Word of the Day
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04-01-2016, 10:04 PM
RE: Word of the Day
(30-12-2015 09:04 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  “The Pretence of Knowledge”

When mathematical equations and results are spit out by econometric models to imbue economics with a patina of scientific respectability.

Coined by Friedrich von Hayek, in his 1974 Nobel Prize lecture.

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/e...cture.html

"This brings me to the crucial issue. Unlike the position that exists in the physical sciences, in economics and other disciplines that deal with essentially complex phenomena, the aspects of the events to be accounted for about which we can get quantitative data are necessarily limited and may not include the important ones. While in the physical sciences it is generally assumed, probably with good reason, that any important factor which determines the observed events will itself be directly observable and measurable, in the study of such complex phenomena as the market, which depend on the actions of many individuals, all the circumstances which will determine the outcome of a process, for reasons which I shall explain later, will hardly ever be fully known or measurable. And while in the physical sciences the investigator will be able to measure what, on the basis of a prima facie theory, he thinks important, in the social sciences often that is treated as important which happens to be accessible to measurement. This is sometimes carried to the point where it is demanded that our theories must be formulated in such terms that they refer only to measurable magnitudes.”

I have noticed that this “Pretence of Knowledge” can also be applied to our current Conspiracy Theorist. If you throw enough numbers around it does give a patina of respectability and even gravitas, however when looked at closely they are but meaningless drivel cloaked in pseudo-physics.

If you took all the economists in the world and lined them all up end to end, they would still point in different directions.
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18-04-2016, 07:39 AM
RE: Word of the Day
A test on the meaning of words.

My score 26/30

http://people.howstuffworks.com/words-we...hswaccount

Good luck.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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18-04-2016, 08:37 AM (This post was last modified: 18-04-2016 09:06 AM by SYZ.)
RE: Word of the Day
(18-04-2016 07:39 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  A test on the meaning of words.
My score 26/30
Good luck.

Me 27/30.

There are a couple of funny ones in the mix. Irregardless is commonly used in Australia, and has been in included in dictionaries since c1915.

Weary can mean mentally exhausted or irksome—which could be as a result of putting up with your neighbour's aggressive dog.

Although some have claimed a semantic distinction between the words toward and towards, the difference is merely dialectal. Toward is more common in US English and towards is more common in British (Australian) English.

—It'd be interesting to see if these 3 words are responsible for most errors.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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18-04-2016, 09:50 AM
RE: Word of the Day
(18-04-2016 08:37 AM)SYZ Wrote:  ...
Toward is more common in US English and towards is more common in British (Australian) English.

—It'd be interesting to see if these 3 words are responsible for most errors.

Even though I read this, I still chose "towards" on principal principle.

29/30

Smartass

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18-04-2016, 10:02 AM
RE: Word of the Day
(18-04-2016 07:39 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  A test on the meaning of words.

My score 26/30

http://people.howstuffworks.com/words-we...hswaccount

Good luck.
Also 26/30. Not bad for a foreigner Wink

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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18-04-2016, 03:19 PM
RE: Word of the Day
30/30.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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18-04-2016, 06:49 PM
RE: Word of the Day
26/30.

One was a dumb mistake, I just didn't read thoroughly enough.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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18-04-2016, 06:57 PM
RE: Word of the Day
(18-04-2016 03:19 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  30/30.

Sez you... Big Grin

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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04-09-2016, 06:36 AM
RE: Word of the Day
asperse

verb | uh-SPURSS

Definition

1 : sprinkle; especially : to sprinkle with holy water

2 : to attack with evil reports or false or injurious charges

“To cast aspersions” is something I have heard of before, now it makes more sense to me.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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15-01-2017, 06:36 PM
RE: Word of the Day
kakistocracy

noun kak·is·toc·ra·cy \ˌkakə̇ˈstäkrəsē\

plural kakistocracies

: government by the worst people

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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