belief are you?
I'm cool with people expressing their beliefs, as long as they are not saying that certain people shouldn't be equal to others.
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09-02-2010, 09:53 AM
RE: What Religious belief are you?
Atheist.

"Sometimes it is better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness."
- Terry Pratchett
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09-02-2010, 04:11 PM
 
RE: What Religious belief are you?
I don't believe in religious belief. I think, at its core, it's dishonest. But I do like the idea of people disclosing their convictions. I'd rather know if someone is racist or sexist too. The more information I can get from someone, the better I can determine how much time I'm willing to spend trying to reasonably communicate . I've spent a lifetime trying to get people to answer basic questions about their "faith" and they just seem to be angry with me for asking. And truth be told, I'm not angry--I'm just honestly confused by it. I don't understand why you won't give more time in considering these very ubiquitous questions that have plagued mankind since inquisitive thought first emerged. We've got plenty of time to work on this. Why settle for the easy way out? Most of the really fascinating answers don't even have questions yet. I think we need to spend a few more centuries getting over ourselves before we can even suggest that we know how the universe works and what it's really all about. Am I being unreasonable here? Tell me if you think I am.
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11-02-2010, 03:30 PM
 
RE: What Religious belief are you?
I'm an Atheist (rather recent). I was an Orthodox Christian, but began (seriously) questioning my belief about 15 years ago. Trying to shake the bonds of religion was difficult because I originally felt like I was doing something wrong. It wasn't until about 3 years ago that I finally said "enough is enough", realizing that I was fooling no one and I wasn't being true to myself.
My wife remains an Orthodox Christian, although listening to her 'belief', I think she's more agnostic than anything else. She's open minded whenever I speak about recent news, videos, or thoughts I may have on Atheism. I guess I'm lucky! Smile
(09-02-2010 04:11 PM)Grassharpper Wrote:  I don't believe in religious belief. I think, at its core, it's dishonest. But I do like the idea of people disclosing their convictions. I'd rather know if someone is racist or sexist too. The more information I can get from someone, the better I can determine how much time I'm willing to spend trying to reasonably communicate . I've spent a lifetime trying to get people to answer basic questions about their "faith" and they just seem to be angry with me for asking. And truth be told, I'm not angry--I'm just honestly confused by it. I don't understand why you won't give more time in considering these very ubiquitous questions that have plagued mankind since inquisitive thought first emerged. We've got plenty of time to work on this. Why settle for the easy way out? Most of the really fascinating answers don't even have questions yet. I think we need to spend a few more centuries getting over ourselves before we can even suggest that we know how the universe works and what it's really all about. Am I being unreasonable here? Tell me if you think I am.

I don't think you're being unreasonable. We would be fooling ourselves if we think that everyone would just abandon their belief systems tomorrow (that would be most ideal, but not realistic). I think that, like many cultural beliefs where every generation following tends to abandon old way thinking, religion needs to 'go away' in the same manner. Those of us who are rational, critical thinkers need to teach our children to be rational, critical thinkers. At the same time, we need to teach our children about compassion, love, honoring humankind (even with all of our follies) so they know that the world isn't just a rigid black and white (which, although I love logic, it can come across that way sometimes).
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11-02-2010, 05:54 PM
 
RE: What Religious belief are you?
Good---and you're right---religion and other irrational thinking aren't going away any time soon. It's probably in the DNA of this species. For some reason the ability to isolate a part of the mind for "hibernation" is a key survival mechanism. I still have flights of fantasy imagining a universe of order and meaning. And I do believe that critical thinking could possibly be the savior of mankind, (that belief is constructive)--- if we can get enough people to participate. And therein lies the crux of the problem. When you have so many powerful forces at work trying to corrupt the sensibilities of so many in order to foster the illusion and maintenance of control, the progress of mass "enlightenment" will inch along, with little detection, until a tipping point occurs where rationality just can't be denied. This is only my theory of course and the possibility of a catastrophic backslide is ever looming. Who knows what problems an overpopulated, under-educated, and increasingly environmentally stressed world will lead to? Desperation can bring out the very kind of animal in humans that this civilization has been fighting against for thousands of years. I'm crossing my fingers (so to speak) but this is a very real crisis with unimaginable consequences. That's why I encourage all thoughtful individuals to remain vigilante rather than lose ground to apathy. It's easy to be dismissive and ignore our own stake in the game. This country was founded on the assumption that freedom is all important. Well freedom is a word that can be conceptualized in a whole variety of ways---some of which have already created a massive ecological and cultural dilemma. These kinds of issues are so complex, it boggles the ordinary mind and invites an oversimplification of effective strategies (the kind certain politicians would have you believe). But your point here is key. People need to be taught critical thinking skills. I couldn't tell you what the best way to achieve this is, but talking honestly about it is a good start.
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11-02-2010, 06:26 PM
 
RE: What Religious belief are you?
(11-02-2010 05:54 PM)Grassharpper Wrote:  Good---and you're right---religion and other irrational thinking aren't going away any time soon. It's probably in the DNA of this species. For some reason the ability to isolate a part of the mind for "hibernation" is a key survival mechanism. I still have flights of fantasy imagining a universe of order and meaning. And I do believe that critical thinking could possibly be the savior of mankind, (that belief is constructive)--- if we can get enough people to participate. And therein lies the crux of the problem. When you have so many powerful forces at work trying to corrupt the sensibilities of so many in order to foster the illusion and maintenance of control, the progress of mass "enlightenment" will inch along, with little detection, until a tipping point occurs where rationality just can't be denied. This is only my theory of course and the possibility of a catastrophic backslide is ever looming. Who knows what problems an overpopulated, under-educated, and increasingly environmentally stressed world will lead to? Desperation can bring out the very kind of animal in humans that this civilization has been fighting against for thousands of years. I'm crossing my fingers (so to speak) but this is a very real crisis with unimaginable consequences. That's why I encourage all thoughtful individuals to remain vigilante rather than lose ground to apathy. It's easy to be dismissive and ignore our own stake in the game. This country was founded on the assumption that freedom is all important. Well freedom is a word that can be conceptualized in a whole variety of ways---some of which have already created a massive ecological and cultural dilemma. These kinds of issues are so complex, it boggles the ordinary mind and invites an oversimplification of effective strategies (the kind certain politicians would have you believe). But your point here is key. People need to be taught critical thinking skills. I couldn't tell you what the best way to achieve this is, but talking honestly about it is a good start.

Well, best way to teach critical thinking is not the how, but the who. Our children need to be taught critical thinking. It is with them, and their children following, that religion will finally die out.

One interesting thing I want to point out (kinda my theory, but leveraging off of Richard Dawkin's God Delusion book). In God Delusion, Dawkins talks in one chapter about how religion is probably a meme that has survived for thousands of years, as an end to a mean, as a method for our survival. To me, the meme theory is too complicated (I'm reading it at a layman's level), so I need to read the theory on a more practical basis to judge whether I agree or not.

One thing we can postulate, though...those of us who are the rationalists, the critical thinkers...time will tell if we are the Cromagnon of this generation. If you know anything about early man and Neanderthals, the latter died off because they couldn't compete with the more advanced Cro-magnon man. It would be interesting to look back on this time from 100 years in the future (dare I even say 1000?) and analyze if that was the case. We, the rationalists, have learned to adapt and survive by thinking logically and critically, using brain power to survive, while theists (and I don't mean ALL, but the vast majority who 'don't know any better') are destined to vanish over time (hoping their offspring, if they have any, will be wiser and dump the superstition).

Sorry for the long winded response...I've been dying to get these arguments out of my head! Thank you, TheThinkingAtheist! Smile
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