Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
31-05-2014, 08:01 PM
RE: Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
(31-05-2014 07:55 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  The nigh-uncontrollable habit of correcting or adjusting people has earned me few friends, I can tell you.


Personally I would love more friends like you FT. I want to believe and express as few false things as I can and I'm willing to look a bit stupid from time to time to get there.
It's a habit I personally value. *hat tip*
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like WhiskeyDebates's post
31-05-2014, 08:52 PM
RE: Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
Nope. Religion is like the European Puncture Vine on my property. Impossible to get rid of so you just better learn to live with it.

Do not lose your knowledge that man's proper estate is an upright posture, an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads. - Ayn Rand.

Don't sacrifice for me, live for yourself! - Me

The only alternative to Objectivism is some form of Subjectivism. - Dawson Bethrick
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-05-2014, 08:59 PM
RE: Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
I don't think abiogenesis would kill religion (because reasons, namely people), but it would drastically widen the divide between religion and science to the point that they would indeed be mutually exclusive. Those of faith would not be able to cling to the "oh we believe in science too" bit, unless and until they were to restructure the official foundations of their faiths to better conform to science. Until that was to happen, anyone who converted to a faith would do so conscious of the fact that they were putting aside science in the same act. Likewise, those within the faiths who decided they believed science would be more conscious that this would be in direct opposition to what they had been taught.

There would be much less room for semantic pattycake where science vs religion is concerned.

A person very dear to me was badly hurt through a misunderstanding and miscommunication. For this, I am sorry, and he knows it. That said, any blaming me for malicious intent is for the birds. I will not wear some scarlet letter, I will not be anybody's whipping girl, and I will not lurk in silence.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Charis's post
31-05-2014, 09:44 PM
RE: Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
(31-05-2014 08:59 PM)Charis Wrote:  I don't think abiogenesis would kill religion (because reasons, namely people), but it would drastically widen the divide between religion and science to the point that they would indeed be mutually exclusive. Those of faith would not be able to cling to the "oh we believe in science too" bit, unless and until they were to restructure the official foundations of their faiths to better conform to science. Until that was to happen, anyone who converted to a faith would do so conscious of the fact that they were putting aside science in the same act. Likewise, those within the faiths who decided they believed science would be more conscious that this would be in direct opposition to what they had been taught.

There would be much less room for semantic pattycake where science vs religion is concerned.

I dont know Consider. I can already see conspiracy theories surrounding the finding of abiogenesis lasting for decades.

“The reason people use a crucifix against vampires is because vampires are allergic to bullshit.” ― Richard Pryor
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes djkamilo's post
01-06-2014, 12:04 PM
RE: Would Abiogenesis kill religion?
(31-05-2014 09:44 PM)djkamilo Wrote:  
(31-05-2014 08:59 PM)Charis Wrote:  I don't think abiogenesis would kill religion (because reasons, namely people), but it would drastically widen the divide between religion and science to the point that they would indeed be mutually exclusive. Those of faith would not be able to cling to the "oh we believe in science too" bit, unless and until they were to restructure the official foundations of their faiths to better conform to science. Until that was to happen, anyone who converted to a faith would do so conscious of the fact that they were putting aside science in the same act. Likewise, those within the faiths who decided they believed science would be more conscious that this would be in direct opposition to what they had been taught.

There would be much less room for semantic pattycake where science vs religion is concerned.

I dont know Consider. I can already see conspiracy theories surrounding the finding of abiogenesis lasting for decades.

...or centuries...

Just because YOU believe in fairies doesn't mean anybody else should.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Bible Belt Brawler's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: