You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
22-06-2013, 10:34 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
Aside from the OP being an obvious, and in fact very unskilled, amatuer and highly unprofessional troll, I will point out that the claim that women are less involved in Science, and have contributed to Science, and therefore society and the world, less than men is an unfounded assertion.

Just look at this list from Wikipedia of female scientists in the 20th Century:

Wikipedia Wrote:Anthropology[edit]
Ruth Benedict (1887–1948), American anthropologist
Margaret Mead (1901-1978), American anthropologist
Camilla Wedgwood (1901-1955), British/Australian anthropologist
Archeology[edit]
Zsófia Torma (1832–1899), Hungarian archeologist, paleologist, anthropologist
Astronomy[edit]
Claudia Alexander, American planetary scientist
Mary Adela Blagg (1858–1944), British astronomer
Margaret Burbidge (1919–), British astrophysicist
Jocelyn Bell Burnell (1943–), British astrophysicist (discovery of radio pulsars)
Annie Jump Cannon (1863–1941), American astronomer
Janine Connes, French astronomer[5]
Heather Couper (1949–), British astronomer (astronomy popularisation, science education)
Sandra Faber (1944–), American Astronomer[6]
Pamela Gay, American astronomer
Martha Haynes, American astronomer
Lisa Kaltenegger - Austrian/American astronomer
Dorothea Klumpke (1861–1942), American-born astronomer
Henrietta Leavitt, (1868–1921), American astronomer (periodicity of variable stars)
Carolyn Porco (1953–), American planetary scientist
Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin (1900–1978), British-American astronomer
Vera Rubin (1928–), American astronomer[7]
Charlotte Moore Sitterly (1898–1990), American astronomer
Jill Tarter (1944–), American astronomer
Beatrice Tinsley (1941–1981), New Zealand astronomer and cosmologist
Beth Willman, American astronomer
Maria Zuber, American planetary scientist
Biology[edit]
June Almeida (1930–2007), British virologist
E. K. Janaki Ammal (1897–1984), Indian botanist
Caroline Austin, British molecular biologist[citation needed]
Yvonne Barr (1932–), British virologist (co-discovery of Epstein-Barr virus)
Gillian Bates, British geneticist (Huntingdon's disease)
Val Beral (1946–), British–Australian epidemiologist
Alice Middleton Boring (1883–1955), American biologist
Linda B. Buck (1947–), American neuroscientist (Nobel prize for olfactory receptors)
Martha Chase (1927–2003), American molecular biologist
Ursula M. Cowgill, American biologist and anthropologist
Suzanne Cory (1942–), Australian immunologist/cancer researcher
Gerty Theresa Cori (1896–1957), American biochemist (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1947)
Janet Darbyshire, British epidemiologist
Dian Fossey (1932–1985), American zoologist [3]
Birutė Galdikas (1946–), German primatologist and conservationist
Jane Goodall (1934–), British biologist, primatologist
Susan Greenfield (1951–), British neurophysiologist (neurophysiology of the brain, popularisation of science)
Asha Kolte, Indian biologist (1941–)[citation needed]
Marian Koshland (1921–1997), American immunologist
Misha Mahowald (1963–1996), American neuroscientist [4]
Lynn Margulis (1938–2011), American biologist
Barbara McClintock (1902–1992), American geneticist
Anne McLaren (1927–2007), British developmental biologist
Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909–), Italian neurologist (Nobel prize for growth factors)
Ann Haven Morgan (1882–1966), American zoologist
Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (1942–), German geneticist and developmental biologist (Nobel prize for homeobox genes)
Daphne Osborne (1930–2006), British plant physiologist (plant hormones)
Theodora Lisle Prankerd (1878-1939), British botanist
Joan Beauchamp Procter (1897-1931), British zoologist (herpetologist)
F. Gwendolen Rees (1906–1994), British parasitologist
Anita Roberts (1942–2006), American molecular biologist, "mother of TGF-Beta"
Margaret A. Stanley, British virologist and epithelial biologist
Phyllis Starkey (1947–) British biochemist and medical researcher
Anna Stecksén (1870-1904), Swedish pathologist
Maria Telkes (1900–1995), Hungarian-American biophysicist
Karen Vousden, British cancer researcher
Jane C. Wright (1919-2013), American oncologist
Chemistry[edit]
Alice Ball (1892-1916), American chemist
Astrid Cleve (1875–1968), Swedish chemist
Maria Skłodowska-Curie (1867–1934), Polish-French chemist (pioneer in radiology, discovery of polonium and radium)
Gertrude B. Elion (1918–1999), American biochemist (Nobel prize for drug development)
Rosalind Franklin (1920–1957), British physical chemist and crystallographer
Ellen Gleditsch (1879–1968), Norwegian radiochemist[8]
Anna J. Harrison (1912–1998), American organic chemist
Clara Immerwahr (1870–1915), German chemist
Irène Joliot-Curie (1897–1956), French chemist and nuclear physicist
Stephanie Kwolek (1923–), American chemist, inventor of Kevlar
Maud Menten (1879–1960), Canadian biochemist
Ida Noddack Tacke (1896–1978), German chemist and physicist
Patsy Sherman (20th century), American chemist, co-inventor of Scotchgard
Darshan Ranganathan (1941-2001), Indian organic chemist
Jean Thomas, British biochemist (chromatin)
Geology[edit]
Zonia Baber (1862–1955), American geographer and geologist
Ethel Shakespear (1871–1946), English geologist
Marjorie Sweeting (1920–1994), British geomorphologist
Psychology[edit]
Lera Boroditsky, American psychologist
Helen Flanders Dunbar (1902–1959) important early figure in U.S. psychosomatic medicine[9]
Margo Wilson (1945–), Canadian evolutionary psychologist
Catherine G. Wolf (1947–), American psychologist and expert in human-computer interaction
Margaret Kennard (1899-1975) did pioneering research on age effects on brain damage, which produced early evidence for neuroplasticity
Mathematician or Computer Scientist[edit]
Hertha Marks Ayrton (1854–1923), British mathematician and electrical engineer (electric arcs, sand ripples, invention of several devices, geometry)
Mary L. Cartwright (1900–1998), British mathematician[10]
Amanda Chessell computer scientist
Ingrid Daubechies, (1954–) Belgian mathematician (Wavelets - first woman to receive the National Academy of Sciences Award in Mathematics)
Tatjana Ehrenfest-Afanassjewa (1876–1964), Russian/Dutch mathematician
Evelyn Boyd Granville (1924–), American mathematician, second African-American woman to get a Ph.D. in mathematics
Grace Hopper (1906–1992), American computer scientist
Rózsa Péter (1905–1977) Hungarian mathematician
Dorothy Wrinch (1894–1976), British mathematician and theoretical biochemist
Science Education[edit]
Susan Blackmore (1951–), British science writer (memetics, evolutionary theory, consciousness, parapsychology)
Engineer[edit]
Kate Gleason (1865–1933), American engineer
Frances Hugle (1927 – 1968) American engineer
Mary Olliden Weaver (20th century), inventor
Medical Professional[edit]
Dorothy Lavinia Brown (1919–2004), American surgeon
Margaret Chan (1947–), Chinese-Canadian health administrator; director of the World Health Organization
Eleanor Davies-Colley (1874–1934), British surgeon (first female FRCS)
Louisa Martindale (1872–1966), British surgeon
Fiona Wood, (1958–), British-Australian plastic surgeon
Claire Fagin, American health-care researcher
Elsie Widdowson (1908–2000), British nutritionist
Physics[edit]
Faye Ajzenberg-Selove (1926– ), American nuclear physicist, (2007 US National Medal of Science)[11]
Betsy Ancker-Johnson (1929–), American plasma physicist
Milla Baldo-Ceolin (1924–2011), Italian particle physicist[12]
Marietta Blau (1894–1970), German experimental particle physicist
Katharine Blodgett (1898–1979), American thin-film physicist[13]
Christiane Bonnelle, French spectroscopist[14]
Margrete Heiberg Bose, Danish physicist (active in Argentina from 1909)
Jenny Rosenthal Bramley (1909–1997), Lithuanian-American physicist,[15][16]
Harriet Brooks (1876–1933), American radiation physicist
A. Catrina Bryce (1956–), Scottish laser scientist
Nina Byers (1930–), American physicist[17]
Yvette Cauchois (1908–1999), French physicist[18]
Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat (1923–), French theoretical physicist[19]
Patricia Cladis (1937–), Canadian/American physicist[20]
Esther Conwell (1922–), American physicist, semiconductors[21]
Cécile DeWitt-Morette (1922–), French mathematician and physicist[22]
Louise Dolan, American mathematical physicist, theoretical particle physics and superstring theory
Nancy M. Dowdy (1938–), Nuclear physicist, arms control[23]
Mildred Dresselhaus (1930–), American physicist, graphite, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and low dimensional thermoelectrics[24]
Helen T. Edwards (1936–), American physicist, Tevatron[25]
Magda Ericson (1929–), French nuclear physicist[26]
Ursula Franklin (1921–), Canadian metallurgist, research physicist, author and educator
Judy Franz (1938–), American physicst and educator[27]
Phyllis S. Freier (1921–1992), American astrophysicist[28]
Mary K. Gaillard (1939–), American theoretical physcist[29]
Fanny Gates (1872–1931), American physicist[30]
Claire F. Gmachl, American physicist
Maria Goeppert-Mayer (1906–1972), German-American physicist[31]
Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber (1911–1998), American nuclear physicist[32]
Sulamith Goldhaber (1923–1965), American high-energy physicist and molecular spectroscopist[33]
Gail Hanson (1947–), American high-energy physicist[34]
Margrete Heiberg Bose (1866–1952 ), Danish/Argentine physicist
Evans Hayward (1922–), American physicist[35]
Caroline Herzenberg (1932–), American physicist[36]
Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910–1994), British X-ray crystallographer
Shirley Jackson (1946–), American nuclear physicist, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, first African-American woman to earn a doctorate from M.I.T.[37]
Bertha Swirles Jeffreys (1903–1999), British physicist[38]
Lorella M. Jones (1943–1995), American particle physicist [5]
Carole Jordan (1941–), British solar physicist
Renata Kallosh (1943–), Russian/American theoretical physicist[39]
Berta Karlik (1904–1990), Austrian physicist[40]
Bruria Kaufman (1918–2010 )[41]
Elizaveta Karamihailova (1897-1968), Bulgarian nuclear physicist
Marcia Keith (1859–1950)[42]
Ann Kiessling (1942–)
Margaret Kivelson (1928–)[43]
Noemie Benczer Koller (1933–)[44]
Ninni Kronberg (1874-1946), Swedish physiologist in nutrition
Doris Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf (1922–2010)[45]
Elizabeth Laird (physicist) (1874–1969)[46]
Juliet Lee-Franzini (1933–)[47]
Inge Lehmann (1888–1993)[48]
Kathleen Lonsdale (1903–1971)[49]
Margaret Eliza Maltby (1860–1944), American physicist[50]
Helen Megaw (1907–)[51]
Lise Meitner (1878–1968), Austrian nuclear physicist (pioneering nuclear physics, discovery of nuclear fission, protactinum, and the Auger effect)
Kirstine Meyer (1861–1941)[52]
Luise Meyer-Schutzmeister (1915–1981)[53]
Anna Nagurney Canadian-born, US operations researcher/management scientist focusing on networks
Chiara Nappi, Italian American physicist
Ann Nelson (1958–), American physicist
Marcia Neugebauer,[54]
Gertrude Neumark (1927–)[55]
Ida Tacke Noddack (1896–1979)[56]
Emmy Noether (1882–1935), German mathematician and theoretical physicist (symmetries and conservation laws)
Marguerite Perey (1909–1975)[57]
Melba Phillips (1907–2004)[58]
Agnes Pockels (1862–1935)[59]
Pelageya Polubarinova-Kochina (1899–), Russian physicist[60]
Edith Quimby (1891–1982)[61]
Helen Quinn (1943–), American particle physicist[62]
Lisa Randall (1962–), American physicist
Myriam Sarachik (1933–), American physicist[63]
Bice Sechi-Zorn (1928–1984), Italian/American nuclear physicist[64]
Johanna Levelt Sengers, Dutch/American physicist[65]
Hertha Sponer (1895–1968), German/American physicist and chemist[66]
Isabelle Stone (1868–1944), American thin-film physicist and educator[67]
Katharine Way (1903–1995), American nuclear physicist[68]
Leona Woods (1919–1986), American nuclear physicist
Chien-Shiung Wu (1912–1997), Chinese-American physicist (nuclear physics, (non) conservation of parity)
Sau Lan Wu, Chinese-American particle physicist[69]
Xide Xie (Hsi-teh Hsieh) (1921–2000), Chinese physicist[70]
Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (1921–), American medical physicist (Nobel prize for radioimmunoassay)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fem...th_century

They all contributed successfully to their respective fields and without their input and that of thousands more, we wouldn't be where we are today, even without the most minor contributions. Science isn't done by single popular, memorable individuals but is a collective effort by masses of trained, educated and equal intellects.

Just because there are only a few really famous pop culture names of scientists you can think of, that doesn't mean anything.

I'll just close this textual, factual beat-down by referring you to this as well:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_of_wo...s_articles

Now, would you kindly go and reevaluate your ignorance? Good. Drinking Beverage

"Humans always measure what they see in front of them to what they already know. They will deny anything outside of that. They are shallow lifeforms, so enthralled with superficial appearances that they fail to see the truth."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like MrAttacus's post
22-06-2013, 10:57 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
I doubt he will. He's as delusional as any theist.

Sent From My NEO x5....
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-06-2013, 11:06 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
(22-06-2013 10:34 AM)MrAttacus Wrote:  I will point out that the claim that women are less involved in Science, and have contributed to Science, and therefore society and the world, less than men is an unfounded assertion.

The depressing truth to that is, due to a variety of repulsive and pathetic historical practices and attitudes (enduring to the present day, if in somewhat diluted condition - as evidenced by our atavistic troglodyte of an OP), that most public spheres (certainly as judged by the historical record) are dominated by men.

That so many women were able to make profound contributions in spite of the abject and unfair conditions they were forced to labour under is remarkable.

I suppose one immediately obvious contribution is by the OP's own mother. However many children she did have, she didn't have more; that at least spared the world from the possibility of another individual who, whoever unlikely such a course, might have grown into the same sort of shamefully degenerate individual the OP blossomed into.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes cjlr's post
22-06-2013, 11:10 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
(22-06-2013 10:57 AM)Stephen Charchuk Wrote:  I doubt he will. He's as delusional as any theist.

Laugh out load

Well...I tried, I suppose. Undecided

Although I'm convinced that he's just a troll, and doesn't really belief what he says; the name 'GothKid' on its own has implications about his character.

I'm sure he can't seriously believe what he says...right?...right?? Confused

"Humans always measure what they see in front of them to what they already know. They will deny anything outside of that. They are shallow lifeforms, so enthralled with superficial appearances that they fail to see the truth."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-06-2013, 11:13 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
Children is the most obvious answer.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
22-06-2013, 11:15 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
That you don't perceive any contributions by women says more about your own ignorance than it does about women.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes DingusVonWarhammer's post
22-06-2013, 11:23 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
(22-06-2013 11:10 AM)MrAttacus Wrote:  
(22-06-2013 10:57 AM)Stephen Charchuk Wrote:  I doubt he will. He's as delusional as any theist.

Laugh out load

Well...I tried, I suppose. Undecided

Although I'm convinced that he's just a troll, and doesn't really belief what he says; the name 'GothKid' on its own has implications about his character.

I'm sure he can't seriously believe what he says...right?...right?? Confused

there are people that express the same things "gothkid" does but he might just be fucking with us or actually be one, we likely wont ever know, but the wilful blindness to our responses makes him seem to just be trolling, though that doesn't mean he doesn't actually believe these things.

basically its impossible for us to know if he actually believes the shit he's peddling but theres a fair possibility he does

if its any consolation i did like the "textual, factual beat-down" even if he never reads it/comments on it was badass Smile

"Villain, i have done thy mother" - Aaron, Act IV, Scene II of Titus Andronicus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes palnai's post
22-06-2013, 11:26 AM (This post was last modified: 22-06-2013 11:34 AM by MrAttacus.)
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
(22-06-2013 11:06 AM)cjlr Wrote:  
(22-06-2013 10:34 AM)MrAttacus Wrote:  I will point out that the claim that women are less involved in Science, and have contributed to Science, and therefore society and the world, less than men is an unfounded assertion.

The depressing truth to that is, due to a variety of repulsive and pathetic historical practices and attitudes (enduring to the present day, if in somewhat diluted condition - as evidenced by our atavistic troglodyte of an OP), that most public spheres (certainly as judged by the historical record) are dominated by men.

That so many women were able to make profound contributions in spite of the abject and unfair conditions they were forced to labour under is remarkable.

I suppose one immediately obvious contribution is by the OP's own mother. However many children she did have, she didn't have more; that at least spared the world from the possibility of another individual who, whoever unlikely such a course, might have grown into the same sort of shamefully degenerate individual the OP blossomed into.

Well I'm not sure how someone just so happening to have fewer children than any unspecified higher amount, because of random biological reasons, is an achievement. Laugh out load

Unless, of course, the mother selectively controlled how many offspring were produced, then, I suppose, that is an achievement...but only if it was certain or very likely that the excess offspring would become a shamefully degenerated atavistic troglodyte...although talking about 'potential' children gets you into the illogical realm of pro-lifer logic...Consider

...as for whether most public spheres are still dominated by men, even if that was true, that shouldn't matter for Science because the gender of the scientists that study reality has no bearing on the results; in Science it doesn't matter who the scientists are, as long as it gets done.

Science is just the practice of realizing just what kind of a platonic cave we actually live in and how the thing works and why. Its a practice that is gender-less and inhuman; it could be done by another totally different but equally competent species and it would make no difference.

And no, I don't think the OP is evidence of any practices and attitudes, because they're probably just a troll. Drinking Beverage

"Humans always measure what they see in front of them to what they already know. They will deny anything outside of that. They are shallow lifeforms, so enthralled with superficial appearances that they fail to see the truth."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes MrAttacus's post
22-06-2013, 11:32 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
(22-06-2013 11:23 AM)palnai Wrote:  if its any consolation i did like the "textual, factual beat-down" even if he never reads it/comments on it was badass Smile

Why, thank you very much. Thumbsup That was consolation enough. Bowing

I suppose it is possible to be delusional and a troll at the same time. Like a theist 'trolling for Jesus' kind of thing; they really believe what they preach but they just enjoy winding the opposition up anyway because they think they deserve it for disagreeing with them. Rolleyes

Drinking Beverage

"Humans always measure what they see in front of them to what they already know. They will deny anything outside of that. They are shallow lifeforms, so enthralled with superficial appearances that they fail to see the truth."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes MrAttacus's post
22-06-2013, 11:32 AM
RE: You have 10 seconds to name ONE contribution to the world made by a woman
Are we really entertaining this troll? Usually I would be so far in there, proving him wrong, but his claim is so fucked up that I ain't even trying.


Yo, dipshit Gothkid, if you think women made no controbution to anything, you don't deserve the genes your mom contributed to you.

[Image: 0013382F-E507-48AE-906B-53008666631C-757...cc3639.jpg]
Credit goes to UndercoverAtheist.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: