What was your tipping point?
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19-11-2014, 08:47 PM
RE: What was your tipping point?
(19-11-2014 08:18 PM)TN Skeptic Wrote:  
(19-11-2014 05:51 PM)Rahn127 Wrote:  Your story is amazing. To read that someone can go through that process in an evening while reading a story to their son actually moved me.

Welcome to the forums.

I never had a tipping point, but about 8 years ago, I identified as an atheist for the first time. Kinda like walking around for most of my life not knowing I was human and then reading about all the characteristics of a human being.
"Hey, I'm one of those and always have been."


It wasn't in one night. It was more like 2 months. At that point the Newtown trajedy happened and I was like what the hell have I been reading to my kid?? Sorry to ruin the vision you had. My little one can only handle about 10-20 minutes of reading at one time. After that he is completely gone and thinking about more important things like his Legos!!

Two months is still a relatively short period of time and I would agree that Legos are more important than religion Smile

I remember talking a woman who was a fundamentalist and her sister had died in a car crash. A crash that wasn't her fault. Someone in the lane next to her lost control of their car and bumped into hers, causing her to cross a medium strip and hit head on into a truck. She accepted the death of her sister as part of god's plan.

I asked "How many other deaths do you need to accept in your god's plan before you acknowledge that a plan that relies on death is an evil plan ?"

Insanity - doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results
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19-11-2014, 08:47 PM
RE: What was your tipping point?
I had described myself as agnostic for years, I was having an issue in life and my mom was rather assertive about how I need to get back in church and turn my life over to god. Oh yeah? You talkin' to me? The conversation didn't go very well and I decided that I had it with the almost-atheism that agnosticism represented, I would settle this question once-and-for-all. I got John Loftus book"Why I Became An Atheist" where a former minister rejected the god hypothesis and he went into biblical scholarship, touched on science, which I already had skepticism about creationism because of my knowledge of science.
Loftus' critique of the absurdities of the bible and it's nonsensical god that allows evil in the world and does nothing to stop it, really hit home. I realized after I finished the book that I really didn't believe and I hadn't believed for a long time. I then realized that I had been an atheist for longer than I realized, I just acknowledged that the term describes me better than agnostic.
There had always been a part of me that defended the Christian belief system, even as an agnostic, but there was a point I reached that I realized I was under no obligation to defend the insane belief system. Internally I surrendered to my skepticism realizing -I DID NOT HAVE TO DEFEND IT!
Once that realization sunk in, my remaining beliefs turned to dust, I finally came to grips with what I truly believed or more accurately, what I didn't believe anymore.
Like a weight lifting off of my shoulders, I was able to finally put the stake through the heart of the monster that haunted me my whole life, the fear of hell, the guilt associated with never being perfect. Good riddance monsters, I live in reality, where the gods and demons no longer exist.

Gods derive their power from post-hoc rationalizations. -The Inquisition

Using the supernatural to explain events in your life is a failure of the intellect to comprehend the world around you. -The Inquisition
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19-11-2014, 09:38 PM
RE: What was your tipping point?
Quote:What was your tipping point?

Never really had one. I can't remember ever believing in God,, though I played the game because it seemed important to my grandparents and I had little to gain by not playing. I went to church, was active in the youth group, enjoyed summer camp. It's not like there aren't a million other things I fake, like having a fully functional set of mirror neurons, in an effort to fit in. That's just part of life. I didn't have as much of a reason once I left home, though. Nobody left to impress.

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20-11-2014, 02:37 AM
RE: What was your tipping point?
Hmmm. It was about a 14 year process... I'd say the final blow was an infant trauma that still makes me nauseous, and I was thinking about her after tucking my healthy, beautiful son into bed. And then my husband got called out on a child crimes case. A loving god? Part of god's plan? It would take a pretty sick fuck for those children to be a part of some marvelous plan - final conclusion, there is no god. There is no plan. "Shit happens" - Forrest Gump.

"If there's a single thing that life teaches us, it's that wishing doesn't make it so." - Lev Grossman
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20-11-2014, 02:53 AM
RE: What was your tipping point?
There was no huge relevatory moment. Religion just became irrelevant to me over a number of years. Most of the arguments I now use came much later with the advent of the internet. Incidently this was also the first time I realized that there were other people who thought tbe same way I did

The secret to a happy life is lowering your expectations to the point where they are already met
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20-11-2014, 04:07 AM
RE: What was your tipping point?
Hah. I tried. But I've always liked science too much...

Tipping point for me was when I went to some derpy lecture by some asshole who said he was gonna talk about origins of the universe. I was all excited for pictures of galaxies & shit but he was all excited for Jeeezus... Fucken dickwad. He's *still* employed at the university up the road. Bastard. Angry

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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20-11-2014, 04:16 AM
RE: What was your tipping point?
George Carlin.
I'm serious, I never really gave religion much thought about how it effects nearly everything here in the U.S.
I watched one of his specials and he went on a hilarious rant about religion.
I found that I agreed with most everything he said, and it made me angry.
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20-11-2014, 12:21 PM
RE: What was your tipping point?
(19-11-2014 08:47 PM)TheInquisition Wrote:  I had described myself as agnostic for years, I was having an issue in life and my mom was rather assertive about how I need to get back in church and turn my life over to god. Oh yeah? You talkin' to me? The conversation didn't go very well and I decided that I had it with the almost-atheism that agnosticism represented, I would settle this question once-and-for-all. I got John Loftus book"Why I Became An Atheist" where a former minister rejected the god hypothesis and he went into biblical scholarship, touched on science, which I already had skepticism about creationism because of my knowledge of science.
Loftus' critique of the absurdities of the bible and it's nonsensical god that allows evil in the world and does nothing to stop it, really hit home. I realized after I finished the book that I really didn't believe and I hadn't believed for a long time. I then realized that I had been an atheist for longer than I realized, I just acknowledged that the term describes me better than agnostic.
There had always been a part of me that defended the Christian belief system, even as an agnostic, but there was a point I reached that I realized I was under no obligation to defend the insane belief system. Internally I surrendered to my skepticism realizing -I DID NOT HAVE TO DEFEND IT!
Once that realization sunk in, my remaining beliefs turned to dust, I finally came to grips with what I truly believed or more accurately, what I didn't believe anymore.
Like a weight lifting off of my shoulders, I was able to finally put the stake through the heart of the monster that haunted me my whole life, the fear of hell, the guilt associated with never being perfect. Good riddance monsters, I live in reality, where the gods and demons no longer exist.

I had a similar feeling of a burden being lifted from my shoulders. Funny, because that's the same feeling religion claims to offer. I remember singing the Chris Tomlin-Amazing Grace (My Chains are Gone) song in church. I don't know why but I find that a little amusing!
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20-11-2014, 12:43 PM (This post was last modified: 20-11-2014 12:57 PM by Mr. Boston.)
RE: What was your tipping point?
I guess I just kinda figured anything that required so much will and effort to "believe" against all instinct and common sense was extremely unlikely to be true. I TRIED to believe, I really did, for a decade from age 4 to about 14, I really tried and I thought there was something wrong with ME for my lack of faith; that I didn't love God enough and that he would reveal himself to me once I righted myself. I realized I never REALLY did believe it, I just got to a point I could no longer pretend for the benefit of others, to avoid hurting people's feelings. I still won't say it's impossible for there to be a God. But it is VERY possible for there to not be one and in the face of a total lack of any evidence whatsoever that something exists I find it's a far more intellectually honest path to assume it does not. To me, this epiphany was sort of like Neo being awoken from the Matrix, lol. Suddenly, with the realization that there was no God, everything about the way religions work,and what they actually do in the world, and who benefits made a LOT more sense to me.

For some reason when people find out you DON'T believe in something for which there is no proof at all, they think they're entitled to an explanation from you, lol. I always tell people that I eventually realized that I never really believed in God at all; I believed in the people who taught me about God. It took me a LONG time to realize those people still deserved my love and that they weren't trying to do me a disservice, and that I wasn't doing them or myself any good by being angry about it. I could still believe in them without agreeing with them. It took some of THEM even longer to realize they could still receive my love and love me back even though I didn't have their faith. Some of them never got there and felt it necessary to invite me out of their lives. I feel bad about that, but not bad enough to pretend to believe in something I don't.
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20-11-2014, 02:55 PM
RE: What was your tipping point?
I didn't have much of a religious upbringing. I remember studying Greek & Roman mythology in high school, and though I'm not sure I put a lot of time into it then, I don't think I ever saw that as being too terribly different from Christianity. I never thought of atheism as a serious option until I came across a book on atheism at a local bookstore. I was intrigued, but even then, I didn't put a lot of thought into it.

If I were to have to define one particular tipping point, it would have to be when I sat down and finally read the Bible for the first time (I still read it regularly, but only with an intrigue that is along the lines of when I studied mythologies in H.S.) I'm familiar with the justifications, but I still can't completely wrap my mind around how people sincerely believe everything in there has to be true.

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