Would social manners fall under the umbrella of morals and/or ethics?
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16-05-2012, 02:19 PM
RE: Would social manners fall under the umbrella of morals and/or ethics?
This is starting to feel like a joke is being played on me. I'm waiting for a celeb to jump out of my closet with cameras and say that I've been e-punked.

The Paradox Of Fools And Wise Men:
“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser men so full of doubts.” ― Bertrand Russell
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16-05-2012, 03:04 PM
RE: Would social manners fall under the umbrella of morals and/or ethics?
(16-05-2012 02:18 PM)TrulyX Wrote:  We don't agree. I can't see what connections you think science is going to be able to come up with. What I was explaining might be possible, would be on par with them proving that god(s) exist (that might be an overstatement but not much of one).
You have got to be shitting me. You literally just posted a few minutes ago that you think there are connections that can be made between manners and ethics. Now you're comparing the likelihood of those connections, that you yourself think exist, being substantiated via scientific inquiry on par with substantiating that god exists?

FYI - It's worth pointing out that the scientific method doesn't "prove" anything. That's not the aim of scientific inquiry. In fact, the scientific method demands that there never be 100% certainty. That's what makes it so ingeniously self-correcting.

Also, if you're looking for my opinion on where the scientific link can be made, I'll reiterate my previous mention regarding studies on the positive societal impact that grooming has in primate societies. Grooming, in my opinion, is a form of "manners" and individuals and groups that perform this behavior properly seem to prosper whereas individuals that don't seem to not prosper. At least that's what the studies I've seen and heard seem to suggest.

Again, this is little more than conjecture and opinion, because I am not a tenured scientific researcher with any field experience or anything like that.

But since you seem dead set on continuing, I figured I'd offer something up. Fuck it. Let's keep the party going.

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16-05-2012, 03:55 PM
RE: Would social manners fall under the umbrella of morals and/or ethics?
Quote:You literally just posted a few minutes ago that you think there are connections that can be made between manners and ethics.
'Connections' is a very broad term. The connections I was referring to, were not the same as the connection that you are claiming.

I was referring to very small connections that can be made between parts of ethics/morality and certain manners, but none of those, in any way, connect the two ideas overall or allow manners to "fall under the umbrella". As I pointed out, I believe that, even though you could do it, it's absurd to make that such a connection. The manners and ethics are separate and distinct and should remain separate and distinct.

What I was referring to, some things I have already mentioned, were connections such as: statements of affirmation of moral goodness as manners (e.g. saying please, thank you, you're welcome, etc), some things that fall under manners also might be considered under morality (i.e. some immoral acts might be considered as rude also-- but it's not immoral because it shows poor manners nor does it have to be considered poor manners because its immoral), etc.

Manners overall, though, are arbitrarily defined and have pretty much always been viewed as such (pretty much by definition). It's clear that what you wear to a formal event, how you eat, what fork you use, how you speak, etc. are clearly arbitrated and not at all based in fact, not even a bit. While ethics/morality, on the other hand, have usually been viewed as absolute. You can obviously say that morals are also preferences as I pointed out, but that takes away objective truth and makes morality useless to you at that point; also that is kind of beside the point.

Quote: Also, if you're looking for my opinion on where the scientific link can
be made, I'll reiterate my previous mention regarding studies on the
positive societal impact that grooming has in primate societies.
Grooming, in my opinion, is a form of "manners" and individuals and
groups that perform this behavior properly seem to prosper whereas
individuals that don't seem to not prosper. At least that's what the
studies I've seen and heard seem to suggest.
That's all I wanted, thanks; now I can just respectfully disagree, and I know exactly what I'm disagreeing to. I've already gave the arguments to why I feel that way, so there is no need to ask for explanation.

The Paradox Of Fools And Wise Men:
“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser men so full of doubts.” ― Bertrand Russell
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