Your greatest piece of good fortune
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06-06-2015, 12:29 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
Linda Carter?

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
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06-06-2015, 12:57 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
Being born into a family that had wanderlust stamped into its genes.

Having such a wonderful son.

Falling in love with my Songbird, after ten years of telling myself that I'd never fall in love again.

Surviving an auto accident without a scratch that, had my vehicle been about six inches to the right, would almost certainly have killed me.
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06-06-2015, 05:10 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
When I was 15 I went through an elongated stage of depression. I'm not quite sure I remember what the impetus was but I believe some of it stemmed from the rejection of any desire for relationship that my biological father so readily bestowed on me.

One particular day I had gotten into a rather heated argument with my mum which concluded with me on the receiving end of some loathsome polemics about not amounting to anything. At that point I decided to end my life. The next day I came home from school, went to our basement with a rope, made a noose and Zeus as my witness was ready to drop off the chair I was standing on. As chance would have it a friend of mine, whom I hadn't seen in weeks, just so happened to stop by. He had rang the door bell which I hadn't heard, then decided to walk around the side of my house only to look into the basement window and see me there. He knocked. I stepped off the chair and walked upstairs to let him in.

I didn't kill myself that day and I since then I have never again had one incline to do it. I used to chalk that up to god but realize now that it was merely chance / probability; although I'm damn happy that guy stopped because If successful I sure would have made a lot of people unhappy and missed out on a wonderful life! Big Grin

**Crickets** -- God
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06-06-2015, 06:22 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
Greatest piece of fortune: My best friend in fifth grade deciding she was going to play clarinet, so I decided to do that also. She didn't actually wind up playing, but my parents had already rented the Bundy and I was the one who wound up in clarinet class, falling in love with the instrument, music, and music-making.
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06-06-2015, 06:28 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
Wouldn't know. Has never been lucky/fortunate. Anything good that has ever happened in my life is due to sufficient experience and awareness. It doesn't happen that often.

[Image: 20cad83ad8d757191e2878b0f4bf05a9.png]
"Don't answer that. A rhetorical question."
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06-06-2015, 09:08 AM
Re: Your greatest piece of good fortune
My greatest: still being alive.

I almost died from alcohol poisoning as a kid. I survived a heart attack around 23 years old, and two drug overdoses when I was younger. There's a few other ignorant things that I'm lucky to have survived.

Looking back now, it all seems pretty stupid.
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06-06-2015, 09:30 AM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
(06-06-2015 12:57 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  Being born into a family that had wanderlust stamped into its genes.

Having such a wonderful son.

Falling in love with my Songbird, after ten years of telling myself that I'd never fall in love again.

Surviving an auto accident without a scratch that, had my vehicle been about six inches to the right, would almost certainly have killed me.

I almost forgot: being born a white American male.

Gosh, it's easy to take that for granted.
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06-06-2015, 11:17 PM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
Being born with an upbeat outlook, always seeing the glass as about to be refilled, and a visceral dislike of the phrase "it can't be done".

And being in an airplane crash that probably saved my life.

As a teenager I got involved with the restoration of a Waco UPF-7 biplane that has been bought as a basket case that had sat derelict outside in the weather for 10 years. When it came time to decide whether to overhaul the engine or just put oil in it the less expensive option was taken (more than just silly because the cost of overhauling that particular engine was not prohibitive compared to the cost of the rest of the restoration).

After the airplane was complete and flown a few hours one of the owners and I flew it to an airshow. I was still a student pilot then so the owner did all the flying. The owner's total time in taildraggers was the few hours of checkout in the Waco, so the brisk crosswind when we departed the show for home was not doing us any favors. As the tail came up during the takeoff roll the airplane instantly began to weathervane. The owner, not yet used to how taildraggers need full corrective rudder and even some brake to keep them lined up only pushed a little rudder, which did nothing, and the weathervane went unrecoverable. So he yanked it off the ground.

It staggered a few feet up, into ground effect, then a wing dropped as it stalled. Somehow it struck the runway flat on the mains and began a vicious groundloop, so the owner desperately hauled it back into the air again. Again, it dropped a wing half stalled, and then for just a moment, bit the air and began to fly.

But the crosswind was gusty, and the gust that held us up for that splinter of a second abated. The nose pitched down and I remember as clearly as if it were five minutes ago looking at the surface of the runway straight ahead and thinking as calmly as reviewing a weather forecast: "people get hurt when this happens". This time striking the runway tore off an entire gear leg, destroyed a wing, and broke up the propellor before the engine stopped.

We stepped out of it without a scratch.

You can't kill an antique airplane, you only remand it back to restoration. Back in the hangar, the question of engine overhaul was now a matter of law. Sudden engine stoppage requires engine teardown and inspection.

The mechanics disassembling the engine immediately found chunks of torn metal as the parts came off - much more than could be accounted for in the few revolutions the engine made after hitting the ground. The metal bits were identified as the remains of the cage of the main crankshaft thrust ball bearing, which was coming apart due to advanced corrosion - coming apart as we were flying it to the airshow. That ten years sitting derelict outside had ruined the engine.

The mechanics surmised that the degree of disintegration at the time the engine was stopped by the crash would have allowed no more than 30 minutes more operation before the bearing would have totally gone to pieces, let all the oil in the engine flood out and seize the crankshaft. A seized engine can be violent enough to tear the engine right off the airplane, and 30 minutes out from the airshow airport we might very well have found ourselves in an uncontrollable engineless fabric covered brick over a mountain ridge. At the very least we'd have been deadstick over forested rocky mountain terrain.

So the owner's incompetence that put us in a wreck we walked away from kept us from ending up in a wreck we may not have been able to crawl free of.

For years I thought that was godly providence, but I was more arrogant about my importance to the universe then too.

On my mantle that broken off 9 inches of the propellor tip is still waiting for me to take it to the engravers to have it inscribed: Maintain thine airspeed lest the earth rise up and smite thee.
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06-06-2015, 11:23 PM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
I lost my wallet once. It had more money than I should have been carrying in it. I was at a fair with my kids, while we were backtracking looking for it, I faintly heard my name being called over a P.A.. Someone found and returned it, not a thing missing. Whew!
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06-06-2015, 11:52 PM
RE: Your greatest piece of good fortune
I won ten grand on a scratch ticket once. My brother gave it to me, and right before I scratched it I said I'd split my winnings with him. We both paid some bills and got new stereos together. It was very cool.




.....oh, and the whole cancer thing. Add me to the list of people who kicked it in the balls. Wink

So many cats, so few good recipes.
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