Wrenching
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30-12-2015, 05:50 PM
RE: Wrenching
if that fits the topic, I just completed a whole house remodel I started last December. I built my own kitchen cabinets, murphy bed, closets, moved some walls.
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30-12-2015, 06:49 PM
RE: Wrenching
Hats off to skyking....


I've got some walnut logs (18 inch diameter, 8-10 ft long) that I just picked up - that I'm going to take to the local saw mill to have cut into 4x6 - then put up for seasoning....

I plan on using it to build my own kitchen cabinets.

There's nothing like building it yourself - to know it's done right...

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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30-12-2015, 07:56 PM
RE: Wrenching
I have the Ultimate Tool Kit. I refer to him as "my husband."

We have enough youth. How about looking for the Fountain of Smart?
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30-12-2015, 09:31 PM
RE: Wrenching
I’ve got a decent wood shop. Table saw, radial saw, shaper, 6” jointer, 15” planer, mortiser and a drill press. Some nice hand tools too. Planes, chisels and clamps. Lots of clamps. About twenty years ago this tornado took out about 40 acres of 100 year old timber on a friend’s family farm, and we salvaged a lot of cherry and walnut. I’ve still probably got 5 or 6 hundred board feet of 5/4 left.

I’m less experienced on the automotive side, but I’m comfortable enough with what I’m doing to replace the cams, cam plate, oil pump and lifters in the softail’s 103 myself. That took a couple of specialized tools, but they weren't that expensive. I was a little disappointed, but not surprised when the crank runout exceeded 0.003" which meant no gear drives for the cams.

Save a life. Adopt a greyhound.

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31-12-2015, 12:50 AM (This post was last modified: 31-12-2015 08:11 AM by skyking.)
RE: Wrenching
Nice fellas! I do have the wood fever.
Popeye, I get the clamp thing. Here is my corner cab. I used no nails to set the face frame, only some pocket screws to set the center piece and then lots and lots of clamps and glue.
[Image: cornercab3_zpscopikvq3.jpg]

Here it is in context.
[Image: fridge1_zpsrhv3fswc.jpg]

Which then connects around to a wall of pantry.

[Image: pantry002_zps6up5fbfx.jpg]

Check out the crazy grain on that side board of the corner cab. it is as smooth as can be but looks all quilty.
[Image: pantry001_zpsyistzdbu.jpg]

I did not make the doors. I have a local shop that churns out a nice door, and sells me the hardware and the face frame wood from the same lot for cheaper than I can get it anywhere. It is already S2S straightlined. I figure I was busy enough designing and building the cabs and moving walls, etc.

I kept the footprint of the main peninsula, and it had a total waste of space at the end of it. I made up some bones using leftover mahogany ply and some ash,

[Image: round3_zpsvcgbgcu5.jpg]
and covered it with meranti bending plywood, then curly maple veneer. The fake rails I made with white bending oak in the steam box, then more curly veneer. The stiles I kerf cut so I could get a bend out of the kiln dried maple.

[Image: kerf1_zpsumwyh0dn.jpg]

Inside I installed two 40" diameter turntables for all that big stuff that has no good home. Canners, big kettles, extra coffee makers, you name it.
It has a door on either side where it tapers in to meet the main part of the peninsula.
[Image: GR6_zpssln2masq.jpg]

[Image: GR9_zpsyvagpsxg.jpg]

On the dining side I designed some 2/3rds glass doors with a cross mullion, so my wife could display things and not worry about glass at toe level. The main cab was too deep for a single drawer from the kitchen so it worked out to give part over to the dining room.

Granite and copper sink pic.

[Image: GR8_zpsxrmbop2s.jpg]
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31-12-2015, 07:20 AM
RE: Wrenching
Very impressive.....

Quite a show of talent.....

Mine's gonna look like packing crates in comparison...

Big Grin

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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31-12-2015, 08:12 AM
RE: Wrenching
Thanks. You'd be surprised, once the wood fever strikes it becomes easier.
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31-12-2015, 07:41 PM
RE: Wrenching
Skyking, that is an impressive set of cabinets! I also do woodworking and am currently building a new chest for my wood carving tools. I picked up the carving hobby after I retired. Have you ever been to a website called "LumberJocks"? Lots of woodworking projects to look through, there.

I do most of my own repairs, on almost everything I own. I haven't rebuilt automatic transmissions (or transaxles) or AC compressors, but I've had my hands into just about every other component of a motor vehicle, at least once, and was an ASE mechanic with certs for engine repair and tuneup, brakes, alignment and AC, and was a state-licensed smog, brake and lamp technician (in California). Served in the US Navy as a steam turbine mechanic (Machinist's Mate) prior to college and the mentioned mechanic job. Also worked as a Journeyman Millwright in the early '90s after I got laid off in the aerospace biz, and before I got back into it, until I retired.

I've built houses from the ground up, digging the trenches for the foundations, building the forms (paid to have the concrete pumped- it would take days with a 3-sack mixer- had to have help raising the walls. I didn't do the stucco work, that's doable but would have taken too long, like the concrete for the foundations.

I gave up being a mechanic for a living when I graduated from the Uni and went to work as a mechanical engineer. There was a brief stint of about 5 years where I designed and built communications antennas. Also worked for the Lockheed Skunk Works on the F117A and F22, doing radar cross section and communications system testing.

I do a little coppersmithing, too. I'm fixing up my M-I-L's house to rent out, so haven't done any copper work recently, what with all the other stuff going on.
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