Who was Saint Paul?
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13-08-2016, 05:53 AM
RE: Who was Saint Paul?
(13-08-2016 04:27 AM)Gert Heide Wrote:  Exactly. Kids in school are advised to fact-check. Would that adults could remember this advice.

It's vital of course when considering religion-centred debates to remember that various consensus views have been discarded. The Gospels and Acts are today regarded even by many conservative [i.e. practising Christian] scholars as works of self-serving fantasy fiction from which it's impossible to reconstruct anything like a reliable history of Christianity's early decades. For centuries, scarcely a single living person could have been found to challenge now abandoned consensus views, reminding us that contemporary consensus views once had absolutely no supporters.

I had in mind, when I posted, these words written by Bart Ehrman when constructing what he thought was an irrefutable demolition of someone else's point of view.

"Mythicists of this ilk should not be surprised that their views are not taken seriously by real scholars, mentioned by experts in the field, or even read by them."

There you have it. Real scholars all agree on one thing, and there's more of them than there are of you, so it's just a numbers game and "you" can shut up. The appalling implication is that anyone who's come to an opinion about anything whatsoever should take into account what the consensus of 'real scholars' [like those nineteenth century professors, vicars and schooolmasters who thought the world was formed by God six thousand years ago] thinks. Consensus certainly matters, as Ehrman implies, but only to people who can't be bothered to think for themselves.

Bart couldn't cope with a non existent Jeebus, and nor could his accountant. His books wouldn't sell.
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13-08-2016, 10:27 AM
RE: Who was Saint Paul?
(13-08-2016 05:53 AM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(13-08-2016 04:27 AM)Gert Heide Wrote:  Exactly. Kids in school are advised to fact-check. Would that adults could remember this advice.

It's vital of course when considering religion-centred debates to remember that various consensus views have been discarded. The Gospels and Acts are today regarded even by many conservative [i.e. practising Christian] scholars as works of self-serving fantasy fiction from which it's impossible to reconstruct anything like a reliable history of Christianity's early decades. For centuries, scarcely a single living person could have been found to challenge now abandoned consensus views, reminding us that contemporary consensus views once had absolutely no supporters.

I had in mind, when I posted, these words written by Bart Ehrman when constructing what he thought was an irrefutable demolition of someone else's point of view.

"Mythicists of this ilk should not be surprised that their views are not taken seriously by real scholars, mentioned by experts in the field, or even read by them."

There you have it. Real scholars all agree on one thing, and there's more of them than there are of you, so it's just a numbers game and "you" can shut up. The appalling implication is that anyone who's come to an opinion about anything whatsoever should take into account what the consensus of 'real scholars' [like those nineteenth century professors, vicars and schooolmasters who thought the world was formed by God six thousand years ago] thinks. Consensus certainly matters, as Ehrman implies, but only to people who can't be bothered to think for themselves.

Bart couldn't cope with a non existent Jeebus, and nor could his accountant. His books wouldn't sell.

Bart takes things seriously. He's a master historian who enjoies his work tremendously. He won't even accept offers from anyone to assist him, as he enjoys doing it himself.

I offered to help him in his debate with Dr. Price, and his reply this morning was:

"Thanks for your offer! I appreciate it very much. But I’m afraid that I prefer to do my own research. Thanks for offering to help anyway. All best,

- Bart Ehrman
"

Bart D. Ehrman
James A. Gray Distinguished Professor
Department of Religious Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Please join: The Bart Ehrman Blog
At http://www.ehrmanblog.org
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