What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
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02-09-2013, 05:48 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
(02-09-2013 03:04 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(02-09-2013 02:24 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  Enough, personally. Professionally, I don't even exist. I allowed my self to know one thing - that I love my Gwynnies - and the I part seems to have become secondary to the Gwynnies part. Huh

hahahahahaha ... You Gwynnie's bitch now. Laughat ... hahahahahaha

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02-09-2013, 06:43 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
Quote:and whether documented eyewhitness accounts constitues as sound evidence.

Ever served on jury duty and watched a defense lawyer cross-examine an eye-witness? It isn't pretty. Most people are about as observant as a loaf of bread.
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02-09-2013, 07:23 PM
Re: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
...I think he was confused and meant Socrates. The only existing documents of Socrates existence are written by Plato and Xenophon and from plays.

Some believe he may be fictional.. It doesn't matter, if that's true, it's just more genius out of Plato for their differences in discourse in various writings.

Aristotle though published numerous texts on rhetoric and other topics. There's contemporary Sophists writings from the time who shared opposite views of Aristotle, and other cultural documents mentioning him as afterall, he was Alexander the greats mentor.

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02-09-2013, 09:14 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
I just watched a video where hitchens described the existence of socrates as being unquestionable. Or along those lines anyways. But thank you all for the feedback. I have learned a great deal since joining this forum.

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03-09-2013, 08:14 AM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
You'll find plenty of "evidence" in these frequently cited works:
  • Ackrill, J., Categories and De Interpretatione, Translated with notes, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1963.
  • Annas, J., Metaphysics Books M and N, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • Balme, D., De Partibus Animalium I and De Generatione Animalium I, (with passages from Book II. 1–3), Translated with an introduction and notes, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • Barnes, J., ed. The Complete Works of Aristotle, Volumes I and II, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984.
  • Barnes, J., Posterior Analytics, Second Edition, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.
  • Bostock, D., Metaphysics Books Z and H, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.
  • Charlton, W., Physics Books I and II, Translated with introduction, commentary, Note on Recent Work, and revised Bibliography, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984.
  • Furley, D. J., ‘What Kind of Cause is Aristotle's Final Cause?,’ in M. Frede and G. Stricker (eds.), Rationality in Greek Thought, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999, pp. 59–79
  • Gill, M. L., ‘Aristotle's Metaphysics Reconsidered,’ Journal of the History of Philosophy, 43 (2005): 223–251
  • Graham, D., Physics, Book VIII, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford Univesity Press, 1999.
  • Hussey, E., Physics Books III and IV, Translated with an introduction and notes, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.
  • Irwin, T. and Fine., G., Aristotle: Selections, Translated with Introduction, Notes, and Glossary, Indianapolis: Hackett, 1995.
  • Keyt, D., Politics, Books V and VI Animals, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  • Kirwan, C., Metaphysics: Books gamma, delta, and epsilon, Second Edition, Translated with notes, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
  • Kraut, R., Politics Books VII and VIII, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Lennox., J, On the Parts of Animals, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • Madigan, A., Aristotle: Metaphysics Books B and K 1–2, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  • Makin, S., Metaphysics Theta, Translated with an introduction and commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  • Pakaluk, M., Nicomachean Ethics, Books VIII and IX, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  • Robinson, R., Politics: Books III and IV, Translated with a commentary by Richard Robinson; with a supplementary essay by David Keyt, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.
  • Saunders, T., Politics: Books I and II, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.
  • Shields, Christopher, De Anima, Translated with an introduction and commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
  • Smith, R., Topics Books I and VIII, With excerpts from related texts, , Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.
  • Taylor, C., Nicomachean Ethics, Books II-IV, Translated with an introduction and commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  • Williams, C., De Generatione et Corruptione, Translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.
  • Woods, M., Eudemian Ethics Books I, II, and VIII, Second Edition, Edited, and translated with a commentary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
— And in these journals:
  • Ancient Philosophy
  • Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie
  • Australasian Journal of Philosophy
  • American Philosophical Quarterly
  • Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
  • Canadian Journal of Philosophy
  • History and Philosophy of Logic
  • History of Philosophy Quarterly
  • Journal of the History of Philosophy
  • Journal of Hellenic Studies
  • Journal of Philosophy
  • Journal of Philosophical Logic
  • Journal of Symbolic Logic
  • Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic
  • The New Scholasticism
  • Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy
  • Aristotelian Society Proceedings
  • Aristotelian Society Proceedings, Supplementary Volume
  • Philosophical Quarterly
  • Philosophical Review
  • Pacific Philosophical Quarterly
  • Philosophy and Phenomenological Research
  • Philosophical Studies
  • Philosophy of Science
  • Review of Metaphysics
  • Southern Journal of Philosophy

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03-09-2013, 02:04 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
Is anyone claiming that Aristotle or Socrates was born of a virgin, performed miracles and rose from the dead?

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11-01-2016, 01:41 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
(03-09-2013 02:04 PM)f stop Wrote:  Is anyone claiming that Aristotle or Socrates was born of a virgin, performed miracles and rose from the dead?

I was just about to make a point regarding this.

There is no benefit in somebody making up Aristotle as a character in history. We can then safely assume that he did exist, considering the vast amount of evidence that he did. Also, unlike people such as Socrates, Homer etc, we can determine whether or not a body of works was likely by the same person each piece is claimed to be by through examining lots of different aspects. For example, the final book of The Odyssey is very very unlike the rest of the work in literary form. Although poetry was an oral art form during the time Homer was meant to exist, there are other possible explanations for this such as Homer editing his Magnum Opus later on in his life when his style could have changed. This is just another example of situations that place doubt in the minds of historians and bring about some of the fantastic debates there are in academia. The classics are so exciting for this reason, the enigma which is the classical world is just brilliant.

There are a tonne of Greek historians, some even living at the same time of Aristotle, who have written similar things about him. Many historical events we also know to be true also seem to go along with the story of Aristotle and his becoming of the tutor of Alexander.

As a historian, I have experienced this discussion on the topic of almost every important person in the classical world. Some people even question whether or not that little Macedonian Alexander existed.

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11-01-2016, 01:46 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
(11-01-2016 01:41 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  
(03-09-2013 02:04 PM)f stop Wrote:  Is anyone claiming that Aristotle or Socrates was born of a virgin, performed miracles and rose from the dead?

I was just about to make a point regarding this.

There is no benefit in somebody making up Aristotle as a character in history. We can then safely assume that he did exist, considering the vast amount of evidence that he did. Also, unlike people such as Socrates, Homer etc, we can determine whether or not a body of works was likely by the same person each piece is claimed to be by through examining lots of different aspects. For example, the final book of The Odyssey is very very unlike the rest of the work in literary form. Although poetry was an oral art form during the time Homer was meant to exist, there are other possible explanations for this such as Homer editing his Magnum Opus later on in his life when his style could have changed. This is just another example of situations that place doubt in the minds of historians and bring about some of the fantastic debates there are in academia. The classics are so exciting for this reason, the enigma which is the classical world is just brilliant.

There are a tonne of Greek historians, some even living at the same time of Aristotle, who have written similar things about him. Many historical events we also know to be true also seem to go along with the story of Aristotle and his becoming of the tutor of Alexander.

As a historian, I have experienced this discussion on the topic of almost every important person in the classical world. Some people even question whether or not that little Macedonian Alexander existed.

N-N-N-N-Necropost!

Although to be fair it's a recurring topic, as an aside at the very least.

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11-01-2016, 01:49 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
(11-01-2016 01:46 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(11-01-2016 01:41 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  I was just about to make a point regarding this.

There is no benefit in somebody making up Aristotle as a character in history. We can then safely assume that he did exist, considering the vast amount of evidence that he did. Also, unlike people such as Socrates, Homer etc, we can determine whether or not a body of works was likely by the same person each piece is claimed to be by through examining lots of different aspects. For example, the final book of The Odyssey is very very unlike the rest of the work in literary form. Although poetry was an oral art form during the time Homer was meant to exist, there are other possible explanations for this such as Homer editing his Magnum Opus later on in his life when his style could have changed. This is just another example of situations that place doubt in the minds of historians and bring about some of the fantastic debates there are in academia. The classics are so exciting for this reason, the enigma which is the classical world is just brilliant.

There are a tonne of Greek historians, some even living at the same time of Aristotle, who have written similar things about him. Many historical events we also know to be true also seem to go along with the story of Aristotle and his becoming of the tutor of Alexander.

As a historian, I have experienced this discussion on the topic of almost every important person in the classical world. Some people even question whether or not that little Macedonian Alexander existed.

N-N-N-N-Necropost!

Although to be fair it's a recurring topic, as an aside at the very least.

Haha I'm writing a piece on Aristotle and gave it a search. Totally forgot that some preads will have been a while back.

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11-01-2016, 03:08 PM
RE: What evidence do we have that Aristotle existed?
(02-09-2013 11:50 AM)sequoyah Wrote:  I was just presented with this argument. All i can find as far as evidence goes is writtings, eye whitness accouts etc. What say you on this matter?

Asking what evidence there is for Aristotle's existence is not an argument. It's a question. Big difference. I would respond that no matter how many eye witness accounts and writings there are, I wouldn't believe they were true if Aristotle was purported to be the son of a god, have walked on unfrozen water, have raised the dead, have turned water into wine, have healed the sick and blind by an act of conscious will, have resisted the temptations of the Devil,to have been born of a virgin, have died and been resurrected. Because, these things are all impossible in principle, while being an ancient philosopher is not. He may not have existed or his persona may be greatly inflated. It's his ideas that matter, at least the good ones.

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