What's your wheels?
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17-08-2016, 09:54 PM
RE: What's your wheels?
(17-08-2016 09:26 PM)Fireball Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 08:36 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Comes with a 250,000 mile warranty as long as you take it back to the dealership for maintenance.

Worth it! Vehicles nowadays are so complicated with the electronics, I even bought the extended warranty for my new Kia Forte. One part breaks outside of warranty, and that warranty would have been paid for. I can still fix my '70 Chevy Truck, and a couple of other cars I have, but these new things take diagnostic tools that I don't have. It's cheaper for me to buy a car that only takes oil changes and such for 100,000 miles or ten years. I can still do a lot of the maintenance, but that may change as I get older.

Good for you. I've never had any interest in mechanical things. I'm sure I could do simple repairs I just don't care to. Besides changing air filters, wiper blades and checking on fluids I don't touch the car.

The new autos are 1/2 mechanical and 1/2 electronics. Even, as you say, you were inclined to do a repair you'd need heavy duty diagnostic tools.

Last year the warning lights on my car started to come on and off sporadically. Took in to the dealer. A week later I picked it up and still was having a light show on the dash. Took it in again and they found rats had eaten away at the wiring Dodgy

So I fixed the car with commercial grade rat poison.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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17-08-2016, 10:58 PM
RE: What's your wheels?
Been spending a lot of time on this lately.

[Image: mjmfzo.jpg]

So many cats, so few good recipes.
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17-08-2016, 10:59 PM
RE: What's your wheels?
(17-08-2016 09:26 PM)Fireball Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 08:36 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Comes with a 250,000 mile warranty as long as you take it back to the dealership for maintenance.

Worth it! Vehicles nowadays are so complicated with the electronics, I even bought the extended warranty for my new Kia Forte. One part breaks outside of warranty, and that warranty would have been paid for. I can still fix my '70 Chevy Truck, and a couple of other cars I have, but these new things take diagnostic tools that I don't have. It's cheaper for me to buy a car that only takes oil changes and such for 100,000 miles or ten years. I can still do a lot of the maintenance, but that may change as I get older.

Actually the newer cars are easier to work on than the old stuff...I went through a period where, if it wasn't caubureted, I didn't want to touch it. I still know a lot of mechanics my age and older who think everything under the hood of a 1990 or newer car is witchcraft, lol.

But the truth is, if you learn one system, you've learned them all, with minor differences that you can figure out easily. It's sort of like setting a digital watch- if you never read the instructions or were shown how, it'd be a bitch to figure out...learn to set one, and you get the general idea. Ok, I'm going to hold something down until something flashes, then use probably two other buttons to make that flashing number increase and decrease, etc.
A Ford Mondeo and a Mercedes SLS black are very similar in terms of the components under the hood. Your fuel injection system is going to include injectors, somewhere...throttle body or injector rail, etc...the car will have a coil or a coil on each plug or a coil NEAR each plug or a couple of coils that handle a few plugs each, blah blah blah...but it's all the same thing. Oxygen sensors, crank and cam position sensors, EGR valve, throttle position sensor...learn a few basic components and what they do, and you'll be surprised how simple the things get. An added bonus is that newer cars tell you what's wrong with them, much of the time. Often no diagnostic tool is needed anymore, but any OBDII car- which most are since the late 90's- you can buy a bluetooth code reader that links to your smart phone online for about $20. Plug it in to the OBD port, and follow the directions on your phone. No computer diagnostic is 100%- it will basically give you it's best guess based on what info it's being provided, and sometimes the sensor providing that info IS the problem, but it's a great help, and points you in the general direction of the problem, at least.

Not to say working on your own cars is for everyone- but if you like to do your own maintenance, don't let the new cars scare you off. Same dance, different tune.

The OBDII code readers are available on http://www.gearbest.com or http://www.banggood.com
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18-08-2016, 07:05 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
(17-08-2016 10:58 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Been spending a lot of time on this lately.

[Image: mjmfzo.jpg]

Pretty nice....

Is that the gas fill underneath your right leg????

...

Looks like it'll do a whole lot better in the dirt than my last "dirt bike" -- a 68 Triumph 650 TT - with a whopping 2 inches of suspension travel.... Basically a road bike they put knobbies on, and put the pipe up nice and high (so it could burn your leg). It rode offroad like a pissed off bronco....

.......................................

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18-08-2016, 07:11 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
(17-08-2016 10:59 PM)The Dark One Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 09:26 PM)Fireball Wrote:  Worth it! Vehicles nowadays are so complicated with the electronics, I even bought the extended warranty for my new Kia Forte. One part breaks outside of warranty, and that warranty would have been paid for. I can still fix my '70 Chevy Truck, and a couple of other cars I have, but these new things take diagnostic tools that I don't have. It's cheaper for me to buy a car that only takes oil changes and such for 100,000 miles or ten years. I can still do a lot of the maintenance, but that may change as I get older.

Actually the newer cars are easier to work on than the old stuff...I went through a period where, if it wasn't caubureted, I didn't want to touch it. I still know a lot of mechanics my age and older who think everything under the hood of a 1990 or newer car is witchcraft, lol.

But the truth is, if you learn one system, you've learned them all, with minor differences that you can figure out easily. It's sort of like setting a digital watch- if you never read the instructions or were shown how, it'd be a bitch to figure out...learn to set one, and you get the general idea. Ok, I'm going to hold something down until something flashes, then use probably two other buttons to make that flashing number increase and decrease, etc.
A Ford Mondeo and a Mercedes SLS black are very similar in terms of the components under the hood. Your fuel injection system is going to include injectors, somewhere...throttle body or injector rail, etc...the car will have a coil or a coil on each plug or a coil NEAR each plug or a couple of coils that handle a few plugs each, blah blah blah...but it's all the same thing. Oxygen sensors, crank and cam position sensors, EGR valve, throttle position sensor...learn a few basic components and what they do, and you'll be surprised how simple the things get. An added bonus is that newer cars tell you what's wrong with them, much of the time. Often no diagnostic tool is needed anymore, but any OBDII car- which most are since the late 90's- you can buy a bluetooth code reader that links to your smart phone online for about $20. Plug it in to the OBD port, and follow the directions on your phone. No computer diagnostic is 100%- it will basically give you it's best guess based on what info it's being provided, and sometimes the sensor providing that info IS the problem, but it's a great help, and points you in the general direction of the problem, at least.

Not to say working on your own cars is for everyone- but if you like to do your own maintenance, don't let the new cars scare you off. Same dance, different tune.

The OBDII code readers are available on http://www.gearbest.com or http://www.banggood.com

I agree... One of the biggest reasons we collect the twin cam Saturns -- is they're so easy to work on... There's really not that much electronics.... I know where every sensor on the engine is, and what it does. Pre-1996, they had "self test" and 96 and after use the OBDII - and of course I've got a reader. The other thing - is there's a community of Saturn freaks that I visit online -- and these guys know these cars - and are very willing to share their insights and experience....About the only thing I won't do is transmission work. (not that it's a common problem)..

Plus -- they're all metric - which is easier than the last generation of GM's I worked on (mid 80's) which had both SAE and metric.... What a pain in the ass...

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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18-08-2016, 09:23 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
(17-08-2016 10:59 PM)The Dark One Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 09:26 PM)Fireball Wrote:  Worth it! Vehicles nowadays are so complicated with the electronics, I even bought the extended warranty for my new Kia Forte. One part breaks outside of warranty, and that warranty would have been paid for. I can still fix my '70 Chevy Truck, and a couple of other cars I have, but these new things take diagnostic tools that I don't have. It's cheaper for me to buy a car that only takes oil changes and such for 100,000 miles or ten years. I can still do a lot of the maintenance, but that may change as I get older.

Actually the newer cars are easier to work on than the old stuff...I went through a period where, if it wasn't caubureted, I didn't want to touch it. I still know a lot of mechanics my age and older who think everything under the hood of a 1990 or newer car is witchcraft, lol.

But the truth is, if you learn one system, you've learned them all, with minor differences that you can figure out easily. It's sort of like setting a digital watch- if you never read the instructions or were shown how, it'd be a bitch to figure out...learn to set one, and you get the general idea. Ok, I'm going to hold something down until something flashes, then use probably two other buttons to make that flashing number increase and decrease, etc.
A Ford Mondeo and a Mercedes SLS black are very similar in terms of the components under the hood. Your fuel injection system is going to include injectors, somewhere...throttle body or injector rail, etc...the car will have a coil or a coil on each plug or a coil NEAR each plug or a couple of coils that handle a few plugs each, blah blah blah...but it's all the same thing. Oxygen sensors, crank and cam position sensors, EGR valve, throttle position sensor...learn a few basic components and what they do, and you'll be surprised how simple the things get. An added bonus is that newer cars tell you what's wrong with them, much of the time. Often no diagnostic tool is needed anymore, but any OBDII car- which most are since the late 90's- you can buy a bluetooth code reader that links to your smart phone online for about $20. Plug it in to the OBD port, and follow the directions on your phone. No computer diagnostic is 100%- it will basically give you it's best guess based on what info it's being provided, and sometimes the sensor providing that info IS the problem, but it's a great help, and points you in the general direction of the problem, at least.

Not to say working on your own cars is for everyone- but if you like to do your own maintenance, don't let the new cars scare you off. Same dance, different tune.

The OBDII code readers are available on http://www.gearbest.com or http://www.banggood.com

I'm not scared of the diagnostic end. I'm pretty logical. What I don't want is to spend a cubic meter of money on a car, so I'll just get one with a lengthy warranty. Plus then I get all that newness in terms of safety features. As I said before, I'm putting disc brakes and rebuilding the front end of my truck while I'm at it. It has a 400 big block in it. If that goes south (rebuilt once before, at about 120k miles, now has about 220k miles) I'll probably go to a 6 Liter LS with a 4L80E or something. I also hang out a truck forum. I've seen guys getting 19+ MPG out of these. I get 13 on the highway in a long drive, 9 around town. Of course, it'll pull stumps out of the ground. If I have to replace the engine anyway, I may as well do the upgrade.
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18-08-2016, 09:26 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
13 mpg?????

Damn...

If my car got 13 mpg -- I'd be one skinny motherfucker -- from walking everywhere...

Big Grin

.......................................

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18-08-2016, 10:35 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
(18-08-2016 09:26 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  13 mpg?????

Damn...

If my car got 13 mpg -- I'd be one skinny motherfucker -- from walking everywhere...

Big Grin

No, we just use the truck for hauling and pulling a trailer (which have yet to buy) to go camping. My Kia gets a lot better mileage, about double that in town, and closer to triple that on the highway. The truck sits 99+% of the time.
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18-08-2016, 11:33 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
(18-08-2016 10:35 AM)Fireball Wrote:  
(18-08-2016 09:26 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  13 mpg?????

Damn...

If my car got 13 mpg -- I'd be one skinny motherfucker -- from walking everywhere...

Big Grin

No, we just use the truck for hauling and pulling a trailer (which have yet to buy) to go camping. My Kia gets a lot better mileage, about double that in town, and closer to triple that on the highway. The truck sits 99+% of the time.

I swear, MPG is the hardest number to chase. Back in my younger life, nobody ever said "I want a hotrod and I want 30 mpg"...ever! Now, that's a common desire. We get customers all the time that have all of these crazy ideas they've picked up from magazines or forums "I want 22 cylinders...bored...stroked....turbo-supercharged...nitrous oxide...automatic....systematic....hydromatic---and by the way, could we keep the fuel economy north of 40? " What?? :face palm:


I would rather a customer challenge me with a 2000hp 3 liter small block than a 500hp 40mpg engine. It's got to be easier.

Horsepower is easy...an engine is a big air pump. Make the pump more efficient. More displacement/less friction or resistance pretty much accounts for everything.

Torque is even easy...it really all comes down to moment and arm, at it's most basic.

But MPG...err...too many variables, and those variables are often at direct odds with the inherent variables in torque and horsepower.

Yet the customer wants what the customer wants. So far the most impressive vehicle we've built- and between you and I and the fencepost, I have no idea how we did it- is a 1950 Ford F1 pickup. Complete rebuild, custom chassis, 4 link rear, IFS front, coil overs all around, As much rubber under the back as we could fit, pretty chunky up front too. Cut the metal bed floor out and installed a pretty wooden bed floor. Rhino-lined the bed sides and exterior running boards. The rest of the truck was a Lexus blue metallic.
All custom interior, leather, stereo system, nav. Reworked the dash, inset everything and added foldout cup holders out of a Saab. (I'm just telling you everything because I'm at a loss)
Moved the fuel tank to the rear from behind the seat, and increased it to 29 gallons.
Moser 9" rear end, 3.73's.
Bored and stroked Ford 351w, to a 396 cid smallblock.
Auto trans, Monster AOD
Vortech supercharger, one wire alternator, power steering with a flaming river rack.
Vintage Air a/c, the mini system.

Truck dyno'ed at 580hp at the rear wheels, at 6250, developing 510 ft lbs of torque.

The goddamned thing gets 32 mpg on the highway. We didn't believe the owner, so he gave it to us for a week to drive. We actually clocked 33 mpg.

No fucking idea. Almost makes me religious.
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18-08-2016, 11:56 AM
RE: What's your wheels?
Got it all together just right. Just don't let the oil companies find out. Rolleyes

I had a '69 Camaro RS with a 327 and a 4-speed that I could boogie down the interstate at 90 MPH and get 23 MPG doing it. Never figured that one out, either.
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