What does it mean to change your goals?
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02-12-2015, 07:06 AM
RE: What does it mean to change your goals?
You change goals at half time.

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02-12-2015, 11:26 AM (This post was last modified: 02-12-2015 11:35 AM by GenesisNemesis.)
RE: What does it mean to change your goals?
(22-10-2015 12:51 PM)tear151 Wrote:  So, when a human changes their mind, what is the base aim of humans then? What is it that we change our mind in relation to, when we stop believing in God for example, what A does Belief not satisfy that non-belief doesn't?

Most of the time it's because we no longer find meaning in our previous goals. The base aim is to find some kind of meaning.

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05-12-2015, 09:44 AM
RE: What does it mean to change your goals?
(22-10-2015 12:51 PM)tear151 Wrote:  It is a proven mathematical theorem that a strict goal achieving agents cannot change it's goal by itself, for an example an ai whose primary purpose is to collect the largest ammounts of stamps possible cannot suddenly decide it wants to take over the world, but, if it's goal was something more abstract and collecting stamps was an objective it computed would achieve that goal it could change that sub goal if it became more convinient.

Formally

Goal-orientated agent has aim A

Whilst pursuing A it cannot change it's aim to say, objective Z because this would not assist in achieving A, however, if A1 was an objective that the agent thought would help achieve A and A2 could be deomonstrated to acheive A better than A1 the goal orientated agent would switch to attempting to achieve A2.

So, when a human changes their mind, what is the base aim of humans then? What is it that we change our mind in relation to, when we stop believing in God for example, what A does Belief not satisfy that non-belief doesn't?

Further, though the aim of an agent can't be changed by the agent itself, it can be changed by external forces changing the agent. So as a human is externally physically and chemically alterable, what does it say about us if we

A. Cannot change "primary goals" consciously and

B. Can have our most basic desires changed by external processes

I think it is a fundamental error to compare Human beings to a computer program. What it means to change goals is that we have made a change in the hierarchical structure of our values. We have come to value something more than we used to and now it has moved upwards in our values hierarchy and replaced older values. A perfect example is the fact that I have recently fallen in love with bicycling. I always used to like it but I went through a period where my bikes sat gathering dust for years. I had other priorities at the time. But last year I started mountain biking again and became addicted. Now my goals have changed. I now try to spend every hour possible riding my bike through the mountains and desert around my home. It's a huge stress reliever and attitude adjuster. I'm getting a fat bike so I can ride through the winter and not loose the conditioning I've achieved over the spring, summer and fall. It has become one of my top values. My goals have changed. It means I don't do some things that I used to like to do because now mountain biking takes precedence over those activities. If you think that some external consciousness programmed me to like mountain biking, you'll have to present a pretty good argument for this and one that does not violate the primacy of existence. Good luck, you'll need it.

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