Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
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08-11-2015, 05:49 PM
Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
Why was the pagan holiday of the winter solstice renamed to Christmas?

"If you cannot explain it simply, you don't understand it enough" -Albert Einstein
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08-11-2015, 06:04 PM (This post was last modified: 09-11-2015 10:07 AM by onlinebiker.)
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
To keep the natives happy.....

The Catholic church is very good at incorporating local religious practices into their own to "convert" new areas......

A good example, a friend of mine who was in the Peace Corps in the Solomon Islands told me about......

The natives had a maternalistic type religion before the Catholics set up a mission --- so there, they had "The Father, The Son, and The Holy Mama"........ I actually seen a picture that he'd taken of a local church -- that had that legend emblazoned above the entrance....

.......................................

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09-11-2015, 08:12 AM
Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
So is it officially a Christian holiday no that it has been renamed (and no longer a pagan holiday)?

"If you cannot explain it simply, you don't understand it enough" -Albert Einstein
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09-11-2015, 08:22 AM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
It's easier to change a culture over time than erase it. The same thing happened to Easter, Halloween, and may other holidays and traditions. Believe it or not, egg laying rabbits don't actually have anything to do with Jesus. But finding a way to allow people to maintain some of their traditions while modifying the context in which those traditions were practiced allowed for the subversion or assimilation of countless cultures without having to simply kill them all.

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09-11-2015, 08:39 AM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
(09-11-2015 08:22 AM)yakherder Wrote:  It's easier to change a culture over time than erase it. The same thing happened to Easter, Halloween, and may other holidays and traditions. Believe it or not, egg laying rabbits don't actually have anything to do with Jesus. But finding a way to allow people to maintain some of their traditions while modifying the context in which those traditions were practiced allowed for the subversion or assimilation of countless cultures without having to simply kill them all.

I love bringing this up when people freak out that Easter and Christmas are becoming too secular. They're not their holidays, and I'm not remotely interested in the Christian halves of either of them.

Of course, I've seen a push by the fundies to say that this isn't the case. They love rewriting history.
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09-11-2015, 08:44 AM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
(09-11-2015 08:12 AM)smileXsmileXsmile Wrote:  So is it officially a Christian holiday no that it has been renamed (and no longer a pagan holiday)?

Slightly off-topic here, but I don't like to use the word pagan to describe pre-Christian religious beliefs. The latin word paganus was synonymous with the English word farmer, but could also be used to describe a simple villager or any old country person regardless of profession. Thus, you could also describe the word pagan as synonymous with 'hick', 'bumpkin', or 'backwater country-come-to-town ignoramus'.

Using that definition, I know many Christians whom are also pagans. Big Grin

/etymological geekdom

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09-11-2015, 10:04 AM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
(09-11-2015 08:22 AM)yakherder Wrote:  ... But finding a way to allow people to maintain some of their traditions while modifying the context in which those traditions were practiced allowed for the subversion or assimilation of countless cultures without having to simply kill them all.

And, historically speaking, this sort of syncretism was omnipresent without even being deliberate. Christmas is one of the few cases where the re-interpretation of some aspects was official - but even that was in large part codifying standard practice as it had already begun to develop.

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09-11-2015, 05:24 PM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
(09-11-2015 08:44 AM)Old Man Marsh Wrote:  Slightly off-topic here, but I don't like to use the word pagan to describe pre-Christian religious beliefs.

What would you call them, indigenous religions?

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09-11-2015, 05:48 PM
Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
So would u say Christmas is strictly a religious holiday nowadays since culture changed it? Or is Christmas a "pagan" holiday that many Christians use to celebrate their faith?

"If you cannot explain it simply, you don't understand it enough" -Albert Einstein
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09-11-2015, 06:16 PM
RE: Why was pagan holiday renamed Xmas
(09-11-2015 05:24 PM)cactus Wrote:  
(09-11-2015 08:44 AM)Old Man Marsh Wrote:  Slightly off-topic here, but I don't like to use the word pagan to describe pre-Christian religious beliefs.

What would you call them, indigenous religions?

I'd call it by whatever god was predominantly worshipped. Roman smithies probably made most of their offerings at the temple of Vulcan, so I would call that Vulcanism. Wine makers would probably be found at the temple of Bacchus, so I would call that Bacchuanity. Farmers would probably give equal time to the sun god, rain god, and dirt god (damn trinitys).

...you know what? It's probably more convenient to just call them pagans.

Don't let those gnomes and their illusions get you down. They're just gnomes and illusions.

--Jake the Dog, Adventure Time

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