World wide war on drugs.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
23-12-2011, 10:34 AM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
(23-12-2011 04:05 AM)Filox Wrote:  Leela, yes you are correct, but look at the alcohol, in the 20's in USA during the prohibition there were huge mafia families who earned millions and millions of dollars just because the alcohol for prohibited. Today when it is legal, who deals in illegal alcohol and why would they? Only maybe somebody on the countryside who makes their own domestic brandy, but you can not call that the black market. That is just some small quantity for personal use, and maybe to sell a few bottles without reporting it for taxes. So you see, the whole mafia was robed from the profit when the state has decided to make alcohol legal again, they had to find other means of earning money.

And it is always good to have some competition, so we will have government issued weed and street weed, more choice, better standards, better prices, classical business economy.

This is why I'm perplexed why more students of history in the US wouldn't be behind legalization of weed, and possibly harder drugs. The US Prohibition years are a perfect example of the criminal element making enterprise in an area of illegal product. Where did the mobsters turn after alcohol was made legal again? Into other illegal activities: gambling, drugs, prostitution. Make these things legal and they'll have to find something else to do. And they will. But that still doesn't mean those things should continue to be illegal "just because."

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Erxomai's post
24-12-2011, 07:00 PM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
Subtle things most folks don't know about in the poorer side of NYC. The arrest rate for cannabis in low income African American and Hispanic areas in New York is too damn high. They haven't uploaded the full video yet, but I saw it recently on Current TV.





____________________________________________________________________

[Image: graph2.11.jpg]

Now I agree that low income areas can have serious criminal problems, but that increase is kind of nutters.

____________________________________________________________________

This one is quite a doozy. It's about prescription drug abuse, more specifically Oxycodone.






Look. The War on drugs is nothing more than a war on freedom. Here in Brooklyn, people see it as a war on the poor, as they take the brunt of the arrests. It leads to corruption on the side that is supposed to stand up for the citizens; the police. It's kind of ridiculous how often people get searched in lower income areas, I've seen it, and I've been through it once myself back in high school. I had my pockets dug out and my jacket searched, all while being watched by passers by in the streets. It made me feel like a criminal; like I had done something wrong to somebody, somewhere. It hurt, to the point where I had trouble even being near a police officer; I labeled them all as possible embarrassment factories. I usually don't carry anything on my person, because I figured at the time with how touchy feely they get, they might try to fine me for a bit of cannabis. I was smart with understanding the extent of a fine, but ignorant to what the real problem was.

Other kids I'm sure haven't been so lucky. Jail is not a pretty place. Not a place to grow up, and not a place to be when you have a child. Here in NY, too many non violent drug users who are part of the minority are being arrested, or stopped and frisked in the middle of the street. It instills a stigma among those watching that these men and women of varying age ALL did something wrong. and most of the time, it's a black or Hispanic person.

Interactive charton NYC arrests and frisks.

Here's a news article from Gabriel Sayegh of the Huffington Post:

Quote:New York City remains the marijuana arrest capital of the world, according to an upcoming report by Queens College Professor Harry Levine. In 1993, there were only 900 arrests for possession of small amounts of marijuana, while 40,000 people were arrested in 2008--mostly young Black and Latino men. Dr. Levine calls this a "marijuana arrest crusade." What's going on here?

Dr. Levine's new research builds on a report he co-authored last year, and shows that beginning in the early 1990s, under then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani, the New York City Police Department dramatically increased arrests for possession of marijuana. Those arrests have continued--and in fact increased--under Mayor Michael Bloomberg, even though New York decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana decades ago.

The Rockefeller Drug Laws, enacted in 1973, initially included long, mandatory prison terms for drug offenses, including possessing small amounts of marijuana. But in 1977, at the behest of district attorneys and parent teacher organizations, the Legislature took the right step and removed marijuana from the Rockefeller Drug Laws. Why? Because many young white kids were being arrested for pot, and neither parents nor the DAs wanted them saddled with criminal records for an otherwise benign offense. New York thus became one of thirteen states to decriminalize personal possession of marijuana.

Thus personal possession of 25 grams or less is now legally akin to jaywalking or riding your bicycle on the sidewalk--an infraction, not a criminal offense.

Possessing or using "marijuana in public view" remains a misdemeanor offense.

According to Dr. Levine, the vast majority of those arrested aren't smoking in public at all. Instead, the marijuana is uncovered as part of the NYPD's massive stop-and-frisk program, which overwhelmingly targets Black and Latino men. What happens, according to Dr Levine and the hundreds of arrestees and defense attorneys he has interviewed, is that the police tell someone to empty their pockets, and once that person pulls out a small amount of marijuana, they are thus charged with "marijuana in public view."

In this way, the NYPD has arrested tens of thousands of New Yorkers every year for possessing small amounts of marijuana. These arrests are expensive, costing nearly $90 million a year. And there are other costs: an arrest record can result in severe collateral consequences, like loss of employment, or the chance at a college scholarship. Spending the night in one of the City's overcrowded holding pens or in Riker's can itself be traumatic.

The most alarming component of these arrests, however, are the racial disparities. Nearly 90% of all those arrested for possession of marijuana are Black and Latino. Whites comprise 35% of the City population, but make up less than 10% of all those arrested for possession of marijuana. These disparities are not indicators of who uses marijuana--over 1/3 of all adults U.S. have tried marijuana, and anyone on a casual weekend stroll through the Upper West Side or Prospect Park will find a number of white people puffing away.

With the City primary elections just weeks away, one wonders where candidates for public office stand on this issue. Are mass arrests of young Black and Latino men for something the Legislature decriminalized in 1977 a prudent use of taxpayer dollars? If the arrests are thought to serve broader public safety goals, what are they? Are the arrests achieving them? Are massive racial disparities acceptable in service of such goals? Acceptable to whom? The candidates should be asked - and answer - these important questions.

Like President Obama, Mayor Bloomberg has admitted to smoking marijuana-- and even told reporters in his 2001 campaign that he "liked it." He's not alone--hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers regularly smoke marijuana, and millions more have tried it. So after decriminalization, why is New York City the marijuana capital of the world? Dr. Levine's research tries to answer that question, but it's our elected officials who should provide us with answers.


The thing that bothers me the most is that the WoD isn't just a "little" thing. Non-violent offenders are topping prison rates at high rates, and the number grows.


Just a bit of research:

Number of sentenced prisoners in federal prison by most serious offense in 2010

Violent crime: 14,830 (7.8%)

Property: 11,264 (5.9%)

Drugs: 97,472 (51.1%)

Public Order: 65,873 (34.6%)

Other/Unspecified: 1,203 (.6%)

- Violent = homicide, robbery, murder, and manslaughter (negligent and non-negligent).

- Property = burglary, fraud, etc.

- Public Order = immigration, weapons, etc.

Source: Guerino, Paul; Harrison, Paige M.; and Sabol, William J., "Prisoners in 2010," Bureau of Justice Statistics, (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, December 2011), NCJ 236096, p. 30. http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/p10.pdf === West, Heather C.; Sabol, William J.; and Greenman, Sarah J., "Prisoners in 2009," Bureau of Justice Statistics, (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, December 2010), NCJ 231675, Appendix Table 18, p. 33. http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/p09.pdf === Beck, Allen J. and Harrison, Paige M., "Prisoners in 2000," Bureau of Justice Statistics, (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, December 2011), NCJ 188207 http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p00.pdf



"Department of corrections data show that about a fourth of those initially imprisoned for nonviolent crimes are sentenced for a second time for committing a violent offense. Whatever else it reflects, this pattern highlights the possibility that prison serves to transmit violent habits and values rather than to reduce them."

Source: Craig Haney, Ph.D., and Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D., "The Past and Future of U.S. Prison Policy: Twenty-five Years After the Stanford Prison Experiment," American Psychologist, Vol. 53, No. 7 (July 1998), p. 721.
http://www.csdp.org/research/haney_apa.pdf



The only thing the War on Drugs does is pump out criminals. Be they the gang members, the drug cartel capos, or the non violent teens, men, and women who had to deal with the trials and tribulations of jail time which either broke them, or shaped them into more violent people.

"You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.” -Siddhārtha Gautama
"I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.” -Lao Tzu
"...thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself..." -Jesus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thinking about Myths's post
24-12-2011, 07:25 PM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
The only thing the War on Drugs does is pump out criminals. Be they the gang members, the drug cartel capos, or the non violent teens, men, and women who had to deal with the trials and tribulations of jail time which either broke them, or shaped them into more violent people.
[/quote]

That's about right.
WTF is up with NY anyway? Why are they SO anti pot?
I don't understand the motivation or what entity is driving such nonsense.
With numbers this far askew something is obviously seriously wrong.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes TalladegaTom's post
24-12-2011, 07:53 PM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
(24-12-2011 07:25 PM)TalladegaTom Wrote:  The only thing the War on Drugs does is pump out criminals. Be they the gang members, the drug cartel capos, or the non violent teens, men, and women who had to deal with the trials and tribulations of jail time which either broke them, or shaped them into more violent people.

Quote:That's about right.
WTF is up with NY anyway? Why are they SO anti pot?
I don't understand the motivation or what entity is driving such nonsense.
With numbers this far askew something is obviously seriously wrong.

ME! ME! I know that!

In US, the penitentiary system is controlled and administered by private business. This is a major cash cow and, to keep it running smoothly, the owners don't eat alone, but rather offer free shares, campaign money and various other incentives to key-politicians. In exchange, they "only" require a few things, including but not limited to maintaining the current legal status of drugs and immigration laws as a way to maintain a steady and increasing source of "clients". I hope this answers your question.

Oh, no Hallucinations 4:11 says the 'gilded sheep should be stewed in rat blood' but Morons 5:16 contradicts it. (Chas)

I would never shake a baby unless the recipe requires it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Malleus's post
24-12-2011, 08:02 PM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
(24-12-2011 07:25 PM)TalladegaTom Wrote:  That's about right.
WTF is up with NY anyway? Why are they SO anti pot?
I don't understand the motivation or what entity is driving such nonsense.
With numbers this far askew something is obviously seriously wrong.

We used to have the Rockefeller Drug Laws, which dealt with drug sales and possessions in NY. Two ounces to four ounces of any drug (cannabis, cocaine, heroin, and the likes) had a minimum of 15 to life, to a maximum of 25 to life. It made the non violent crime of doing drugs on the same level as murdering someone.
They started to make changes to it in '04, then in '09 they took off the mandatory minimum sentencing, offering either rehab, or jail.
Now the police need to fill quotas, and the easiest way to do it is to frisk somebody for something, anything, that can incriminate them.They have been doing it for years, and the arrests they made separated young boys and girls from their fathers and mothers, and denying thousands of teens the right to financial aid for college.





The precincts call it "productivity goals", but really, it's just pushing the police to write summons and make arrests, which loop back into the DEA's records of arrests for drug crimes. Also, for younger kids, they are given an option to either go to jail (yeah, right) or go to rehab. The obvious choice is made, and the DEA can also show that there is a high number of young adults in rehab. Cannabis is near the bottom, and it stays in the body much, much longer than any other drug, which also "benefits" the DEA.

[Image: Alcohol-Drug-Testing-Detection1.jpg]

"You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.” -Siddhārtha Gautama
"I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.” -Lao Tzu
"...thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself..." -Jesus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thinking about Myths's post
27-12-2011, 02:50 AM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
Damn, and I thought that our cops are assholes that frisk you for no reason, then look, on the other side of the planet, in the best country in the world, same thing. Did you see what Rockefeller and Dupont did to us? God damn rich bastards.

That is why you should never carry weed in you pocket, stop wearing boxer shorts, use normal, old school underwear and hide your weed with your Precious. Not 100% safe, but that is the last thing they search when frisking you. Smile

[Image: a6505fe8.jpg]
I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours.
-Hunter S. Thompson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
27-12-2011, 07:47 AM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
(27-12-2011 02:50 AM)Filox Wrote:  Damn, and I thought that our cops are assholes that frisk you for no reason, then look, on the other side of the planet, in the best country in the world, same thing. Did you see what Rockefeller and Dupont did to us? God damn rich bastards.

That is why you should never carry weed in you pocket, stop wearing boxer shorts, use normal, old school underwear and hide your weed with your Precious. Not 100% safe, but that is the last thing they search when frisking you. Smile

What's the low down on your part of the planet Filox? Any info to show how useless the War is? Any Experiences?

"You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.” -Siddhārtha Gautama
"I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.” -Lao Tzu
"...thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself..." -Jesus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
27-12-2011, 12:29 PM (This post was last modified: 27-12-2011 12:36 PM by TalladegaTom.)
RE: World wide war on drugs.
ME! ME! I know that!

In US, the penitentiary system is controlled and administered by private business. This is a major cash cow and, to keep it running smoothly, the owners don't eat alone, but rather offer free shares, campaign money and various other incentives to key-politicians. In exchange, they "only" require a few things, including but not limited to maintaining the current legal status of drugs and immigration laws as a way to maintain a steady and increasing source of "clients". I hope this answers your question.
[/quote]

It did. Sadly.
At what point do We The People decide to not tolerate this any longer. Angry
Every single person charged with BS crime in NYC should demand a trial by jury.
Overload the system with their own BS. Occupy it.
Vote progressives in and the bums out. I know I know, easier said than done.
(reaches for pie seen in sky....)
Thank you. Interesting stuff.
It is so blithering obvious to anyone that the War On Drugs is an utter failure except to those who have the power to change it.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-12-2011, 03:06 AM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
@ Thinking about Myths:

Sure I have experiences, that is the only thing I have... Smile I already wrote in detail about this, now I'm searching for the post so I can put the link here. In the meanwhile, I have found some other link, connected to this subject, so here they all are:

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thre...nd-cancer?

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thread-Drugs?

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thread-Smoking

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thre...bad-habits

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thre...or-you-bro

And here is the one that you might be interested in, here are my stories and experience.

http://thethinkingatheist.com/forum/Thre...ose-calls?
P.S.
Damn, it's easier to write it all down again, than look through this forum... We should have one whole part just for this kind of topics.

Smile

[Image: a6505fe8.jpg]
I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours.
-Hunter S. Thompson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Filox's post
30-12-2011, 09:01 AM
RE: World wide war on drugs.
I read your experience with police, and I have to say, Filox, that getting your own private spot has to best idea I've ever heard! Smile

"You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger.” -Siddhārtha Gautama
"I have just three things to teach: simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.” -Lao Tzu
"...thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself..." -Jesus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: