Why is the Earth named the Earth?
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01-12-2014, 04:02 PM
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
(01-12-2014 03:59 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  It must suck to be the new kid on the block with everything already named for somebody else. Poor christians.

Well, they have St Patrick's Day and Halloween and Christmas (at least until we win the war on that :facepalmSmile.

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01-12-2014, 04:28 PM
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
(01-12-2014 03:59 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  It must suck to be the new kid on the block with everything already named for somebody else. Poor christians.

Are you kidding? Jesus as had every date since his approximate birth named after him!

Of course, we're in the process of taking that away too by changing Anno Domini to Common Era Thumbsup

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01-12-2014, 08:19 PM
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
Makes me wonder what types of names the Old Germans, Celts, and Norsemen had given the planets. Did they give those specific bodies the same veneration as their Gods? Perhaps they had other random attributions to give them. If they did that it must be a trend that goes at least as far back to the Indo-Europeans.

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01-12-2014, 09:27 PM
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
The Dirt was already taken. Big Grin
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01-12-2014, 09:53 PM
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
(01-12-2014 11:13 AM)Can_of_Beans Wrote:  The other planets are named after Greek and Roman gods, so why isn't the Earth named that way also?

Over the Thanksgiving weekend I learned it's because that's what God called it. The other planets were created after the Earth, so he let us name those.

"In the beginning, God created the heavens and the Earth."

Apparently that somehow counts as indisputable evidence for creationism, so checkmate atheists. Facepalm

My guess as to why Earth is named after the ground is that for much of human history, we've been deeply ignorant about the Earth's true nature as an object in space; it's always been viewed as our own little realm while the stars and planets were celestial, they belonged to the heavens, a far removed realm.

I figure that the association of Earth not being of celestial nature fuelled the name.

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02-12-2014, 11:01 AM (This post was last modified: 02-12-2014 11:04 AM by cjlr.)
RE: Why is the Earth named the Earth?
(01-12-2014 08:19 PM)ClydeLee Wrote:  Makes me wonder what types of names the Old Germans, Celts, and Norsemen had given the planets. Did they give those specific bodies the same veneration as their Gods? Perhaps they had other random attributions to give them. If they did that it must be a trend that goes at least as far back to the Indo-Europeans.

We don't know what astrological significance the early Celtic or proto-Germanic people gave, well, anything.

By the time they were literate - or even engaging with literate peoples - the (for lack of a better word) stock planet/god associations were in place; what we know is all filtered through Graeco-Roman sources. And by Norse times this was a tradition already centuries old!

Hence, as it happens, our days of the week. Tiwaz (later English Tiw, Norse Tyr) for Mars on Tuesday, Wodenaz (Woden, Odin) for Mercury on Wednesday, Thunraz (Donar, Thor) for Jupiter on Thursday, and Frawjon (Frigg, Freyja) for Venus on Friday. We have Saturday directly for Saturn in part because of his role in agriculture, which the proto-Germanic peoples didn't really have; indeed, the Norse didn't call it that at all.

(german names for roman gods according to babylonian timekeeping filtered through jews; makes perfect sense...)

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