Why I Doubted My Own Vision
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
11-01-2015, 09:46 PM
Why I Doubted My Own Vision
Long ago, before I realized I was atheist, I was looking into where my beliefs were taking me. I researched ways to find out more about myself, my psyche, and my "soul." I discovered a modified version of tratak, a type of meditation. This one used a mirror. No, I won't explain exactly what the method was; you'll see why not.

Before now, only a handful of people ever about me having a vision. I won't go into great detail, since I reserve that for a very few people in my life (so far, only three). Also, just thinking about it sends shivers up my spine.

I performed this meditation many times, each time getting a little closer and a little deeper. After a long time, I was no longer in the mirror, just the wall behind me. Only my eyes remained. Then the vision started. It wasn't the nice, sweet, enlightening vision you normally hear about. Mine was full of horrible, frightening images. They all looked real. Not in a dreamy ethereal fog, but as if everything was happening right there in front of me. Since that vision, no images of demons or any image in a horror movie or any photograph of a crime scene scare me. However, to this day, I hate mirrors. Not in a normal way; I want to smash almost every mirror I come across.

But here's the thing: Even then, I didn't believe that it was sent from any divine being. I believed, as I do now, that it all came from inside my own brain. It wasn't some sort of collective consciousness or universal energy that I had tapped into. I just merely had some sort of waking realistic "dream." I never once thought some deity or deities had deemed me worthy of their connection.

Nothing to this day has convinced or will convince me that this vision made me special to any supernatural being or force. It was concocted by my own neurons. The only regret I have is that I didn't do this with some sort of brain scan going on.

That's why when I hear of people having prophetic dreams or visions, I still don't believe them. Been there, done that. And who would have thought that an atheist would have a vision, huh?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 6 users Like Clockwork's post
11-01-2015, 10:06 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 09:46 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  Long ago, before I realized I was atheist, I was looking into where my beliefs were taking me. I researched ways to find out more about myself, my psyche, and my "soul." I discovered a modified version of tratak, a type of meditation. This one used a mirror. No, I won't explain exactly what the method was; you'll see why not.

Before now, only a handful of people ever about me having a vision. I won't go into great detail, since I reserve that for a very few people in my life (so far, only three). Also, just thinking about it sends shivers up my spine.

I performed this meditation many times, each time getting a little closer and a little deeper. After a long time, I was no longer in the mirror, just the wall behind me. Only my eyes remained. Then the vision started. It wasn't the nice, sweet, enlightening vision you normally hear about. Mine was full of horrible, frightening images. They all looked real. Not in a dreamy ethereal fog, but as if everything was happening right there in front of me. Since that vision, no images of demons or any image in a horror movie or any photograph of a crime scene scare me. However, to this day, I hate mirrors. Not in a normal way; I want to smash almost every mirror I come across.

But here's the thing: Even then, I didn't believe that it was sent from any divine being. I believed, as I do now, that it all came from inside my own brain. It wasn't some sort of collective consciousness or universal energy that I had tapped into. I just merely had some sort of waking realistic "dream." I never once thought some deity or deities had deemed me worthy of their connection.

Nothing to this day has convinced or will convince me that this vision made me special to any supernatural being or force. It was concocted by my own neurons. The only regret I have is that I didn't do this with some sort of brain scan going on.

That's why when I hear of people having prophetic dreams or visions, I still don't believe them. Been there, done that. And who would have thought that an atheist would have a vision, huh?

You met the dweller on the theshold. This is a vision of yourself in your current state of mind. The scriptures related to this (Upanishads) note that you must be prepared (righteous) in order to get past the dweller.

In the Bible, the dweller for Adam is Yahweh. All of Mankind is a mirror of the Son of God. Before Jesus could silence Satan, the higher mind was required to do this as Yahweh. Jesus then did it when he met Satan in the Desert.

Zachariah 3

3 And he shewed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him.

2 And the Lord said unto Satan, The Lord rebuke thee, O Satan; even the Lord that hath chosen Jerusalem rebuke thee: is not this a brand plucked out of the fire?

3 Now Joshua was clothed with filthy garments, and stood before the angel.

4 And he answered and spake unto those that stood before him, saying, Take away the filthy garments from him. And unto him he said, Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment.

The dweller is your own fear. Just as Yahweh was self-righteous, dividing his own offspring, he was the mind of Adam to overcome. By this, there is an accuser (Satan) there to deny access to the tree of life. The flaming sword is what you encountered as the dweller on the threshold (Between heaven and hell).

You must overcome yourself first. To do this, you follow the path of Christ. Giving is the key to suffering for others. Once you realize your place in the tree of life as a branch of the whole, you are self-realized. From this, you love others and can never harm them. Your fear is conquered by denying the accuser his accusation.

You have overcome the dweller. Presently, you are still locked in fear and disbelief that a larger reality exists.

Look up the term.

Here is the peer reviewed version as a citation. Read the lyrics.



Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-01-2015, 10:09 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:06 PM)AlephBet Wrote:  
(11-01-2015 09:46 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  Long ago, before I realized I was atheist, I was looking into where my beliefs were taking me. I researched ways to find out more about myself, my psyche, and my "soul." I discovered a modified version of tratak, a type of meditation. This one used a mirror. No, I won't explain exactly what the method was; you'll see why not.

Before now, only a handful of people ever about me having a vision. I won't go into great detail, since I reserve that for a very few people in my life (so far, only three). Also, just thinking about it sends shivers up my spine.

I performed this meditation many times, each time getting a little closer and a little deeper. After a long time, I was no longer in the mirror, just the wall behind me. Only my eyes remained. Then the vision started. It wasn't the nice, sweet, enlightening vision you normally hear about. Mine was full of horrible, frightening images. They all looked real. Not in a dreamy ethereal fog, but as if everything was happening right there in front of me. Since that vision, no images of demons or any image in a horror movie or any photograph of a crime scene scare me. However, to this day, I hate mirrors. Not in a normal way; I want to smash almost every mirror I come across.

But here's the thing: Even then, I didn't believe that it was sent from any divine being. I believed, as I do now, that it all came from inside my own brain. It wasn't some sort of collective consciousness or universal energy that I had tapped into. I just merely had some sort of waking realistic "dream." I never once thought some deity or deities had deemed me worthy of their connection.

Nothing to this day has convinced or will convince me that this vision made me special to any supernatural being or force. It was concocted by my own neurons. The only regret I have is that I didn't do this with some sort of brain scan going on.

That's why when I hear of people having prophetic dreams or visions, I still don't believe them. Been there, done that. And who would have thought that an atheist would have a vision, huh?

You met the dweller on the theshold. This is a vision of yourself in your current state of mind. The scriptures related to this (Upanishads) note that you must be prepared (righteous) in order to get past the dweller.

In the Bible, the dweller for Adam is Yahweh. All of Mankind is a mirror of the Son of God. Before Jesus could silence Satan, the higher mind was required to do this as Yahweh. Jesus then did it when he met Satan in the Desert.

Zachariah 3

3 And he shewed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him.

2 And the Lord said unto Satan, The Lord rebuke thee, O Satan; even the Lord that hath chosen Jerusalem rebuke thee: is not this a brand plucked out of the fire?

3 Now Joshua was clothed with filthy garments, and stood before the angel.

4 And he answered and spake unto those that stood before him, saying, Take away the filthy garments from him. And unto him he said, Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment.

The dweller is your own fear. Just as Yahweh was self-righteous, dividing his own offspring, he was the mind of Adam to overcome. By this, there is an accuser (Satan) there to deny access to the tree of life. The flaming sword is what you encountered as the dweller on the threshold (Between heaven and hell).

You must overcome yourself first. To do this, you follow the path of Christ. Giving is the key to suffering for others. Once you realize your place in the tree of life as a branch of the whole, you are self-realized. From this, you love others and can never harm them. Your fear is conquered by denying the accuser his accusation.

You have overcome the dweller. Presently, you are still locked in fear and disbelief that a larger reality exists.

Look up the term.

Here is the peer reviewed version as a citation. Read the lyrics.




Great song, stupid post.

Check out my now-defunct atheism blog. It's just a blog, no ads, no revenue, no gods.
----
Atheism promotes critical thinking; theism promotes hypocritical thinking. -- Me
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-01-2015, 10:11 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:09 PM)WillHopp Wrote:  
(11-01-2015 10:06 PM)AlephBet Wrote:  You met the dweller on the theshold. This is a vision of yourself in your current state of mind. The scriptures related to this (Upanishads) note that you must be prepared (righteous) in order to get past the dweller.

In the Bible, the dweller for Adam is Yahweh. All of Mankind is a mirror of the Son of God. Before Jesus could silence Satan, the higher mind was required to do this as Yahweh. Jesus then did it when he met Satan in the Desert.

Zachariah 3

3 And he shewed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him.

2 And the Lord said unto Satan, The Lord rebuke thee, O Satan; even the Lord that hath chosen Jerusalem rebuke thee: is not this a brand plucked out of the fire?

3 Now Joshua was clothed with filthy garments, and stood before the angel.

4 And he answered and spake unto those that stood before him, saying, Take away the filthy garments from him. And unto him he said, Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment.

The dweller is your own fear. Just as Yahweh was self-righteous, dividing his own offspring, he was the mind of Adam to overcome. By this, there is an accuser (Satan) there to deny access to the tree of life. The flaming sword is what you encountered as the dweller on the threshold (Between heaven and hell).

You must overcome yourself first. To do this, you follow the path of Christ. Giving is the key to suffering for others. Once you realize your place in the tree of life as a branch of the whole, you are self-realized. From this, you love others and can never harm them. Your fear is conquered by denying the accuser his accusation.

You have overcome the dweller. Presently, you are still locked in fear and disbelief that a larger reality exists.

Look up the term.

Here is the peer reviewed version as a citation. Read the lyrics.




Great song, stupid post.

Deny ignorance. Learn what the song is about and like it even more. By this, you will then like me and yourself. You will see no difference.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-01-2015, 10:12 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:11 PM)AlephBet Wrote:  
(11-01-2015 10:09 PM)WillHopp Wrote:  Great song, stupid post.

Deny ignorance. Learn what the song is about and like it even more.





My Youtube channel if anyone is interested.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEkRdbq...rLEz-0jEHQ
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-01-2015, 10:13 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
I know what the song is about. I'm fully aware of Van Morrison's inspirational music. But you're a loon.

Check out my now-defunct atheism blog. It's just a blog, no ads, no revenue, no gods.
----
Atheism promotes critical thinking; theism promotes hypocritical thinking. -- Me
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like WillHopp's post
11-01-2015, 10:15 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 09:46 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  Long ago, before I realized I was atheist, I was looking into where my beliefs were taking me. I researched ways to find out more about myself, my psyche, and my "soul." I discovered a modified version of tratak, a type of meditation. This one used a mirror. No, I won't explain exactly what the method was; you'll see why not.

Before now, only a handful of people ever about me having a vision. I won't go into great detail, since I reserve that for a very few people in my life (so far, only three). Also, just thinking about it sends shivers up my spine.

I performed this meditation many times, each time getting a little closer and a little deeper. After a long time, I was no longer in the mirror, just the wall behind me. Only my eyes remained. Then the vision started. It wasn't the nice, sweet, enlightening vision you normally hear about. Mine was full of horrible, frightening images. They all looked real. Not in a dreamy ethereal fog, but as if everything was happening right there in front of me. Since that vision, no images of demons or any image in a horror movie or any photograph of a crime scene scare me. However, to this day, I hate mirrors. Not in a normal way; I want to smash almost every mirror I come across.

But here's the thing: Even then, I didn't believe that it was sent from any divine being. I believed, as I do now, that it all came from inside my own brain. It wasn't some sort of collective consciousness or universal energy that I had tapped into. I just merely had some sort of waking realistic "dream." I never once thought some deity or deities had deemed me worthy of their connection.

Nothing to this day has convinced or will convince me that this vision made me special to any supernatural being or force. It was concocted by my own neurons. The only regret I have is that I didn't do this with some sort of brain scan going on.

That's why when I hear of people having prophetic dreams or visions, I still don't believe them. Been there, done that. And who would have thought that an atheist would have a vision, huh?

If you can get into the right state of mind -- it's kinda cool in a scary way.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Momsurroundedbyboys's post
11-01-2015, 10:18 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:11 PM)AlephBet Wrote:  
(11-01-2015 10:09 PM)WillHopp Wrote:  Great song, stupid post.

Deny ignorance. Learn what the song is about and like it even more. By this, you will then like me and yourself. You will see no difference.

From his liner notes and Wiki:
The album sleeve states that the lyrics on this song and part of "Aryan Mist" were inspired by the 1950 publication, Glamour —A World Problem by Alice Bailey and the Tibetan master, Djwal Khul, as described in Van Morrison's liner notes for the album. According to the teachings of Bailey, there are a series of what she calls "glamours" which are mental illusions creating a fog that veils the spiritual wanderer from seeing the world as it truly is. He becomes illuminated as a "dweller on the threshold" when the "Angel of Presence" purifies the soul with light.

Check out my now-defunct atheism blog. It's just a blog, no ads, no revenue, no gods.
----
Atheism promotes critical thinking; theism promotes hypocritical thinking. -- Me
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like WillHopp's post
11-01-2015, 10:23 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:13 PM)WillHopp Wrote:  I know what the song is about. I'm fully aware of Van Morrison's inspirational music. But you're a loon.

Judge yourself in my reflection. You will eventually see yourself in it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-01-2015, 10:25 PM
RE: Why I Doubted My Own Vision
(11-01-2015 10:18 PM)WillHopp Wrote:  
(11-01-2015 10:11 PM)AlephBet Wrote:  Deny ignorance. Learn what the song is about and like it even more. By this, you will then like me and yourself. You will see no difference.

From his liner notes and Wiki:
The album sleeve states that the lyrics on this song and part of "Aryan Mist" were inspired by the 1950 publication, Glamour —A World Problem by Alice Bailey and the Tibetan master, Djwal Khul, as described in Van Morrison's liner notes for the album. According to the teachings of Bailey, there are a series of what she calls "glamours" which are mental illusions creating a fog that veils the spiritual wanderer from seeing the world as it truly is. He becomes illuminated as a "dweller on the threshold" when the "Angel of Presence" purifies the soul with light.

The residual self-image. Yes. See yourself yet?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: