Why a hard approach in trying to convey a message?
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26-05-2011, 01:49 PM
RE: Why a hard approach in trying to convey a message?
I use a gentle leader also. I have a German Shepard who had a biological mess and almost lost his life as a puppy, so instead of training him I spent the time saving his life. When he was finally well, he was huge and out of control. The vet gave me the gentle leader and it works like a charm. I don't care if others judge how it looks, it works for us and Ranger loves it now- it means we are going for a walk! Big Grin
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26-05-2011, 09:51 PM
RE: Why a hard approach in trying to convey a message?
(26-05-2011 01:33 PM)TrainWreck Wrote:  You're putting me to sleep . . .
It's amazing how much detail we will put in to something that we are confident of our expertize - isn't it?

Unbelievable, I didn't even read this post until I finished ripping you to shreds over on the other thread. It amazes me just how sharp I am with this reason stuff.

"howling as opposed to barking"

It's sad really. Do you let your insecurities spill into every aspect of your life, or do you just do it in the safety of your online persona? I attempt to use my expertise to help people. You use your (alleged) area of expertise as a crutch to hold up your very large and oh-so-fragile ego.

BTW, do you really think you "ripped me to shreds"??

Perhaps it is time for you to move on you sad little man.

So many cats, so few good recipes.
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27-05-2011, 01:00 AM
RE: Why a hard approach in trying to convey a message?
(22-04-2011 02:48 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  A dog walking without restraint in any way is a very risky proposition. Only the very best trained dog with an extremely well educated handler should have a dog unrestrained in a situation that could cause harm to the dog or others. There are exceptions to this of course, but as a general rule, I teach my clients to always use a lead, since it is their most effective means of communication.

Now a bit of a brag. My border collie is the best trained dog I've ever encountered. She can understand me simply through head nods, and has proven her ability to focus even in the most unbelievable situations. She knows well over 100 verbal commands (the myth that a dog can only learn a certain number is just that. A myth), and dozens of hand signals. In fact, she will go to something simply by following my eyes. My point is, the leash shouldn't be your ONLY means of communication, but it is an indispensible one in any uncontrolled environment.

Thanks for your excellent information and advice, exactly what I was told many years ago when I lived across the street from a gentleman who raised and trained dogs. I was in high school at the time and had a very unruly black lab and his instructions helped me to have an obedient and well trained friend instead of an obnoxious mutt.

He and his wife had three german shepherd dogs that were used extensively in films and advertising. I don't know how many verbal commands they understood, but I would not have been surprised to learn it was in the neighborhood of 100. It's been some 40 years now and I can't remember any of the exact commands, but I recall being very surprised at how much the dogs seemed to understand. They also were able to convey commands with a silent movement of their heads. I, in my turn, was happy to have a dog that walked at my side on leash and who would stay when I told him to.

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read." Groucho Marx
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