What is/was your degree(s) in?
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25-11-2015, 08:22 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
Self edumacated Einstein

I've dabbled in a few different subjects and made a few half assed attempts at college, but always found it to be bringing me further away from my goals rather than towards them.

I spent two years going to various electronics schools in the military, namely satellite communications, mobile high frequency communications systems, electronic security systems, shit like that.

When I got out of my first round of military service I went to China and enrolled in a Chinese Language and Culture degree program, but found the pace excruciatingly slow. It was cheaper to just travel and live from cheap hotels than it was to go to school, and I learned Chinese exponentially faster that way. I would also venture to guess my understanding of Chinese culture is better than someone who spends most of their time buried in books in an international dorm as opposed to being out and actually living within that culture.

My next venture was an attempt at a degree in international business. Fortunately I landed what I thought would be my ideal job before I even finished my first week of classes, discovered that 98% of being a factory representative involved sitting in front of a computer fucking around with Excel and answering emails, and within two weeks dropped my classes and quit the job before it had the chance to make me suicidal.

After going back into the military on a weekend warrior basis, I completed my PSP (physical security professional) certification with ASIS International (American society for industrial security), which among security professionals is generally seen as being as valuable, if not more so due to the experience prerequisite and the continued education required to maintain it, on a resume as a degree in security management.

On my own I've screwed around with computational linguistics out of personal interest and explosives engineering because it's somewhat relevant both in my civilian career doing mine security and in my military job, which occasionally involves demolitions, albeit in a different context than discussed in the textbooks I've read.

'Murican Canadian
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25-11-2015, 08:25 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
I have a BS in Electrical & Computer Engineering. Considering going back for an MBA but I am waiting on my wife to finish her PhD first. If I had unlimited time and money, I'd go get a degree in physics. I doubt I'd use it, but it would be fun!

I just wanted to let you know that I love you even though you aren't naked right now. Heart
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25-11-2015, 08:30 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
(25-11-2015 08:22 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Self edumacated Einstein

I've dabbled in a few different subjects and made a few half assed attempts at college, but always found it to be bringing me further away from my goals rather than towards them.

I spent two years going to various electronics schools in the military, namely satellite communications, mobile high frequency communications systems, electronic security systems, shit like that.

When I got out of my first round of military service I went to China and enrolled in a Chinese Language and Culture degree program, but found the pace excruciatingly slow. It was cheaper to just travel and live from cheap hotels than it was to go to school, and I learned Chinese exponentially faster that way. I would also venture to guess my understanding of Chinese culture is better than someone who spends most of their time buried in books in an international dorm as opposed to being out and actually living within that culture.

My next venture was an attempt at a degree in international business. Fortunately I landed what I thought would be my ideal job before I even finished my first week of classes, discovered that 98% of being a factory representative involved sitting in front of a computer fucking around with Excel and answering emails, and within two weeks dropped my classes and quit the job before it had the chance to make me suicidal.

After going back into the military on a weekend warrior basis, I completed my PSP (physical security professional) certification with ASIS International (American society for industrial security), which among security professionals is generally seen as being as valuable, if not more so due to the experience prerequisite and the continued education required to maintain it, on a resume as a degree in security management.

On my own I've screwed around with computational linguistics out of personal interest and explosives engineering because it's somewhat relevant both in my civilian career doing mine security and in my military job, which occasionally involves demolitions, albeit in a different context than discussed in the textbooks I've read.

I really enjoy reading about your life! You should write a personal memoir and post it somewhere so we can all read it. Seriously.

I just wanted to let you know that I love you even though you aren't naked right now. Heart
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25-11-2015, 08:47 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
(25-11-2015 08:30 AM)TurkeyBurner Wrote:  
(25-11-2015 08:22 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Self edumacated Einstein

I've dabbled in a few different subjects and made a few half assed attempts at college, but always found it to be bringing me further away from my goals rather than towards them.

I spent two years going to various electronics schools in the military, namely satellite communications, mobile high frequency communications systems, electronic security systems, shit like that.

When I got out of my first round of military service I went to China and enrolled in a Chinese Language and Culture degree program, but found the pace excruciatingly slow. It was cheaper to just travel and live from cheap hotels than it was to go to school, and I learned Chinese exponentially faster that way. I would also venture to guess my understanding of Chinese culture is better than someone who spends most of their time buried in books in an international dorm as opposed to being out and actually living within that culture.

My next venture was an attempt at a degree in international business. Fortunately I landed what I thought would be my ideal job before I even finished my first week of classes, discovered that 98% of being a factory representative involved sitting in front of a computer fucking around with Excel and answering emails, and within two weeks dropped my classes and quit the job before it had the chance to make me suicidal.

After going back into the military on a weekend warrior basis, I completed my PSP (physical security professional) certification with ASIS International (American society for industrial security), which among security professionals is generally seen as being as valuable, if not more so due to the experience prerequisite and the continued education required to maintain it, on a resume as a degree in security management.

On my own I've screwed around with computational linguistics out of personal interest and explosives engineering because it's somewhat relevant both in my civilian career doing mine security and in my military job, which occasionally involves demolitions, albeit in a different context than discussed in the textbooks I've read.

I really enjoy reading about your life! You should write a personal memoir and post it somewhere so we can all read it. Seriously.

Agreed. I've said the same thing Thumbsup

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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25-11-2015, 08:50 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
B.S in Chemistry
Ph.D. in Chemistry

It is always the conversation stopper at a party. Q: What do you do for a living? A: I am a chemist. Response: silence. If the person is interesting and I wouldn't mind keeping on talking to him or her, I say I am a college professor.
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25-11-2015, 08:51 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
(25-11-2015 07:44 AM)Brian37 Wrote:  
(25-11-2015 07:32 AM)Popeyes Pappy Wrote:  I've got a BS in Management of Technology with a Minor in Information Systems Management and a MBA. I was 29 before I even started college and worked full time (12 hour shifts 7 days a week if the shuttle was up) the entire time, but still managed to get my undergraduate and graduate degree in 6 years completing the MBA in 97. As a result I have very little sympathy for younger people who go to school without working complaining about how much work it is.

"Hard work" is a bullshit term. If everything was supposed to be "hard" we'd stick to walking, not move up to horses and buggies, then cars. If work was supposed to be "hard" we'd stick to the pony express and not move to e-mail and text messages.

"Hard" in what context? Business owners don't work hard like those who work under them. Even the ones who are in the trenches, not the office dwellers. First off, the workers constitute the majority of the literal energy that ends up making them money. Secondly, even if they sweat along side the worker, they are not burdened with the stress of fear of being fired or fear of paying their bills.

Humans are not machines. Humans are not born to be objects like tools or numbers on a page for others to exploit. I don't like the term "hard work", I like the word "productivity". I think you get more out of workers when you don't hire and fire them like baseball trading cards. I think you can get more productivity out of them when they have livable wages, and you give them the material they need, and have enough people on staff, and give them stable work so they can have a life outside the job.

I think right now in this point in history, workers WORLDWIDE have every right to bitch because the world's rich don't give a fuck. If they would make it easier on workers they would find there would be more global stability.

It is not how hard you work, it is how smart you work.

Brian, I'm not sure why you quoted me before gong off on your little rant because I didn't touch on any of the subjects you, hit but I disagree with some of what you have to say. It sounds like you believe people who aren't literally in the trenches (as in digging a ditch by hand) don't work hard. If so it's bullshit.

For an example I give you our procurement clerk. The last week of September one of our government contracting officers had about $300K of year end money and a long list of things they needed, but had been putting off until they knew they could afford them. They result was that on September 28 Ashley received 42 purchase requests. Almost 300 separate line items ranging from the iPads the line people use to keep up with inventory to the forklifts they use to move stuff around with. She had to check each PR for accuracy, get a minimum of 3 quotes for each item, compare the quotes, select vendors and issue over 100 purchase orders all before September 30. She had to do all this while keeping up with the normal PR's she processes every day. She worked her ass off putting in 48 hours over three days.

As far as hiring and firing goes sometimes it is the nature of the beast. I do government contract work. I hire people at the start of a new contract and lay them off when the contract ends. I don't have much choice about that because when the contract is over I don't have anything for them to do. No revenue coming in means nothing to pay people with.

That doesn't mean I'm not looking for other things we as a company can do that will keep me, Rae, Deveda and Jennifer employed after our contract at CCAD is over at the end of March. That's going to be harder to do for Jennifer than the other three of us. Jen is a safety officer. That means I am going to need a job that requires a safety officer in order to keep her employed. I'm also going to need a job in the Corpus Christi area because unlike the rest of us who are willing to go where the work is Jen is not.

When I find something that looks promising I personally have to do additional work on top of everything else I'm already doing in order for us to compete against other companies that want the same work. It's not unusual for me to put in a few 60 to 80 hours weeks during the process because I essentially have two jobs during those periods. One managing my existing contracts and another trying to get new ones.

One more thing about companies and exploited workers. Yes there are companies out there that exploit their workers. They could pay more, provide better benefits and in general treat their employees better than they do. All companies do not fall into that category though. I work for a native american tribally owned company. This company doesn't exist for the benefit of its employees. It exists for the benefit of the tiny little Indian tribe that owns it. That doesn't mean we treat our employees like shit at every opponency. It does mean we aren't going to keep people on the payroll who don't have anything to do because they would be getting paid for doing nothing out of a pot of money that could otherwise be used for scholarship for one of the young tribal members to go to college.

Save a life. Adopt a greyhound.

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25-11-2015, 08:52 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
B.S. Journalism

Check out my now-defunct atheism blog. It's just a blog, no ads, no revenue, no gods.
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25-11-2015, 08:58 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
Bachelor's in Liberal Arts with an emphasis on Literature and Sociology. Master's in Gerontology.

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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25-11-2015, 08:58 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
Hons Bachelor's Applied Science (specializing in materials science and non-destructive testing)
Hons Bachelor of Arts (Translation, French-to-English)

Yes, two completely unrelated degrees, separated by 15 years.

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25-11-2015, 09:35 AM
RE: What is/was your degree(s) in?
High school drop out

Joined the Navy at 17yo, took my GED test while in the Navy, missed 6 questions and earned a Honorary high school diploma from State of Florida Board of Education

Then at the age of 35 went through the police academy, and started college nights and weekends at a community college.

Transferred into Saint Leo University, and got my Associates in Religious Studies with spec in Christianity.

Rolled into their Criminal Justice program, and finished my Bachelors of Arts in Criminal Justice with spec in Homeland Security (3.945 GPA)

I am in the Master's program getting my MS in Criminal Justice with spec in Critical Incident Management. I have two classes left until my thesis.

My smoking hot wife has been in school full time for the last 6 years, she has her Associates in Legal Administration, BA in Criminal Justice with spec in Homeland Security and just completed her thesis this week for her MS in Criminal Justice with spec in Critical Incident Management.

What I have learned....college is a joke and is no indication of intelligence or capability. It is an indication of time and money spent. The certificates look pretty on the wall of our office and bring credibility to the job market, but you really learn very little. Life experience is the true university of knowledge. We worked our asses off to each get our masters before I retire in April so we can roll into successful careers post navy.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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