Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
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12-12-2016, 02:34 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:30 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(12-12-2016 02:18 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  I keep forgetting that you know more about science than the rest of us (as confirmed by your appeal to Merriam Webster!).

It seems that you have a hard time answering rather basic questions, but I'll take it that you acknowledge the previous statements as objectively true.

Quote:Biological Species Concept, Phylogenetic Species Concept, Morphological Species Concept. Depending on which one you use (which depends on what data you have available and/or access to), a scientist will define a specimen's classification at the species level differently. Making the definition of a species subjective but not a matter of opinion.

You apparently don't understand the difference between relative and subjective, since it's clear by this statement that you're conflating the two.

Quote:I'd ask if you hate being wrong, but you seem to arrogantly presume that you can't be wrong.

Says the guy who can't even answer basic questions, especially when he know he's about to contradict himself if he did.

"It seems that you have a hard time answering rather basic questions, but I'll take it that you acknowledge the previous statements as objectively true. "

Laugh out load Sure, whatever

"You apparently don't understand the difference between relative and subjective, since it's clear by this statement that you're conflating the two. "

Once again, you're wrong. Yes, the definition of a species can also be relative, but when all three definitions can be applied (all data needed for each definition is available), the designation of a species is still subjective because it depends on which definition is being used.

"Says the guy who can't even answer basic questions, especially when he know he's about to contradict himself if he did."

Laughat Oh man, you're hilarious. This schtick of accusing others of your own failings is starting to get stale though.



You don't want to be corrected, so why do you keep replying?

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
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12-12-2016, 02:34 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:19 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  *Definitionally true using one species definition from a non-science source*

There are 3 definitions of a species as used by biologists and paleontologists.

Cite one of these definitions from a science source.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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12-12-2016, 02:36 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:34 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(12-12-2016 02:19 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  *Definitionally true using one species definition from a non-science source*

There are 3 definitions of a species as used by biologists and paleontologists.

Cite one of these definitions from a science source.

I'm a science source because I am a paleontologist. Laugh out load

If you want another, check out the textbook "Evolutionary Analysis" by Freeman and Herron.

If you want to wallow in your ignorance, keep doing what you're doing.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
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12-12-2016, 02:38 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
Here are a few:
http://science.kennesaw.edu/~rmatson/Bio...ecies.html

going to admit you're wrong yet, Tomato? Laughat

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12-12-2016, 02:46 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:34 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Once again, you're wrong. Yes, the definition of a species can also be relative, but when all three definitions can be applied (all data needed for each definition is available), the designation of a species is still subjective because it depends on which definition is being used.

It's "relative" to which definition is being used, not "subjective".

sub·jec·tive

based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions.


The definition being used here is neither a matter of personal feelings, taste, or opinions, therefore the term "subjective" does not apply. The accurate term here would be "relative"

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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12-12-2016, 02:50 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:38 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Here are a few:
http://science.kennesaw.edu/~rmatson/Bio...ecies.html

going to admit you're wrong yet, Tomato? Laughat


"According to your source a definition the Cladisitc Species is:

Cladistic species concept: A species is a set of organisms (an evolutionary lineage) between two branch points or between one branch point and an extinction event or a modern population"


This is an factually/objectively true statement, verifiable by looking at the source you provided.

Are you going to admit you're wrong again, and that you erroneously conflated relative with subjective?

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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12-12-2016, 02:50 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:46 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(12-12-2016 02:34 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Once again, you're wrong. Yes, the definition of a species can also be relative, but when all three definitions can be applied (all data needed for each definition is available), the designation of a species is still subjective because it depends on which definition is being used.

It's "relative" to which definition is being used, not "subjective".

sub·jec·tive

based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions.


The definition being used here is neither a matter of personal feelings, taste, or opinions, therefore the term "subjective" does not apply. The accurate term here would be "relative"

Nope, it would still be subjective. Subjective and not merely an opinion because one could make the case for it being or not being a particular species based on which definition you use and why.

Going to admit you're wrong yet, tomato? Laughat

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12-12-2016, 02:51 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:50 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(12-12-2016 02:38 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Here are a few:
http://science.kennesaw.edu/~rmatson/Bio...ecies.html

going to admit you're wrong yet, Tomato? Laughat


"According to your source a definition the Cladisitc Species is:

Cladistic species concept: A species is a set of organisms (an evolutionary lineage) between two branch points or between one branch point and an extinction event or a modern population"


This is an factually/objectively true statement, verifiable by looking at the source you provided.

Are you going to admit you're wrong again, and that you erroneously conflated relative with subjective?

And what would be one species under one definition of a species, could be another under another definition. Do you know how definitions work? I mean, you can copy and paste them but I don't think you've any clue what they mean...Consider

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12-12-2016, 02:52 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:50 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Nope, it would still be subjective. Subjective and not merely an opinion because one could make the case for it being or not being a particular species based on which definition you use and why.

Again relative, not subjective, lol. The meaning of the word is relative to which definition is being used, duh.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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12-12-2016, 02:54 PM
RE: Where is the Basis for our Judgments?
(12-12-2016 02:52 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(12-12-2016 02:50 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Nope, it would still be subjective. Subjective and not merely an opinion because one could make the case for it being or not being a particular species based on which definition you use and why.

Again relative, not subjective, lol. The meaning of the word is relative to which definition is being used, duh.

But here's another example:

(12-12-2016 02:38 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Here are a few:
http://science.kennesaw.edu/~rmatson/Bio...ecies.html

going to admit you're wrong yet, Tomato? Laughat


"According to your source a definition the Cladisitc Species is:

Cladistic species concept: A species is a set of organisms (an evolutionary lineage) between two branch points or between one branch point and an extinction event or a modern population"


This is an factually/objectively true statement, verifiable by looking at the source you provided.

Are you going to admit you're wrong again, and that you erroneously conflated relative with subjective?

"Again relative, not subjective, lol. The meaning of the word is relative to which definition is being used, duh. "

Meaning that you aren't going to admit when you're wrong. Drinking Beverage

(the designation of a specimen to a particular species is subjective because there are multiple species definitions for the scientist to choose from based upon their own expertise and the data available)

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