Why do primates...
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24-03-2013, 02:53 PM
Why do primates...
As being part of evolotion, why do I LOVE my children? I mean, I would do anything for them. Is it an instinct for survival? Like if love was not existant, then children would have a worse outcome. I look at my 3 girls, and think, wow, this is the best thing since sliced bread. But reallly.....what is it? I would lay my life down for them in a heartbeart! They drive me up the wall sometimes, but I feel like my life would not be so enriched without them. I just get this amazing, indiscribable feeling when I see them.

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24-03-2013, 03:04 PM
RE: Why do primates...
(24-03-2013 02:53 PM)CaffinatedPuppy Wrote:  As being part of evolotion, why do I LOVE my children? I mean, I would do anything for them. Is it an instinct for survival? Like if love was not existant, then children would have a worse outcome. I look at my 3 girls, and think, wow, this is the best thing since sliced bread. But reallly.....what is it? I would lay my life down for them in a heartbeart! They drive me up the wall sometimes, but I feel like my life would not be so enriched without them. I just get this amazing, indiscribable feeling when I see them.


I have thought of this several times before, but I have not really researched it, but I have thought of a vague explanation which did somewhat satisfy me.

I had it figured that the love and desire to protect ones children was a warping of the survival instinct:

Survival and procreation tend to be the hight of unconscious need strived toward, once one has children both instincts are weakened and redirected toward the protection and survival of the children as opposed to the self, this change in focus allows a better chance of survival of the progeny, which allows for a better chance of your genes being passed on successfully.
Of course this removes emotion and empathetic system from the equation which likely also effect the desire.

However, this explanation fails to fully satisfy me; I have yet to come up with anything similar to a mechanism by which the instinctual change takes place..

So, who's next?

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
"Anti-environmentalism is like standing in front of a forest and going 'quick kill them they're coming right for us!'" - Jake Farr-Wharton, The Imaginary Friend Show.
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24-03-2013, 03:06 PM
RE: Why do primates...
It does come down to evolution. If love boils down to what we can physically understand about it, (being our reaction to the release of chemicals in the brain and whatnot, I'm not an expert) than it makes sense that our brains evolved to give those who best took care of their offspring the best chance at survival. Humans are not very capable of taking care of ourselves at a young age, compared to most other animal species. So it makes sense that we form a very strong attachment to our kin, giving them the best chance to make it to adulthood, and therefore survive and procreate.
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24-03-2013, 03:07 PM
RE: Why do primates...
The magazine "Psychology Today" has published an informative article concerning this topic.

You can read it here.

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24-03-2013, 03:07 PM
RE: Why do primates...
okay freethought, you hit enter before me. What he said.
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24-03-2013, 04:33 PM
RE: Why do primates...
So you don't kill them when they cry or eat them while they're asleep and vulnerable.

So many links and paragraphs and explanations and it was really just that simple. Dodgy

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24-03-2013, 05:10 PM
RE: Why do primates...
The ability to have affection for offspring is a mammalian trait. Think of the parenting strategy for most reptiles: drop eggs and leave. They normally have so many offspring that it would be impossible to care for each and everyone of them. The offspring is also born self-sufficient, meaning that--barring predators--they can survive on their own. Mammals, on the other hand, have fewer offspring, and they tend to be less resilient than reptiles. Primates are a good example of this. We typically give birth to one offspring at a time. Baby apes are strong enough to hold onto their mothers while they forage, but they still need mom to care for them until they are strong enough to survive on their own. As you know, human babies are born even weaker. This means more parental investment is required to ensure the survival of our progeny.
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24-03-2013, 06:17 PM
RE: Why do primates...
I love this magazine. I used to subscribe to it.
(24-03-2013 03:07 PM)Vosur Wrote:  The magazine "Psychology Today" has published an informative article concerning this topic.

You can read it here.

“You just go where your high-top sneakers sneak, and don't forget to use your head.”
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24-03-2013, 06:24 PM
RE: Why do primates...
In young infants, there is a reflex grasp that all babies have (the death grip) They say this may have been from when we were pre-human, and that the babies reflex grasp was to cling onto the mothers hair on her back to keep from falling from trees. All baby humans have an instinct to walk, even a few hours after being born. If you hold them upright, they will put one foot in front of the other when forced. They also can hold their breath underwater, an insticnt also based off of survival, and float for a few seconds.

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24-03-2013, 06:27 PM
RE: Why do primates...
What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Don't hurt me, no more.... Heart

“You just go where your high-top sneakers sneak, and don't forget to use your head.”
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