Word of the Day
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13-12-2015, 03:58 PM
RE: Word of the Day
(13-12-2015 03:43 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  ver·i·si·mil·i·tude
ˌverəsəˈmiliˌt(y)o͞od/Submit
noun
the appearance of being true or real.

As a word, it does have a strong contextual vibe to the conversation around here....but I just think it's a really fun word to say. It rolls off the tongue nicely.

Verisimilitude...yeah....Smile
Also used in fiction, too. The condition of being true in a different "world." Sometimes the cause of fan arguments. Smile
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22-12-2015, 10:25 AM
RE: Word of the Day
cavil \KAV-il\

verb:
to raise trivial and frivolous objection

Examples

Amber caviled about going to the flea market when I first brought up the idea, but she seemed to enjoy herself thoroughly once we were there.

"The system prompted some critics to cavil that the Volt was not an electric car, and was simply a plug-in hybrid…." — Frank A. Aukofer, The Providence Journal, 11 Oct. 2015

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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22-12-2015, 12:32 PM
RE: Word of the Day
Vagina /vuh-jai-nah/ (n)

1. The box a penis comes in.
2. The best friend a penis will ever have.
3. The reason the world turns.

Source: Urban Dictionary

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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24-12-2015, 09:06 AM
RE: Word of the Day
aftermath \AF-ter-math\

noun

1 : a second-growth crop

2 : consequence, result

3 : the period immediately following a usually ruinous event

Examples

It was almost noon before I felt ready to face the aftermath of the previous night's festivities, and to begin cleaning up.

“In the aftermath of World War II, Tupperware parties became a popular compromise between the jobs many [American women] had grown accustomed to while American men were fighting overseas and their re-entrenched domestic obligations as wives and mothers." — Schuyler Velasco, The Christian Science Monitor, 31 Aug. 2015

I screwed up the math part of my SAT’s so badly that I fear the aftermath will include not getting into any college. Weeping

The aftermath of this, my 7,000th post, will be but an unnoticed ripple in the waters of the TTA forum. Smartass

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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26-12-2015, 07:24 PM
RE: Word of the Day
o·mer·tà ōˈmertə/

noun
(as practiced by the Mafia) a code of silence about criminal activity and a refusal to give evidence to authorities.

Conspiracy of silence.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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27-12-2015, 10:59 AM
RE: Word of the Day
(26-12-2015 07:24 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  o·mer·tà ōˈmertə/

noun
(as practiced by the Mafia) a code of silence about criminal activity and a refusal to give evidence to authorities.

Conspiracy of silence.

Good one. One of the few cover songs we used to play. Always a fun one to do.




But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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27-12-2015, 12:24 PM
RE: Word of the Day
This one could the title of a forum category



clishmaclaver

\klish-muh-KLEY-ver, kleesh-\
noun
1. gossip; idle or foolish talk.

Quotes
I have heard Thatcher's voice on the evening news suddenly cut through the clishmaclaver of an Edinburgh pub, abruptly stilling the conversation, and causing a dark flush to spread collectively up the necks of its grim listeners.
-- Alastair Reid, "The Scottish Condition," The Wilson Quarterly, Volume 18, 1994

Origin
Clishmaclaver is a combination of the terms clish-clash and claver, both of which mean "gossip." It entered English in the early 1700s.
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27-12-2015, 02:07 PM
RE: Word of the Day
(27-12-2015 12:24 PM)Grassy Knoll Wrote:  This one could the title of a forum category



clishmaclaver

\klish-muh-KLEY-ver, kleesh-\
noun
1. gossip; idle or foolish talk.

Quotes
I have heard Thatcher's voice on the evening news suddenly cut through the clishmaclaver of an Edinburgh pub, abruptly stilling the conversation, and causing a dark flush to spread collectively up the necks of its grim listeners.
-- Alastair Reid, "The Scottish Condition," The Wilson Quarterly, Volume 18, 1994

Origin
Clishmaclaver is a combination of the terms clish-clash and claver, both of which mean "gossip." It entered English in the early 1700s.

That has to be an English term, I can say this is the first time I’ve heard it. Good one Thumbsup

In the example above I would have used the word “din” in its place.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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27-12-2015, 02:21 PM
RE: Word of the Day
solecism \SAH-luh-sih-zum\

noun

1 : an ungrammatical combination of words in a sentence; also : a minor blunder in speech

2 : something deviating from the proper, normal, or accepted order

3 : a breach of etiquette or decorum

EXAMPLES

As a copyeditor, Jane has the eyes of a hawk; rarely, if ever, does she let a writer's solecism slip past her.

"What [Leonard Lyons] presented in his columns was the essence of the person being reported on, and so even when one comes upon the occasional solecism or inaccuracy, it matters less because the portraits as a whole ring true." — Martin Rubin, The Washington Times, September 5, 2011

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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28-12-2015, 08:54 AM (This post was last modified: 28-12-2015 08:57 AM by Full Circle.)
RE: Word of the Day
Pyrrhic victory

Pyr·rhic \ˈpir-ik\

adjective

: achieved at excessive cost <a Pyrrhic victory>; also : costly to the point of negating or outweighing expected benefits

A Pyrrhic victory is a victory that inflicts such a devastating toll on the victor that it is tantamount to defeat. Someone who wins a Pyrrhic victory has been victorious in some way. However, the heavy toll negates any sense of achievement or profit.

The phrase Pyrrhic victory is named after king Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered irreplaceable casualties in defeating the Romans at Heraclea in 280 BC and Asculum in 279 BC during the Pyrrhic War. After the latter battle, Plutarch relates in a report by Dionysius:

The armies separated; and, it is said, Pyrrhus replied to one that gave him joy of his victory that one other such victory would utterly undo him. For he had lost a great part of the forces he brought with him, and almost all his particular friends and principal commanders; there were no others there to make recruits, and he found the confederates in Italy backward. On the other hand, as from a fountain continually flowing out of the city, the Roman camp was quickly and plentifully filled up with fresh men, not at all abating in courage for the loss they sustained, but even from their very anger gaining new force and resolution to go on with the war.

— Plutarch, Life of Pyrrhus

The report is often quoted as “Another such victory and I come back to Epirus alone”.

Personal note: I sometimes think that for a few of us coming out as atheists to our families resembles a Pyrrhic victory. On the one hand we stay true to who we are and drop the subterfuge of appearing to believe, on the other the family becomes estranged and you lose your emotional support. Your personal victory comes at a great cost.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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