What was the reason behind the creation of religion for you?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
14-11-2016, 10:08 AM
RE: What was the reason behind the creation of religion for you?
I once spent a few days somewhere in Southwest Asia, followed by more in east-central Africa. The nights away from electric lights were awesome and a person could be forgiven for thinking that "something up there is looking down on us!" Any explanation would be better than pure ignorance, at least for the folks who consider reality to be an affectation.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2016, 10:55 AM
RE: What was the reason behind the creation of religion for you?
The main reason is the belief that some system is necessary to keep human beings in check.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes GenesisNemesis's post
14-11-2016, 11:27 AM
RE: What was the reason behind the creation of religion for you?
(14-11-2016 10:55 AM)GenesisNemesis Wrote:  The main reason is the belief that some system is necessary to keep human beings in check.

That's true, sadly. Behaving and coexisting for their own sake simply isn't enough for many people. They need invisible buddies that are always watching and threats of punishment if they're naughty.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Dark Wanderer's post
07-04-2017, 05:25 PM
RE: What was the reason behind the creation of religion for you?
There are a lot of reasons that religion has been capitalized on throughout history, but religion was originally created organically because of our animal natures.

Two very important characteristics of the human animal are our adaptability and our sociability. They define us in really fundamental ways. Our adaptability is a result of our powerful analytical skills which we experience as a highly cognitive function, but which is also driven by, frankly, superstition. Our brains spend a lot of time trying to match facts and experiences and find patterns at a pre-logical level, and then we can use our large forebrains to assess those patterns for usefulness. Our forebrains allow us to develop an amazing (but still limited) capability to purposefully alter the patterns we look for and find. However, we will always produce these patterns and it has to be pre-logical or else it would take way too much energy and focus. When we find patterns, before we're consciously aware of them, we get chemically rewarded. The patterns we're most likely to find are the ones we're conditioned to feel (again, pre-logically) are most important--like facial recognition (pareidolia) and dangers, including cliffs (those dreams where you jolt awake), lions (reasonable avoidance of lions), and shit we don't understand (religion). If something we don't understand turns out not to be dangerous, we still have to assign an explanation, or else every time we see it we'll waste energy reacting like we don't already know it's okay. So religion's original purpose is a catch-all brain bin for things that we don't have any good words for but we need to remember aren't immediately threatening.

That's individual survival. Back to the second point, then, community survival means we can either use the same description for this brain bin, binding us together and giving us the benefit of insider/outsider signifiers, or every person's individual description, actively driving a wedge between us. There's not really any in-between. Now, I'm not arguing all that's true in the same way now. There are lots of things we could decide in our societies, local communities, family groups, &c. to make religion much more of a non-issue. I'm just saying that talking about religion as a modern organizations with storied histories based on a bunch of ancient tribal codes is like talking about the flower and the stalk. Not only are the roots still there, but also the soil, and it will be there long after any part of the plant.

It's important to remember that each person's brain is more or less biologically optimized for analysis. It doesn't directly translate to that person's adherence to or rejection of religion, because it's not the only factor--I think of it more like a person's biological tendency toward addiction. It adds to the equation, but a person's psychological environment is also a significant factor. Anyway, the more predisposed a person is, the more they're going to need something to occupy those processes, although they're still in control of whether they have to reconcile the cognitive dissonance by codifying their random firings or are fine with saying, "Heh, brains are weird."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes kmc's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: