Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
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26-05-2015, 08:51 AM
RE: Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
(26-05-2015 08:31 AM)ClydeLee Wrote:  But not all Christians do think the teachings of Jesus are a moral code to live by. Plenty just kinda ignore that aspect of how he lives and follow in Pauls just belief system.

What's Paul's moral code in contrast to Jesus supposed humanistic one? Love fulfills the law? To love one's enemies, to returns kindness for curses? etc?
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26-05-2015, 09:28 AM (This post was last modified: 26-05-2015 10:05 AM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
(26-05-2015 06:36 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(25-05-2015 03:21 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  The Christian atheist ethos looks pretty much indistinguishable from humanism. The only difference seems to be a trivial metaphysical distinction that instead of God not existing the Christian atheist claims God is dead. meh. 6 of one, half a dozen of the other.

Well, that'd be like saying all Christians are just religious humanist. And all humanist are just non-religious Christians.

No that's not right. It's not an if and only if relationship. Christian ethos is a sufficient but not necessary condition for humanism (Christianity ⇒humanism) but humanism is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to be Christian given that the basic foundation of both the Christian and humanist ethos of the Golden Rule predated Christianity by millenia. ¬(humanism ⇒Christianity).

I mean that and the whole God is dead business.

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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26-05-2015, 10:16 AM (This post was last modified: 26-05-2015 12:12 PM by Tomasia.)
RE: Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
(26-05-2015 09:28 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  No that's not right. It's not an if and only if relationship. Christian ethos is a sufficient but not necessary condition for humanism (Christianity ⇒humanism) but humanism is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to be Christian given that the basic foundation of both the Christian and humanist ethos of the Golden Rule predated Christianity by millenia. ¬(humanism ⇒Christianity).

I mean that and the whole God is dead business.

You've reduced humanistic ethos to tweet size, as the ethos of the golden rule, when it's a great deal more than that, it's the ethos of liberalism and enlighten moral perceptions, that places a high value on rationalism and science, and a typical subscription to utilitarian moral understandings.
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26-05-2015, 12:08 PM
RE: Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
(12-05-2015 07:39 PM)pablo Wrote:  Jesus was said to be the son of god, and also god himself.
If you follow the teachings of jesus, it follows that you believe he existed.
That makes you a christian, christians believe in god. Christians cannot, by definition be atheists.

Nope.
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26-05-2015, 03:49 PM
RE: Where do you draw the line between atheist and Christian?
(26-05-2015 10:16 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(26-05-2015 09:28 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  No that's not right. It's not an if and only if relationship. Christian ethos is a sufficient but not necessary condition for humanism (Christianity ⇒humanism) but humanism is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to be Christian given that the basic foundation of both the Christian and humanist ethos of the Golden Rule predated Christianity by millenia. ¬(humanism ⇒Christianity).

I mean that and the whole God is dead business.

You've reduced humanistic ethos to tweet size, as the ethos of the golden rule, when it's a great deal more than that, it's the ethos of liberalism and enlighten moral perceptions, that places a high value on rationalism and science, and a typical subscription to utilitarian moral understandings.

I said the basic foundation of their ethos. Which, like the Christian ethos, it is.

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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