What caused your de-conversion path ?
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01-05-2014, 07:29 PM
What caused your de-conversion path ?
So many ways people lose their religion, curious as to the most common,

Theism is to believe what other people claim, Atheism is to ask "why should I".
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01-05-2014, 07:30 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
Well, I really hated jewish sunday school (It was three hours!) and also, nothing answered my prayers.
So, I deconverted, and found out it was bullshit all along.

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01-05-2014, 07:32 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
sporehux, there are some illuminating stories here http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...sion-story

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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01-05-2014, 07:34 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
Thinking. Well, that and not attending church (which allowed my mind to drift away from doctrine though I felt scared when I realized I'd question the one and only true church), being around crazy-ass Christians that made me not want to be like them, and watching atheist videos on Youtube. But thinking more or less pulled it all together and made me go down that path.

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01-05-2014, 07:52 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
Exercising the ability to use logic and having knowledge of the bible that wasn't cherry-picked.
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01-05-2014, 07:59 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
Science...

The fact that only modern animals are mentioned in the Bible. The fact that, as a lifelong amateur astronomer, I couldn't reconcile a known distance of 2.5 million Lightyears to the nearest spiral galaxy (Andromeda), with a 6,000 year old universe.

For a while I pretty much ignored Genesis, and regarded it as mythology...

But it just seemed as if the religious argument was in full retreat from the unstoppable advance of science...

And then there's simply the complete and total absence of any evidence of any kind.

That, plus a healthy dose of Christopher Hitchens, equals atheism...

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01-05-2014, 08:19 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
I was working on a poll , but it was either too tree or too forest.
Accidentally posted this op while driving.
so ill roll with it.

Many Atheists (most)I come across are very much alone, as in they are the only Atheist in a family/friend unit of hundreds.
It takes courage to fight off the easy out of conforming to a groups belief or just faking it.

The de-conversion reasoning over powers the easy/lazy conformity option.
People see it as rebellious behaviour, but its really having the intellectual honesty to stand your ground on what you feel is correct, based on empirical reality.

Theism is to believe what other people claim, Atheism is to ask "why should I".
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01-05-2014, 10:37 PM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
(01-05-2014 08:19 PM)sporehux Wrote:  I was working on a poll , but it was either too tree or too forest.
Accidentally posted this op while driving.
so ill roll with it.

Many Atheists (most)I come across are very much alone, as in they are the only Atheist in a family/friend unit of hundreds.
It takes courage to fight off the easy out of conforming to a groups belief or just faking it.

The de-conversion reasoning over powers the easy/lazy conformity option.
People see it as rebellious behaviour, but its really having the intellectual honesty to stand your ground on what you feel is correct, based on empirical reality.

I think that depends on where you are in the world.

Here in the UK, without using polls, its hard to determine the proportion of believers to non believers... But then we Brits are not exactly ones to talk openly about our beliefs in public.

Public displays of religiosity seem more out of place than atheism here... At least, that's how it seems to me.

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02-05-2014, 06:03 AM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
It wasn't any one thing for me, and it was a several year long process.
  • In my early 20s, I was exposed to dissenting view points for the first time. I was a fairly good apologist at that point, and didn't relent on many points; however, I did recognize the unfairness of people being born in non-Christian countries being expected to convert before they died.
  • Around this time, it was when I first noted that "I didn't feel it anymore". I couldn't really articulate on it, but it may have been my first real doubts. Those were quickly swept under the rug. Hell, I was an elder at my church for five years after this point.
  • Around the time my wife was pregnant with my first daughter (late 20s), I remembered thinking "If I'm going to teach her about religion, I need to know that I'm really fine with it myself". This is when I started to think about my doubts on a daily basis. This was the beginning of me being depressed on and off nearly every day.
  • I went thought a two-year process of trying to convince myself that I still believed, trying to make myself believe when I knew I didn't, and trying to come up with some very weird apologetics to get it to make sense.
  • I could no longer see an all loving god in this world. When I tried to read the Bible for assurance... that made things worse. There wasn't an all loving god in there, either.
  • I got to a point when I realized that all of my apologetics was just me making things up, and why should I follow an obviously made-up religion?
  • I started to get mad at God. Both for testing me like this and also for letting the world be like this if he didn't have to.
  • I finally got to the point where I no longer believed, and I couldn't admit it to myself for six months because I was afraid I might be wrong and go to hell.
  • Eventually, I realized that I'd never worried about going to Muslim hell that whole time I was Christian, so why am I worried about Christian hell now that I'm not Christian? I finally let it all go, and things started to get much better.

TL;DR: It wasn't any one thing, and it took me years. In the end, it stopped making sense enough that it was easier to let go than it was to keep trying to explain everything away.
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02-05-2014, 06:33 AM
RE: What caused your de-conversion path ?
I was raised in a very cathoilc family. When I went to college I stepped away from the church for a few years. I got involved with the methodist church for a few years until I met my wife. She only would go to a catholic church so I switched back. All that time I was studying the beliefs of both the catholic and methodist churchs. None of it ever fully clicked so I got more involved and started playing bass in the church choir where ever I was attending in an attempt to get connected. The more I studied and stayed involved the less and less it made any sense. I stopped actively participating in mass years ago, but continued to attend and play in the choir for two reason. The first was I did not want my wife to catch any crap from her church friends. She was super involved and I did not want my decisions to cause her grief. The second was the choir was full of good musicians and I enjoyed playing music with them. When we moved I was able to drop those with out any negative impact to my wife. I got comfortable calling myself an athiest a year or so ago, but looking back it has been much longer since I stopped believing in god.
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