Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
07-05-2017, 11:33 AM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 06:58 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 09:25 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  The right oils have made all kinds of differences, including calming her down in stressful situations almost instantly. The useful thing is that the placebo effect is much less of a problem with animals.

Dogs rely on your mood and attitude to base their actions on. They don't actually have much of a vocabulary, but your tone of voice, facial expression, where you look, how fast you breathe, your body temperature are all guidelines for her behavior. And there are a lot more things they can read, we are only just uncovering things like dogs knowing ahead of time when you will have a seizure, or even a heart attack. They read YOU like a book.

Actually I've got a friend with seizure issues. More than once on public transportation which she has to take, her dog has began barking at people the way he barks at her, when a seizure is close to happening.

Each time within a few bus stops those individuals had seizures.

She spoke to her doctor about it, she said there might be an odor given off before a seizure that the dog picks up on. It's not only about reading an individual.

As far as the oils, I know with my dog some did have an effect -- some made him sneeze and feel miserable. I'd remove it and he'd perk up and stop sneezing.

Lavender calmed him...I would use it on the 4th of July, when I'd take him to the basement. He hated going to the basement...he didn't like enclosed spaces (wouldn't go into a crate either). But the lavender helped him relax. I know this because it's not something I'd use normally.

Dogs have incredible senses of smell, so it's little wonder that certain odors could affect them. My dog also went nuts when I cooked seafood. He loved seafood.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 11:49 AM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
I like the fragrance of lavender and have a spray that I use on my blanket and sometimes my pillow....just because I like it. I also have bubble bath that is lavender and vanilla (my two favorite fragrances).

We planted some lavender inn pots on the patio to help repel mosquitos...right now they aren't flowered but I hope they will do well.

I have a little bottle of eucalyptus oil because sometimes that's the only thing that can break through my sinuses.

But, I don't see essential oils as any kind of cure for anything.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 11:54 AM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 10:53 AM)Aliza Wrote:  Yes, of course they are bullshit. Anything characterized as "multilevel marketing" and or "cure all" is by default bullshit.

fixed

#sigh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like GirlyMan's post
07-05-2017, 12:03 PM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 11:49 AM)Anjele Wrote:  I like the fragrance of lavender and have a spray that I use on my blanket and sometimes my pillow....just because I like it. I also have bubble bath that is lavender and vanilla (my two favorite fragrances).

We planted some lavender inn pots on the patio to help repel mosquitos...right now they aren't flowered but I hope they will do well.

I have a little bottle of eucalyptus oil because sometimes that's the only thing that can break through my sinuses.

But, I don't see essential oils as any kind of cure for anything.

I can see some of them working for skin or scalp conditions. There's probably a few that are good for the gut in various ways. It's the "essential" bit that's essence of bullshit. They ain't essential amino acids, vitamins, or minerals for fuck's sake.

#sigh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 12:10 PM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 11:33 AM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(07-05-2017 06:58 AM)Dom Wrote:  Dogs rely on your mood and attitude to base their actions on. They don't actually have much of a vocabulary, but your tone of voice, facial expression, where you look, how fast you breathe, your body temperature are all guidelines for her behavior. And there are a lot more things they can read, we are only just uncovering things like dogs knowing ahead of time when you will have a seizure, or even a heart attack. They read YOU like a book.

Actually I've got a friend with seizure issues. More than once on public transportation which she has to take, her dog has began barking at people the way he barks at her, when a seizure is close to happening.

Each time within a few bus stops those individuals had seizures.

She spoke to her doctor about it, she said there might be an odor given off before a seizure that the dog picks up on. It's not only about reading an individual.

As far as the oils, I know with my dog some did have an effect -- some made him sneeze and feel miserable. I'd remove it and he'd perk up and stop sneezing.

Lavender calmed him...I would use it on the 4th of July, when I'd take him to the basement. He hated going to the basement...he didn't like enclosed spaces (wouldn't go into a crate either). But the lavender helped him relax. I know this because it's not something I'd use normally.

Dogs have incredible senses of smell, so it's little wonder that certain odors could affect them. My dog also went nuts when I cooked seafood. He loved seafood.

Oh yes, most dogs have scents as a huge part of their perception.

However, the reactions/expectations/attitudes of their owners pretty much override everything. That's what makes them trainable, if humans learn how to communicate to the dog what exactly it is that they want.

If you open the basement door the first time, and the dog spooks, you will react a certain way. The dog remembers this. Next time you open that door, the dog will re-play what happened before, because you already expect it and you react in ways the dog perceives even before it happens. In other words, the dog repeats the behavior because you are already tensing up in response to your expectations as you open the door. If you start expecting a different behavior, you will give off a different reaction to your anticipation of results, and the dog will change, too.

I don't know if this makes any sense to you, I find it very difficult to phrase it.

It is difficult to determine whether your dog is actually reacting to the scent, or whether he is reacting to your reaction to the scent. (It doesn't really matter to you though - you get the results either way)

That said, I don't poopoo herbal claims, most of our drugs are based on natural effects of plants. I do poopoo that this or that scent will have the same effect on all dogs. The precise cause of the results is questionable. And I am pretty sure you can't cure cancer with chamomile scent.

So one thing is for sure - both people and other animals enjoy scents, associate events with them, and some specific scents do help certain individuals with specific things - for whatever reasons.

Now I am going back to smelling the roses - well, as soon as the buds open....Tongue

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 04:25 PM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 12:10 PM)Dom Wrote:  
(07-05-2017 11:33 AM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Actually I've got a friend with seizure issues. More than once on public transportation which she has to take, her dog has began barking at people the way he barks at her, when a seizure is close to happening.

Each time within a few bus stops those individuals had seizures.

She spoke to her doctor about it, she said there might be an odor given off before a seizure that the dog picks up on. It's not only about reading an individual.

As far as the oils, I know with my dog some did have an effect -- some made him sneeze and feel miserable. I'd remove it and he'd perk up and stop sneezing.

Lavender calmed him...I would use it on the 4th of July, when I'd take him to the basement. He hated going to the basement...he didn't like enclosed spaces (wouldn't go into a crate either). But the lavender helped him relax. I know this because it's not something I'd use normally.

Dogs have incredible senses of smell, so it's little wonder that certain odors could affect them. My dog also went nuts when I cooked seafood. He loved seafood.

Oh yes, most dogs have scents as a huge part of their perception.

However, the reactions/expectations/attitudes of their owners pretty much override everything. That's what makes them trainable, if humans learn how to communicate to the dog what exactly it is that they want.

If you open the basement door the first time, and the dog spooks, you will react a certain way. The dog remembers this. Next time you open that door, the dog will re-play what happened before, because you already expect it and you react in ways the dog perceives even before it happens. In other words, the dog repeats the behavior because you are already tensing up in response to your expectations as you open the door. If you start expecting a different behavior, you will give off a different reaction to your anticipation of results, and the dog will change, too.

I don't know if this makes any sense to you, I find it very difficult to phrase it.

It is difficult to determine whether your dog is actually reacting to the scent, or whether he is reacting to your reaction to the scent. (It doesn't really matter to you though - you get the results either way)

That said, I don't poopoo herbal claims, most of our drugs are based on natural effects of plants. I do poopoo that this or that scent will have the same effect on all dogs. The precise cause of the results is questionable. And I am pretty sure you can't cure cancer with chamomile scent.

So one thing is for sure - both people and other animals enjoy scents, associate events with them, and some specific scents do help certain individuals with specific things - for whatever reasons.

Now I am going back to smelling the roses - well, as soon as the buds open....Tongue

The first time he went into the basement just after we moved in, he just followed us like anytime. It wasn't until after he was in there, he looked around and said fuck this...doggy style and wanted out.

The crate problem was already an issue.

He used to go through the garden and smell flowers...it was funny to watch. Some he liked more than others.

Roses made him sneeze too.

Lavender though he really did seem to like and it really did calm him. I wished I'd learned about it sooner. It would have helped him and our time in the basement. I've never used it in the house or anywhere else because my husband can't stand it.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 05:05 PM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(06-05-2017 09:25 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  I've come to learn a lot about essential oils recently, and was surprised to find out there's a legitimate case for their use with animals: zoopharmacognasy. They aren't supposed to be a miracle cure for everything, but they can alleviate a lot of problems. The amazing thing is that animals self-select the oils they need, meaning they can diagnose simple problems in themselves better than a vet can and often treat themselves without the need for harsher medicine. This must be a leftover skill from life in the wild.

I'd have called this all bullshit not long ago, but I'm now convinced. And I'm not easily convinced. My wife has attended several courses about it, and the animal charity she works with have adopted their use as a matter of course. Vets are slowly coming round to it, but some are resisting.

It was developed by a lady called Caroline Ingraham, and you can find her website easily enough if you are interested. I've seen the results on my own dog first hand, and it is astonishing. The right oils have made all kinds of differences, including calming her down in stressful situations almost instantly. The useful thing is that the placebo effect is much less of a problem with animals.

Caroline does suggest that oils can help humans too. Again, any claims of them being cures for everything is ridiculous. They are natural remedies for common problems, which help the body heal itself. They must be high quality pure ingredients which are typically quite expensive, or else they are useless. And they aren't meant to be used to the exclusion of regular medicine when needed.

I remain skeptical.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-05-2017, 09:37 PM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
I remain allergic.

I'm not a huge fan of any strong scents but some of the natural ones will give me a splitting migraine. Certain forms of incense and patchouli oil are particularly noxious.

---
Flesh and blood of a dead star, slain in the apocalypse of supernova, resurrected by four billion years of continuous autocatalytic reaction and crowned with the emergent property of sentience in the dream that the universe might one day understand itself.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-05-2017, 03:29 AM (This post was last modified: 08-05-2017 03:35 AM by Robvalue.)
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 06:58 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 09:25 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  The right oils have made all kinds of differences, including calming her down in stressful situations almost instantly. The useful thing is that the placebo effect is much less of a problem with animals.

Incorrect. The placebo effect in your dog does not come from the used item, but from YOU. The dog reads your facial expressions and body language and acts accordingly. Use the stuff for a while longer, then give her a placebo while you act exactly the same (that part is very, very hard to do with a dog who knows you, it is likely impossible for you to hide that you are expecting a different outcome) and she will still calm down.

Dogs rely on your mood and attitude to base their actions on. They don't actually have much of a vocabulary, but your tone of voice, facial expression, where you look, how fast you breathe, your body temperature are all guidelines for her behavior. And there are a lot more things they can read, we are only just uncovering things like dogs knowing ahead of time when you will have a seizure, or even a heart attack. They read YOU like a book.

If you expect her to be worried, or excited, or calm, or aggressive, you show these things to her. Whether you want to or not. Many dog trainers hence train the people, not the dogs.

Good points, but I said it was less of a problem, not no problem at all. You've made me realize I was probably underestimating this effect though.

I have a website here which discusses the issues and terminology surrounding religion and atheism. It's hopefully user friendly to all.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-05-2017, 03:31 AM
RE: Young Living Essential Oils is a Scam
(07-05-2017 05:05 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(06-05-2017 09:25 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  I've come to learn a lot about essential oils recently, and was surprised to find out there's a legitimate case for their use with animals: zoopharmacognasy. They aren't supposed to be a miracle cure for everything, but they can alleviate a lot of problems. The amazing thing is that animals self-select the oils they need, meaning they can diagnose simple problems in themselves better than a vet can and often treat themselves without the need for harsher medicine. This must be a leftover skill from life in the wild.

I'd have called this all bullshit not long ago, but I'm now convinced. And I'm not easily convinced. My wife has attended several courses about it, and the animal charity she works with have adopted their use as a matter of course. Vets are slowly coming round to it, but some are resisting.

It was developed by a lady called Caroline Ingraham, and you can find her website easily enough if you are interested. I've seen the results on my own dog first hand, and it is astonishing. The right oils have made all kinds of differences, including calming her down in stressful situations almost instantly. The useful thing is that the placebo effect is much less of a problem with animals.

Caroline does suggest that oils can help humans too. Again, any claims of them being cures for everything is ridiculous. They are natural remedies for common problems, which help the body heal itself. They must be high quality pure ingredients which are typically quite expensive, or else they are useless. And they aren't meant to be used to the exclusion of regular medicine when needed.

I remain skeptical.

I don't blame you at all Smile I don't expect anyone to alter their beliefs based on what I've said. Just that maybe it's worth looking into some more.

I have a website here which discusses the issues and terminology surrounding religion and atheism. It's hopefully user friendly to all.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: