Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
01-10-2012, 06:13 AM
Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
(30-09-2012 11:30 PM)aurora Wrote:  I used to be called a 'masseus' but now I'm just a 'masseur'. I liked the sexist name better Tongue

As long as I get a happy ending I'll call you whichever one you like. Evil_monster

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-10-2012, 07:32 AM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
(30-09-2012 11:30 PM)aurora Wrote:  I used to be called a 'masseuse' but now I'm just a 'masseur'. I liked the sexist name better Tongue

fixed.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
01-10-2012, 09:23 AM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
Picking up on Cuffsy's "lawyer" example and coupling it (oooh eeer!) with Erx's characteristic single entendre...

What gender would you immediately think of with the word "hooker"?

My dad would think male, cos he used to be one.
But I used to play full-back so I would not immediately connect it to a rugby position.



Anyway, I'm thinking that there are three levels of communication regarding spoken language... yeah, yeah, continuum, blah, blah, thanks HoC, I'm a hypocritical, sanctimonious, pattern-recognising ape so, bite me!... and I'm referring to the 3 different ways that I communicate.

My current 3 flatmates, all from Vietnam have differing degrees of capability with English.

Girl 9 (I don't know her name): Basic, hand signals, over-exaggerated facial expressions and, well, pictionary!

Swan: Simple sentences, innuendo and naughtiness is usable but has to be more physical than verbal.

Kelly: Business English, full-blown irony, subtle nuance etc.

It makes dinner interesting when I have to use all three in a single conversation.

It's never frustrating and often funny.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like DLJ's post
01-10-2012, 09:31 AM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
(01-10-2012 07:32 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(30-09-2012 11:30 PM)aurora Wrote:  I used to be called a 'masseuse' but now I'm just a 'masseur'. I liked the sexist name better Tongue

fixed.

I thought a masseuse was a female and a masseur is a male? In that case, I take back what I said about a happy ending if you've become a masseur. No

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-10-2012, 04:58 PM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
Thanks for the correction, Chas, I love it when you look after me Blush

Erx, when I qualified as a massage therapist (in 1995) the terminology was masseuse but now, as we're all lumped in one basket, it's masseur. It's poo, that's what it is Dodgy

Humankind Dodgy (a total misnomer)
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes aurora's post
01-10-2012, 05:58 PM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
Years ago I was referred to in my wedding announcement as a bartendress. I had never heard that before and haven't since. I certainly didn't put that down when I filled out the info. I was a bartender. Bartendress...oh FFS.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Anjele's post
02-10-2012, 07:07 PM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
I acknowledge and respect the fact that languages tend to evolve with their culture; but personally, when I hear "there's lots of people outside" or "you and me should go" or "Josh and me went"; the bottom corner of my left eye starts to twitch.

This also occurs when I see words like "Till" and "fucken" and "you're" (possessive) and "your" (you are). Or, one of my newer ones; "try and open the door". You don't try "and" do something; you try "TO" do something. ( Censored )

Languages evolve, yes, but for the sake of fuck, people, we can't stick to the basic construct just a little bit??? I'm certain it's only a matter of time until "No" means "Yes".

Good news for rapists, I suppose.

Through profound pain comes profound knowledge.
Ridi, Pagliaccio, sul tuo amore infranto! Ridi del duol, che t'avvelena il cor!
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Misanthropik's post
02-10-2012, 07:14 PM
RE: Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
I just got hit with one tonight. A friend said 'I was the last one to stay awake', and then I said 'Don't you mean the last one to fall asleep?'.

At least it's not as bad as when I get picked on for having frenglishisms like 'Close the light'. Dodgy

[Image: 3d366d5c-72a0-4228-b835-f404c2970188_zps...1381867723]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes cheapthrillseaker's post
03-10-2012, 03:34 PM
Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
What a delightful thread this has turned out to be!

It is god to keep in mind that English is perhaps not the best example of a perfect or even efficient system of communication. It is, however, an excellent illustration of evolution. When you consider the myriad contributors to the language it's amazing it works at all.

As for the comments of about prepositional positions perhaps this is the result of a language which began as German and later borrowed, both it's vocabulary and some grammar, from other languages? Perhaps not just Latin but also French (not precisely the same as Latin)?

I'd like to add that when it comes to language evolving there are times when the evolution occurs as the result of utility or necessity (good) and other times when it occurs out of misuse (irksome).

Examples of misuse which I find terribly irksome:
Disassociate
Irregardless

And may I just say its even more irksome to find that my iPhone doesn't consider these words to be spelled incorrectly?

He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! -Brian's mum
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Cardinal Smurf's post
03-10-2012, 03:37 PM
Who gets to decide what "good English" is?
It is also god to keep in mind that an iPhone is not the most effective tool for typing words such as "good."

*sigh*

He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! -Brian's mum
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Cardinal Smurf's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: