What kind of mental disorder is this?
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29-03-2012, 08:31 PM
RE: What kind of mental disorder is this?
Wow, he has a lot to deal with and so does the family but there are ways to work with both issues. Read what you can and find a doctor or therapist with knowledge in those things to guide you toward help. I am certain there are also support groups to lead you to resources.

See here they are, the bruises, some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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30-03-2012, 07:19 AM (This post was last modified: 30-03-2012 08:42 AM by Luminon.)
RE: What kind of mental disorder is this?
(29-03-2012 05:59 PM)Dom Wrote:  I posted this once before:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7lQa3q_OAk
Well thank you very much, that is a very valuable information. So it's called Asperger's, you say. Explains a lot. I wouldn't flat out say that I have this Asperger's syndrome, not in a great extent (many pathologic signs don't fit on me) and I did much of work on social skills. But I'd say that due to neuroplasticity it is possible to move towards it on the spectrum and hopefully away from it. And I was near it on the spectrum to begin with, that much I'm sure.

EDIT: now I'm almost sure about that. But fortunately I seem to be on the highly functional end of the spectrum. Many situations which people describe on the net are exactly repeated in my life. For one typical example, on my trainee-ship in France I was to cooperate with a local town office and one woman was in charge of me. I waited patiently when I had to wait somewhere, but she interpreted it (and my face and whole body language) as stand-offish, arrogant and hyper-intelligent behavior and complained to the teacher about my rudeness. I was totally surprised when I heard of that, the teacher told me, because she knows me better.

My psych friend says it's simply an over-adaptation of the brain, but she works with adults or young adults, not children.
My personal opinion as an esotericist is, that this over-adaptation takes several past lives to get one-sidedly specialized like that. Lots of cave-dwelling and tome-illuminating.

(29-03-2012 08:18 PM)Anjele Wrote:  My nephew has Aspergers and a former boss had a son that had a very strong case of it. There is a lot of info online about it. My nephew is pretty high functioning.

When my nephew was very young he started showing signs of becoming fixated on certain topics, he had to know everything about it. As young as two he knew the names of many dinosaurs, as well as facts about them. If you research you find a description of "The Little Professor".
LOL Big Grin Guess what I knew when I was little. Guess how I was sometimes called. Damn, if I knew back then I'd have a wonderful explanation to my crudely but nonetheless genuinely concerned classmates.
Any parent should watch out if his child starts displaying an excessive interest in prehistoric reptiles. Plastic figurines are OK, but books should raise a concern and reciting latin names, that's a cause for alarm! Tongue
(29-03-2012 08:18 PM)Anjele Wrote:  He still isn't good with social interaction and is much more comfortable with facts, he will try to turn any conversation back to facts. He is smart and knows a lot with an almost photographic memory but just can't seem to use that information in any conversational manner.

My old boss' son had more of the physical tics and made repetitive noises and was prone to eating one type of food for long periods of time.

Aspergers is within the autism spectrum...at the less extreme end but there are many variations in the effects and behaviors that go with it depending on the extent of the syndrome.

Mainly, they can be highly intelligent but often have to be worked with quite extensively to learn social skills. There are often struggles in that they don't read facial expressions and tone of voice, they are very black and white and quite focused on their current obsession.
Very well, thanks for the info. Learning social skills for aspies. Gotta google it up.

One way to understand me is to go through this basic child test.

My answer would be, "Sally would search for the ball in the basket, obviously. About three times unsuccessfully. Then she will search it three times in the box, also unsuccessfully. Then she will get mom to help her search for the ball. The mom will come and will find the ball in the basket, where it was all along, but Sally couldn't see it." Tongue

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30-03-2012, 01:40 PM
RE: What kind of mental disorder is this?
(30-03-2012 07:19 AM)Luminon Wrote:  
(29-03-2012 05:59 PM)Dom Wrote:  I posted this once before:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7lQa3q_OAk
Well thank you very much, that is a very valuable information. So it's called Asperger's, you say. Explains a lot. I wouldn't flat out say that I have this Asperger's syndrome, not in a great extent (many pathologic signs don't fit on me) and I did much of work on social skills. But I'd say that due to neuroplasticity it is possible to move towards it on the spectrum and hopefully away from it. And I was near it on the spectrum to begin with, that much I'm sure.







Hi, neuroscience student here. Unfortunately, the etiology of Asperger's is unknown. There are many hypotheses, however, that suggest such things like decreased neural connectivity in certain parts of the brain or abnormal functioning of serotonin receptors.

As for neuroplasticity, I have never heard of anyone who did not have Asperger's develop the condition later in life. Since many of possible causes of Asperger's have to do with neural organization and such, Asperger's is probably developed in utero. But, it is definitely possible to reduce the Asperger's symptoms -- but only in children. The brain is still developing until around the age of 25, and with proper cognitive behavioral therapy, as many as 20% of children with Asperger's will no longer meet the diagnostic criteria by adulthood. That said, therapy is successful in reducing the symptoms for people of all ages.

Unrelated to Asperger's but pertinent to your original post, there is a very interesting disorder called hemineglect that involves the malfunctioning of one of the brain's hemisphere. Usually due to stroke or some kind of unilateral brain damage, patients with hemineglect lose conscious awareness in one half of their body. Patients will literally walk into walls because they do not see it on their left side, for example. When eating, they might leave one side of the plate completely untouched or forget that they have food in one side of their cheeks and leave it there unswallowed. When visually prompted though hemineglect patients will, for example, realize their plate is still half full and finish the uneaten food.
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30-03-2012, 02:41 PM
RE: What kind of mental disorder is this?
(30-03-2012 01:40 PM)xeones Wrote:  Hi, neuroscience student here. Unfortunately, the etiology of Asperger's is unknown. There are many hypotheses, however, that suggest such things like decreased neural connectivity in certain parts of the brain or abnormal functioning of serotonin receptors.

As for neuroplasticity, I have never heard of anyone who did not have Asperger's develop the condition later in life. Since many of possible causes of Asperger's have to do with neural organization and such, Asperger's is probably developed in utero. But, it is definitely possible to reduce the Asperger's symptoms -- but only in children.
I'd say that because I know programmers. Programmers are not normal people. They must have unusual skills, world-building in their mind. They must be also extremely detached, not to react emotionally to errors in program. People like my older brother would sooner smash the damn thing to pieces than debug one day's work. Programmers spend many hours a day aware only of their head and of their hands, they tune out the whole body, emotions, everything and devote all the attention to mental mechanism of the script. This is not normal either and I believe it does have consequences due to neuroplasticity. They may lose patience with people if they don't respond as fast and as logically as a computer would. Such programmers may be succesful among men at work, but they do not understand women and can not just switch their emotions back on when the workday ends. They communicate on their own level and outsiders don't understand them when they go together to the gym to prevent another programmer plague - obesity...
I would definitely believe that mathphys faculty students are natural-born heavy aspies, they must have a nest there. But as for programmers, I guess their work must push their condition further than it already is.

And yeah, I'm a former freeware game programmer. I even won a #1 prize for an original game in 2005.
(30-03-2012 01:40 PM)xeones Wrote:  The brain is still developing until around the age of 25, and with proper cognitive behavioral therapy, as many as 20% of children with Asperger's will no longer meet the diagnostic criteria by adulthood. That said, therapy is successful in reducing the symptoms for people of all ages.
That's interesting, I heard the brain is developing until the age of 40. Some people's, at least. Maybe most of people reach their zenith soon.
Yes, I too heard that Asperger syndrome gets better as people mature. My father is a good example of this, he had similar problems to me, only perhaps lesser because he lived in a society where kids took care of each other (didn't have any computers or TV) instead bullying, as unbelievable as it is.
It took some decades but he became quite a ladies' man Censored

(30-03-2012 01:40 PM)xeones Wrote:  Unrelated to Asperger's but pertinent to your original post, there is a very interesting disorder called hemineglect that involves the malfunctioning of one of the brain's hemisphere. Usually due to stroke or some kind of unilateral brain damage, patients with hemineglect lose conscious awareness in one half of their body. Patients will literally walk into walls because they do not see it on their left side, for example. When eating, they might leave one side of the plate completely untouched or forget that they have food in one side of their cheeks and leave it there unswallowed. When visually prompted though hemineglect patients will, for example, realize their plate is still half full and finish the uneaten food.
Never heard of it, but this one seems fairly straightforward, nothing psychologic about it. It sounds like something they featured on Radiolab.

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