Why do we protect endangered animals?
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06-05-2012, 02:45 AM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
Since no one seems to have brought this up (maybe because I might be wrong) I will. There's a natural order (as mentioned by others) that relates to the cycle of how nutrients and resources are consumed and recycled. If we continue to act as though our hunting hobbies and toxic industrial developments are a reflection of natural selection, we will eventually kill off most of the tertiary, quaternary, or apex predators. These predators serve a role to maintain the health of the ecosystem (I wont explain how since I don't want to bore y'all). In addition, low-level predators serve their own purpose as well. Imagine if pandas are extinct leaving few animals to eat the bamboo; it will continue to grow vigorously (this is a hypothetical situation and is untrue, but it serves to express a concept).

Think about it in a different way; population of lower-level consumers always need to be controlled either by microorganisms or lack of nutrition. If you don't see the importance of this idea than relate to the human population. We are constantly increasing in numbers in a way that, I feel, is not maintainable by the earth due to the lack of resources. It sounds cynical but I sometimes feel that we shouldn't try so hard to save each others lives. It's just a radical thought that I've pondered from time to time and do not truly believe; but how can we live if most of the world is as dense as China in the future.

I like your point that the gap will be filled but that's not a guarantee. Microorganisms that kill off certain species, in recent times, are introduced by humans. We are the breeding grounds to these pathogenic viruses and bacteria so why are we being inconsiderate and say "that's your fault for not developing an immunity to a pathogen that I introduced." Mutations take a while to occur; our immunities aren't a cause of mutation but of existing intelligence (only possessed by us) to utilize weakened or similar-but-not-pathogenic versions of the organism. You can't seriously expect other animals to have such a luxury.

But the point that I really want to make is that human habits are not really "natural" (in my opinion anyways) since it's unseen in nature before our arrival. If tigers are endangered, it is a sign of an imbalance in the ecosystem causing it to be unsustainable for stable life in the long-run. Yeah, I believe Pandas are being saved mainly because of their cuteness but the concept of ensuring the survival of endangered species is important for the natural order. Much like time travelers should not mess with the past, humans should not severely interrupt the ecosystem. (Man, I hate that I sound so much like an environmentalist)

Sorry if I went a little off topic. I just noticed that the same answer is repeatedly being given.
I've started to question the legitimacy of natural selection in the human era. If we so hardheadedly believe in it, what do we make of mutations in our society like down syndrome or cystic fibrosis?
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06-05-2012, 05:06 PM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
(06-05-2012 02:45 AM)dxnguyen89 Wrote:  I've started to question the legitimacy of natural selection in the human era. If we so hardheadedly believe in it, what do we make of mutations in our society like down syndrome or cystic fibrosis?
Not "hardheadedly", I meant "wholeheartedly".
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09-05-2012, 05:29 PM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
Animals are not here solely for our benefit. The animals we see were here long before we started screaming "Ooga-Booga" at one another.
One species feeds others directly while others graze and their manure replenishes the soil.

Wiping out one species of fish deliberately can unbalance the systems of others....I could go on but if we are directly influencing the demise of other species then we, as supposedly intelligent beings, have a responsibility to rectify the situation.

While I agree that we tend to spend a disproportionate amount of time and money to save species instead of our own kind, I think we need to protect animals form cruelty and exploitation.

Humankind cannot gain anything without first giving something in return.
To obtain, something of equal value must be lost.
That is Alchemy's first law of Equivalent Exchange.
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09-05-2012, 05:36 PM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
Hey, Dragon.

Quote:Animals are not here solely for our benefit.

True dat.

I don't quite get your use of the word disproportionate. Based on system unbalancing, I'd think you'd want to spend more. Can you clarify what you mean?

Peace and Love and Empathy,

Matt
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18-05-2012, 02:50 PM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
we tend to spend a disproportionate amount of time and money to save species instead of our own kind

I was referring to what we spend or don't spend to save our own kind.
Don't misunderstand, I like animals and I do think we should try to help them if their demise is largely because of us but to try and save a dying species like cheetahs, for example, doesn't make sense.
Many animals slowly die off because of competition, it happened to the sabre-toothed tiger, the dire wolf and others.

It didn't mean they were "inferior" but rather the whole dynamics keep changing and sometimes those very specific, evolutionary advantages ended up being the key to their demise 'cause they couldn't adapt well or fast enough.

Humankind cannot gain anything without first giving something in return.
To obtain, something of equal value must be lost.
That is Alchemy's first law of Equivalent Exchange.
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08-01-2013, 05:21 AM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
One day the Sun will explode in a supernova. All life on Earth will be destroyed. It will be irrelevant how many Panda's we preserved, all life is doomed.

The only possibility of any life surviving the supernova is if humans develop the ability to colonize other planets. As the only species capable of surviving beyond the life span of our solar system I feel we have the right to do whatever we want with planet Earth.
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10-01-2013, 12:03 AM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
Any money spent on the Panda is completely wasted. Some species just can't be helped, and this is one of them.

They are asleep 21 hours a day! That's just 3 hours away from being dead already! Their stomachs are so poor at digesting the one food they will eat, that they have to spend the rest of the day eating. The females are only fertile a few days a year, and they have little interest in sex regardless. This only leaves a window of a few hours out of a year that they can reproduce. Also the males only have a 3 inch wang! The have twins often, but the mothers are known for killing the cubs.

Fuck Pandas!
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10-01-2013, 04:51 AM (This post was last modified: 12-01-2013 04:56 AM by Hafnof.)
Re: Why do we protect endangered animals?



Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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11-01-2013, 11:20 AM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
I can understand why certain species are designated as "Endangered", but what I don't understand is reluctance shown by many governments when it comes to Hunting these species. For years, I have been trying to negotiate with the China's Department of the Interior to let me hunt a wild Panda. I realize the Panda is an endangered species, so I (and the company I work for) have offered China up to 1 Million Dollars for the privilige to hunt one of the Pandas (a big male, preferably). It is thought that any damage inflicted on the wild population of Pandas due to the hunt could be quickly and more than adequatly remedied by the 1 Million-dollar fee. As a result, the Panda population would be stronger than before.

But will the Chinese Game Comisioners listen to our proposal? Hell no! They won't even take the time to review it! As a result, we will forever be without a fine Panda trophey, and all the cool film footage of the hunting expedition.

Our Company had even reserved a place for our stuffed Panda Trophy - we were going to place it right between our stuffed African Oryx and our Bonobo trophies. Well...one can only dream. BTW...our company is quite generous and conservation-minded. I mean, we paid the Republic of the Congo more than 3 Million Dollars for the Bonobo-hunting rights - and what a fine expedition that was! As a result, the Bonobo we harvested was quickly replaced by 3 young adults acquired from eastern-European zoos.
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11-01-2013, 11:26 AM
RE: Why do we protect endangered animals?
(11-01-2013 11:20 AM)Julius Wrote:  I can understand why certain species are designated as "Endangered", but what I don't understand is reluctance shown by many governments when it comes to Hunting these species. For years, I have been trying to negotiate with the China's Department of the Interior to let me hunt a wild Panda. I realize the Panda is an endangered species, so I (and the company I work for) have offered China up to 1 Million Dollars for the privilige to hunt one of the Pandas (a big male, preferably). It is thought that any damage inflicted on the wild population of Pandas due to the hunt could be quickly and more than adequatly remedied by the 1 Million-dollar fee. As a result, the Panda population would be stronger than before.

But will the Chinese Game Comisioners listen to our proposal? Hell no! They won't even take the time to review it! As a result, we will forever be without a fine Panda trophey, and all the cool film footage of the hunting expedition.

Our Company had even reserved a place for our stuffed Panda Trophy - we were going to place it right between our stuffed African Oryx and our Bonobo trophies. Well...one can only dream. BTW...our company is quite generous and conservation-minded. I mean, we paid the Republic of the Congo more than 3 Million Dollars for the Bonobo-hunting rights - and what a fine expedition that was! As a result, the Bonobo we harvested was quickly replaced by 3 young adults acquired from eastern-European zoos.


This is satire, right? Consider

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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