Why?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
25-01-2016, 10:29 AM
RE: Why?
(25-01-2016 07:05 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  I think life is so overbearingly rich, with a profound sense of order, and tragic beauty. As a work of art, there are no competitors. All great artist in comparison only attempt to imitate life.

(25-01-2016 08:49 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  I think of beauty of nature, of human life, is one that surpassed even the greatest works of art. Great art only attempts to imitate this.

(25-01-2016 09:50 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  No, you can say what's "great" is subjective, and that what I personally consider great art, is perhaps different than what you would.

Perhaps human existence, and reality is a hideous and grotesque thing to you, like a pile of monkey poo, but for others it may be a thing of deep beauty and wonder.

The magnificence of creation (or the lack thereof) has been addressed many times in the past. Ingersoll spoke of it in the late 1800's. Seth Andrews has spoken of it in our time.

If you are going to worship a being for creating the joys of life, for creating a wondrous, complex and beautiful world, then you have to credit them for the bad things too.

The efficiency of cancer, the tenacity of AIDS, the ferocity of natural disasters. Poverty, disease, famine, parasitical life forms, all of this has been eloquently presented by great speakers and writers. It is called the Problem of Suffering and I'm sure you've heard of it.

There is nothing wrong with appreciating the beauty of the world and rejoicing in your life. You can marvel at the combination of chances and the slim odds that resulted in your existence.

But if you wish to attribute these things to a creator deity, then you have to give them credit for the harsher side as well. Once you do that, the benevolent deity concept falls apart fairly quickly.

Help for the living. Hope for the dead. ~ R.G. Ingersoll

Freedom offers opportunity. Opportunity confers responsibility. Responsibility to use the freedom we enjoy wisely, honestly and humanely. ~ Noam Chomsky
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Fatbaldhobbit's post
25-01-2016, 10:35 AM
RE: Why?
(25-01-2016 10:15 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(25-01-2016 10:04 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  There, we can agree, because personal taste is subjective. Now knowing this, if you want to sound like less of a art-snob, try to avoid projecting your opinions as universal truths.
And you don't get to project that when I say something is great, just like when anybody else does, that they're expressing universal truths. I'm sure there are people who think Twilight is a better movie then Twelve Years A Slave, that Nicholas Sparks is a better writer than Cormac McCarthy.


I wasn't the one that claimed that 'great art' was that which strove to copy nature, which reads like all other art doesn't get to count as 'great art'. It didn't sound like 'this is what I like' so much as 'this is superior and deserves it's own separate category regardless of taste'.


(25-01-2016 10:15 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
Quote:I'm an art major that studied for a practical field, in a school filled with other technical degrees. I went to school with industrial, fashion, and web design majors.
And I'm the one acting like a snob?


If citing one's professional background is considered being a snob, then I guess I'm guilty as charged; and with a more informed opinion than you, thanks to said background.


(25-01-2016 10:15 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
Quote:that to segregate it off as the only stuff worthy of being labeled 'great' makes you sound like an idiot to anybody that actually needs to make a living being creative.
I know, when I tell my friends about some of the great restaurants in our area, it must be very offensive for all those other countless restaurants I didn't deem great, or haven't ate it to offer such accolades.


If you separated all sit-down restaurants into their own category and then said they were the only restaurants capable of making 'great food' and worthy of such an unnecessary distinction? Then yes, you would be a pretentious food asshole.

[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-01-2016, 10:41 AM
RE: Why?
(25-01-2016 10:29 AM)Fatbaldhobbit Wrote:  
(25-01-2016 07:05 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  I think life is so overbearingly rich, with a profound sense of order, and tragic beauty. As a work of art, there are no competitors. All great artist in comparison only attempt to imitate life.

(25-01-2016 08:49 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  I think of beauty of nature, of human life, is one that surpassed even the greatest works of art. Great art only attempts to imitate this.

(25-01-2016 09:50 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  No, you can say what's "great" is subjective, and that what I personally consider great art, is perhaps different than what you would.

Perhaps human existence, and reality is a hideous and grotesque thing to you, like a pile of monkey poo, but for others it may be a thing of deep beauty and wonder.

The magnificence of creation (or the lack thereof) has been addressed many times in the past. Ingersoll spoke of it in the late 1800's. Seth Andrews has spoken of it in our time.

If you are going to worship a being for creating the joys of life, for creating a wondrous, complex and beautiful world, then you have to credit them for the bad things too.

The efficiency of cancer, the tenacity of AIDS, the ferocity of natural disasters. Poverty, disease, famine, parasitical life forms, all of this has been eloquently presented by great speakers and writers. It is called the Problem of Suffering and I'm sure you've heard of it.

There is nothing wrong with appreciating the beauty of the world and rejoicing in your life. You can marvel at the combination of chances and the slim odds that resulted in your existence.

But if you wish to attribute these things to a creator deity, then you have to give them credit for the harsher side as well. Once you do that, the benevolent deity concept falls apart fairly quickly.

Well, when I speak of beauty, it's something I'm applying to a totality. It's a tragic beauty, both the agony and joy of life.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-01-2016, 10:44 AM (This post was last modified: 25-01-2016 10:47 AM by Tomasia.)
RE: Why?
(25-01-2016 10:35 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  If you separated all sit-down restaurants into their own category and then said they were the only restaurants capable of making 'great food' and worthy of such an unnecessary distinction? Then yes, you would be a pretentious food asshole.


And apparently you don't understand the distinction between a claim about what constitutes as great food, and a claim that only these particular restaurants are capable of making great food.

The difference between a claim about what constitutes as great art, and a claim that only these select artist are capable of creating great art.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-01-2016, 10:56 AM
RE: Why?
(23-01-2016 03:33 PM)Fodder_From_The_Truth Wrote:  
(23-01-2016 03:25 PM)dimaniac Wrote:  free will


He could prove he exists and I'd still choose not to worship him.

Try again.

Me too. My first taste of being free was in 11th grade in Bible Doctrines class when i wrote a paper and turned it in saying that if God is as He is being presented to us He has no respect coming from me. It was years later that I realized that there was no such animal.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-01-2016, 11:16 AM
RE: Why?
(25-01-2016 09:42 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  I said great art does, not all art.

Is this some sort of No True Art thing?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes RobbyPants's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: