Why is it ok to hate fat people?
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24-04-2012, 09:04 PM (This post was last modified: 24-04-2012 09:32 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 08:08 AM)TrainWreck Wrote:  In my contemplations I believe that I lack better fitness, because of the lack, or inadequacy, of health/cooking/nutrition education in my elementary schooling; ...

What the fuck? You want better fitness, lift big ass rocks up off the ground. Squats and deadlifts alone are more than enough to keep you fit, they'll also make you fucking strong. Wink ... Only reason to blame your schoolin' is if they didn't have you lift up big ass rocks as part of your physical education.

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Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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24-04-2012, 09:39 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
Hey Ghost,
I actually found myself agreeing with your entire post.

Am I high, or are you?

Big Grin

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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24-04-2012, 09:51 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 05:01 PM)Ghost Wrote:  HOLY SHIT!

I fucking blink and there's six pages of posts!

Well I sure as shit ain't responding to all of them. So I'll say this.
...
Indians are drunks.
...

Speaking as 1/8 Kickapoo, there might be something genetic happening there. ... But no excuses. Wink

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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24-04-2012, 09:54 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 09:51 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(24-04-2012 05:01 PM)Ghost Wrote:  HOLY SHIT!

I fucking blink and there's six pages of posts!

Well I sure as shit ain't responding to all of them. So I'll say this.
...
Indians are drunks.
...

Speaking as 1/8 Kickapoo, there might be something genetic happening there. ... But no excuses. Wink
You're part Kickapoo? I thought you were part Peek-a-boo.

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It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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24-04-2012, 09:59 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 09:54 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  
(24-04-2012 09:51 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  Speaking as 1/8 Kickapoo, there might be something genetic happening there. ... But no excuses. Wink
You're part Kickapoo? I thought you were part Peek-a-boo.

[Image: Jj_fundoshi_6.jpg]

I feel an uncontrollable urge to take your head beneath my arm and give you a proper nuggie. Once you you are in that vulnerable position I will be hard pressed to not give you a proper wedgie just for the hell of it. Wink

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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24-04-2012, 10:38 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
[Image: comatme.gif]

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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24-04-2012, 11:09 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
You people are so easy to derail.

Why is it ok to hate fat people? Because you can hate whoever the fuck you want for whatever reason you fucking want.

Doesn't make it right, but it's ok. God knows I hate my fair share of people for various reasons, none so shallow as someone's weight but it's hate none the less.

Freedom of emotion. Is it ok to ridicule people because of their weight? No. Not unless it's ok for them to punch you in the face when you're done. Then it's cool. But those terms should be agreed upon before beginning.

"I think of myself as an intelligent, sensitive human being with the soul of a clown which always forces me to blow it at the most important moments." -Jim Morrison
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24-04-2012, 11:57 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 09:59 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  I feel an uncontrollable urge to take your head beneath my arm and give you a proper nuggie. Once you you are in that vulnerable position I will be hard pressed to not give you a proper wedgie just for the hell of it. Wink

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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25-04-2012, 12:49 AM (This post was last modified: 25-04-2012 12:55 AM by Quidsane.)
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
(24-04-2012 05:01 PM)Ghost Wrote:  Stereotyping is a generalisation of all members of a group that are unwarranted and unfounded.

The problem with sterotype, prejudice and discrimination is that ALL OF THEM are based on a FICTION.


Well, there's the social definition and then there's the scientific definition.

The word theory is like that, too.
We've heard many a willfully ignorant christian say, "Evolution is only a theory." [Image: help.gif]

The problem with the above statements, in terms of the definition of the word stereotype,
is that according to this article in Psychology Today, they are scientifically false.


What people call “stereotypes” are what scientists call “empirical generalizations,” and they are the foundation of scientific theory. That’s what scientists do; they make generalizations. Many stereotypes are empirical generalizations with a statistical basis and thus on average tend to be true. If they are not true, they wouldn’t be stereotypes. The only problem with stereotypes and empirical generalizations is that they are not always true for all individual cases. They are generalizations, not invariant laws. There are always individual exceptions to stereotypes and empirical generalizations. The danger lies in applying the empirical generalizations to individual cases, which may or may not be exceptions. But these individual exceptions do not invalidate the generalizations.

An observation, if true, becomes an empirical generalization until someone objects to it, and then it becomes a stereotype. For example, the statement “Men are taller than women” is an empirical generalization. It is in general true, but there are individual exceptions. There are many men who are shorter than the average woman, and there are many women who are taller than the average man, but these exceptions do not make the generalization untrue. Men on average are taller than women in every human society (and, by the way, there are evolutionary psychological explanations for this phenomenon, known as the sexual dimorphism in size, but that’s perhaps for a future post). Everybody knows this, but nobody calls it a stereotype because it is not unkind to anybody. Men in general like being taller than women, and women in general like being shorter than men.

However, as soon as one turns this around and makes a slightly different, yet equally true, observation that “Women are fatter than men,” it becomes a stereotype because nobody, least of all women, wants to be considered fat. But it is true nonetheless; women have a higher percentage of body fat than men throughout the life course (and there are evolutionary reasons for this as well). Once again, there are numerous individual exceptions, but the generalization still holds true at the population level.

Stereotypes and empirical generalizations are neither good nor bad, desirable nor undesirable, moral nor immoral. They just are. Stereotypes do not tell us how to behave or treat other people (or groups of people). Stereotypes are observations about the empirical world, not behavioral prescriptions. One may not infer how to treat people from empirical observations about them. Stereotypes tell us what groups of people tend to be or do in general; they do not tell us how we ought to treat them. Once again, there is no place for “ought” in science.

From All stereotypes are true, except... I: What are stereotypes?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also, here is a fascinating article that discusses, among other things, the dual phenomenons of Stereotype Threat and Stereotype Lift:


Stereotype Threat
occurs when someone feels threatened by the possibility of confirming a negative stereotype about their group. Ironically, this concern leads to decreased performance, which in turn confirms the stereotype that the person was hoping to avoid. An example of stereotype threat is a when a woman, who considers herself good at math but is aware of the stereotype that women can’t do math, takes a difficult math test. When she encounters difficult questions and experiences frustration, she doesn’t want others to think she is struggling because she is a woman. She feels increased pressure to perform well, which actually works against her and makes her perform worse.

The second phenomenon that reinforces stereotypical behavior is called Stereotype Lift. Walton and Cohen (2003) found that men’s scores were higher on math tests that were described as showing previous gender differences in performance compared to tests that were described as showing no previous gender differences. In other words, men experienced a boost in performance when gender stereotypes were relevant to the situation, compared to when they were irrelevant. Downward Social Comparison , a process whereby people elevate their self-esteem by comparing their group to a lower-status group, is thought to be the basis for this lift in performance. Men are able to boost their self-esteem and improve their math performance by comparing themselves to women, who are stereotypically believed to be worse at math than men. They may think to themselves, this test is difficult but at least I know I am better at math than women. However, when stereotypes are made irrelevant to the given test, men are no longer able to use this line of thinking to boost their self-esteem.

Together, decreases in women’s scores caused by Stereotype Threat combined with increases in men’s scores caused by Stereotype Lift work together to exaggerate the performance differences found between men and women in math domains. These exaggerated performance differences confirm and perpetuate the stereotype that women can’t do math, and the cycle of Stereotype Threat and Stereotype Lift continues with even greater fervor. It is a vicious cycle: the stereotype causes gender differences in math performance; these differences in performance confirm the stereotype; the stereotype grows stronger and is even more likely to produce exaggerated group differences. As a result of the seemingly inevitability of male superiority in math domains, fewer women enter math-related jobs and college courses because they view their efforts as futile. They may think to themselves, what’s the use of pursuing a career in math if I’m not genetically wired to do math and will always be outperformed by my male colleagues? Instead, they may seek self-worth from success in areas in which women are not negatively stereotyped. The small number of women in math-related fields further confirms and perpetuates the stereotype. It seems to be a never-ending cycle, but the negative effects of stereotypes are not inevitable. First, certain factors must be present for Stereotype Threat to occur, and second, the negative effects of Stereotype Threat can be prevented.

From Are Stereotypes True?

Just some food for thought.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As far as laser-focused hatred is concerned, I'll put my cards on the table.
I absolutely hate hate hate willfully ignorant people.
This will never change.
Peace.
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25-04-2012, 01:08 PM
RE: Why is it ok to hate fat people?
Supitty sup sup, Erxomai?

Maybe we're both high!

Sup, Quidsane?

I gotta say, it's not that I want to invalidate what Kanazawa said, but I think it's slightly out of context. Sure, sexual dimorphism means that on average, men are bigger than women and yes that's a stereotype. But there's a pretty big difference between that kind of empirical generalisation and something like, say, niggers are lazy. There's very little empirical evidence involved in that particular "observation". Stereotypes can very easily stem from anecdotes rather than formal empirical study. I do agree with him that stereotypes simply are. The point is to recognise when things are generalisations and that individuals can and do vary SO THAT we don't fall into the pattern of prejudging and being discriminatory.

Also, the bit about people not liking the generalisation MAKES it a stereotype seems wonky.

Hey, Germany.

While I enjoyed Cedric's monologue, I'm reasonably certain that if I go to the moon, I will not be asking
"sup, nigga" out the rolled down window of my George Clinton P-Funk
blasting Cadillac space shuttle with the pimp ass grills. I'm also adept
at parallel parking with my music blasting.



That's why it's funny. Not because the stereotype is true, but because
it is not true. Comedy works by either
playing up the
stereotype
, or
playing against the
stereotype
.



Hey, Thomas.



Then it's a good thing I wasn't talking to you Cool



Peace and Love and Empathy,



Matt
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