Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
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17-02-2014, 09:43 AM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
Seasoned kale chips

- 2 bunches of kale
- Steak seasoning salt
- 1-2tbsp of olive oil
- 1 tbsp flax seed

Rip the kale into bite sized pieces in a bigass salad bowl. Drizzle olive oil over them. Toss them by hand and mix them around till they are completely covered in the olive oil, you want them saturated.

Put the pieces evenly spread out on cookie sheets. Sprinkle a little steak seasoning salt onto them (depending on your taste). Sprinkle flax seeds over them.

Toss in the oven at 350F for 10-15 minutes, checking at the 10 minute mark to see if crispy. Enjoy kale chips.

Official ordained minister of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Please pm me with prayer requests to his noodly goodness. Remember, he boiled for your sins and loves you. Carbo Diem! RAmen.
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19-02-2014, 01:36 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
(14-03-2013 12:16 PM)RedHead Confetti Wrote:  Well, cooking and recipe swaps I can totally help with. What do you want, and I've probably got two or three versions you can have Smile I love cooking, and being that I'm allergic to red meat, and pork I've learned a lot about substitution and experimentation.

Anyway, here are two recipes from my family.

Linda's Finnish Bread
This recipe is from an auntie who married in, and who's family was from *drumroll* Finland! You know, in case you coldn't have a guess. It's super simple, I've never had anyone mess it up. You can substitute vegan ingredients, but the texture will be a little off. I'm still working on that bit.
2 c. Milk
4 T. butter
3/4 c. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2 pkg. yeast
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp cardamon
5 1/2- 5 3/4 c. flour

Dissolve yeast in 1/4 c. lukewarm water. Scald milk, then add butter, sugar and salt. Let cool to lukewarm.
Pour into lg. mixing bowl. Stir in dissolved yeast; add spices and 2 1/2 c. flour. Beat with electric mixer on low, 30 seconds., scraping often.
Beat at high speed 2 min. Beat in 3 c. flour, by hand. Turn on to well floured surface and knead 8-10 min (adding flour as needed to keep from being sticky). Place in greased bowl, let rise until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.
Divide dough into 4 parts; divide those into 3 parts, roll into ropes and braid.
Place on greased cookie sheet; let rise until double, about 45 min.
Bake at 350 for 20 min, or until golden brown. Brush with 1 beaten egg and
1 T. water, right out of oven.


Grandma Smith's No-Bakes
My Dad's Mum was from Alabama and specialised in cheap-to-make food. That happens when you've got 13 kids, after all. She loved cooking, though, and she used to make these for us when ever we'd go see her and Grandpa.

All measurements are approximate. I've measured the best I can, so you'll have to eyeball it.

1 stick of butter
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup milk
3T baking cocoa-- unsweetened
3 cups or so quick oats
1 to 1 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter

Whisk the sugar and cocoa together in a pan, mixing well (otherwise you'll have lumps when you add the liquid). Then add milk, and butter. Stir gently over medium heat mixing well. Bring to a rolling boil, stirring very frequently.

When you get it to a rolling boil, start timing, three minutes. If it's very humid, you can count four-- no longer, however. Immediately turn down the heat to low (if you have an electric stove, just turn off the heat, the cooling burner will be hot enough), and plop the peanut butter in, and mix well. It'll swirl all through, but eventually it will mix in.

Pull the pan off the heat and toss it on to a trivet or heat-proof thing on the counter. Throw in the oatmeal, and stir like crazy! It's going to et really stiff. Drop by spoon-fulls on to foil, parchment or wax paper. They should set up within a couple hours; if they stay a little soft or gooey, they should be fine after sitting out over night. Then throw them into a tupperware-like container. They supposedly last two weeks, but I've never been able to keep them around long enough to find out.

Deserves a bump imo - Moodie x
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19-02-2014, 02:44 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
(12-02-2014 06:23 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I am not much of a cook but a friend recently shared this recipe so I made it today. It's really good! Great dish for everyone who is freezing right now. I warmed up some dinner rolls to serve with it. No worries about cooking tomorrow! Grab your BIG Crockpot.

The Best Crockpot Beef Stew
Ingredients
2 pounds beef stew meat, (cut into bite-sized pieces) - I used about 2-1/2 pounds
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp pepper
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 celery ribs, sliced - I added a little more
2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
6oz can tomato paste
32oz beef broth
2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 cups baby carrots - I just used regular carrots cut into chunks
4-5 small red potatoes,cut into bite-sized pieces (about 3 cups)
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon oregano
1 cups frozen peas
1 cup frozen corn
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup water

Directions:
1. Combine beef, celery, carrots, red onion, potatoes, salt, pepper, garlic, parsley, oregano, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, and tomato paste in the crock pot. I used a 6 qt crockpot for this stew. Cook on LOW for 10 hours or on HIGH for 6-7 hours.

2. About 30 minutes before serving, mix the flour and the water together in a small dish and pour into the crockpot. Mix until well combined. This will add a nice thickness to the stew. Next add in your frozen peas and corn. Continue cooking covered for 30 minutes.

You don't brown the beef in a skillet?

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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19-02-2014, 03:10 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
(19-02-2014 02:44 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(12-02-2014 06:23 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I am not much of a cook but a friend recently shared this recipe so I made it today. It's really good! Great dish for everyone who is freezing right now. I warmed up some dinner rolls to serve with it. No worries about cooking tomorrow! Grab your BIG Crockpot.

The Best Crockpot Beef Stew
Ingredients
2 pounds beef stew meat, (cut into bite-sized pieces) - I used about 2-1/2 pounds
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp pepper
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 celery ribs, sliced - I added a little more
2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
6oz can tomato paste
32oz beef broth
2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 cups baby carrots - I just used regular carrots cut into chunks
4-5 small red potatoes,cut into bite-sized pieces (about 3 cups)
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon oregano
1 cups frozen peas
1 cup frozen corn
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup water

Directions:
1. Combine beef, celery, carrots, red onion, potatoes, salt, pepper, garlic, parsley, oregano, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, and tomato paste in the crock pot. I used a 6 qt crockpot for this stew. Cook on LOW for 10 hours or on HIGH for 6-7 hours.

2. About 30 minutes before serving, mix the flour and the water together in a small dish and pour into the crockpot. Mix until well combined. This will add a nice thickness to the stew. Next add in your frozen peas and corn. Continue cooking covered for 30 minutes.

You don't brown the beef in a skillet?

I certainly did. I thought it was assumed.

Just visiting.

-SR
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19-02-2014, 05:45 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
I didn't and it still turned out great! The meat was so tender. I considered it but my dislike for cooking kicked in and I said...damn, that's another step and a pan to clean. Tongue

See here they are, the bruises, some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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19-02-2014, 05:59 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
(19-02-2014 05:45 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I didn't and it still turned out great! The meat was so tender. I considered it but my dislike for cooking kicked in and I said...damn, that's another step and a pan to clean. Tongue

Fair enough, but browning it does add flavor. Yes

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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20-02-2014, 01:15 AM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
Super-easy turkey meatloaf:
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1 box instant (stove-top type) stuffing mix
  • 1 egg, beaten
Prepare stuffing mix according to package directions. Add turkey and egg; knead together; form into loaf. Bake in loaf pan in preheated 350°F oven for about 60-70 minutes (should be hot and thoroughly cooked in the center). Serve with cranberry sauce and gravy.

This tastes like roast turkey with stuffing, and doesn't require any additional seasonings because there's ample seasoning in the stuffing mix.
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20-02-2014, 02:06 AM (This post was last modified: 20-02-2014 07:25 AM by Dee.)
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
Just a few ingredient hints:

Whatever dish, dry red or dry white wine will work in, always use it.

Explore fresh (will be very green and somewhat pliant)), organic bay leaf in soups and stews. A bit more pricy, but you will not believe the difference--like the difference between a $12 and $40 bottle of wine.

Cut way, way back on salt and let the flavors of your ingredients caress your palate--very sexy

Fresh garlic. Give up the powder.

Fresh herbs, at least: thyme, basil, oregano, . . .

Explore mushrooms; add them where you can

I have been cooking for 42 years and the above ingredients will take the mundane meal into the realm of special.

"If you want a happy ending, that depends, of course, on where you stop your story." Orson Welles
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06-03-2014, 11:16 AM (This post was last modified: 06-03-2014 11:29 AM by Lienda Bella.)
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
First, I will tell you about my history with fried bread. You probably know what a tortilla is. Fried bread is thicker. When I was a child in grade school, the Navajos would do something cultural every year. Some of my peers said "no" to certain foods they haven't tried yet. I tried different things that they rejected and haven't been very disappointed. I'll never understand why they said no to fresh cheddar at a farm one time. It was very delicious. One of the items they didn't reject as fast as wild deer meat, blue corn dip and cornbread was fried bread.

Fried bread is still sold in some places in North West New Mexico, USA these days. Likely the larger flea market between Farmington and Aztec does during the weekend somewhere. One kid had ordered ten fried bread, and I got to enjoy one. My family was very broke at the time. I remembered it as fondly as the other "different" food, and when I was a teen someone was serving something they called Navajo tacos in a town further west. We liked it.

More time went buy and a news paper put out some recipes. I have the page right here. It's old and torn, so the date is missing. It has some white lady drawn on it with a creepy look and a big garden hat, with "Summer Cheese Cake" across her chest. Well, the Navajo Taco recipe is next and just above that. We've cooked it a few times, and need to put it on a card. The paper isn't going to last forever.

We prefer to fry the bread in canola oil. It doesn't have to be cast iron. I've fried the bread in non-stick. I've been having lunch lately with this. I combined the dry ingredients and put it into a container. Then I put water into it later, and used some of the dry mixture to keep it from sticking. The oil needs to be hot, or else it turns out a little ugly. The bread should immediately get bubbles in it and the parts that touch the skillet should be light brown. I don't like salsa, hamburger or lettuce on it. I just like to put sour cream, pinto beans, a little bit of cheddar, a little bit of chopped onion and tomato. I usually like a little round fried bread without anything on top to go with it. Other times I just want the bread only.

Well, here it is how it was in the new paper.

Navajo Tacos

Mrs. Gene Stark [Is not me]
(edited out address)

Prepare fry bread first:
4 c. sifted all-purpose flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 c. warm water (or enough to make a soft work-able dough)
Mix dry ingredients, then add water. Cover bowl with a very damp cloth and set aside.

Prepare next:
1 1/2 lbs. hamburger (cook and crumble in a skillet) drained of liquids
1 lb. of cheddar cheese (grated)
1 large onion
1 large can of pinto beans (home-cooked are the best)

Heat about 2 to 3 inches of shortening in a heavy deep skillet. It should be very hot. When shortening is ready pinch off dough, roll on balls, then roll out just as you would a pie crust. ["You" was typed as "your" in the news paper.] Fry on both sides and drain on paper towels. Begin layering with hamburger, beans, cheese and onions. Last garnish with shredded lettuce and diced tomatoes. "Picante" sauce or any hot sauce can be passed at the table. Any leftover dough can be fried and eaten with honey to compliment the meal. Serves 4 to 5.

Yatta yatta bluh bluh
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09-04-2014, 07:10 PM
RE: Your cooking recipes...hints and tips.
Chocolate bark

Ingredients
A bag of chocolate chips that are usually used in baking cookies.
Hard candy of your choice, smashed into small chunks and powder. Make it about four regular sized lollipops that don't have the gun in the middle.

Melt the chocolate and stir in 3/4 of the smashed hard candy. Spread the chocolate out over a sheet of parchment paper. Sprinkle the rest of the candy on top of it for looks. Put the sheet into the refrigerator to hasten the cooling of the chocolate.

The chocolate will melt in your hands, but you can put whatever flavor you want in there.
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