cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
29-10-2013, 09:46 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
Eesh, the time just flies. Another week and then some - gone by.

So, Klan is a band. Heavy organ and a very good drummer. Is this our first trip behind the Iron Curtain? I do think it is...

Now, Poland in 1970 was not a particularly happy place to be. But what else is new? Anyway, these boys went and pissed off the authorities, and, ahem, 'voluntarily' disbanded in 1971 after recording only an EP (eponymous) and a full album, Mrowisko [anthill].

Let's listen in to a few tracks.

Beginning with Klan - Automaty [machines]:




From Mrowisko:
Nerwy Miast [city nerves]



Nasze Myśli [thoughts]




And to play us out, Kuszenie [temptation]



... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
05-11-2013, 07:15 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
MUSIC.

Where were we? Poland?

Aight. Next door to that. A country which no longer exists. Czechoslovakia. Though these guys are much more of the Czech side of things. A rotating cast finally hit the studio in 1971 and recorded Kure v Hodinkach [clocks and chickens]. The record was promptly banned by the authorities.

Let's begin with something a bit softer. The smoke and me.




And into rám příštích obrazů [frames for future paintings]:



Jenom láska ví kam [only love knows]:



Týden v elektrickém městě [a week in electric city]:




And finally, let's go home tonight to the strains of pár století [a couple centuries]:




So yes. It is a fiercely masterful little record.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-11-2013, 05:46 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
This one may actually require hallucinogens to be good Confused





Alright alright, I'll stop mucking up your thread Tongue
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-11-2013, 08:10 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
Oh, an atheist listening to bands he's never heard of?

How original is that!

Drinking Beverage
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-11-2013, 08:40 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
(07-11-2013 08:10 PM)RBF Wrote:  Oh, an atheist listening to bands he's never heard of?

How original is that!

Drinking Beverage

Ahahahah. Hahaha. Ha. I don't get it.

Look, you must be new at this. Trolling is a art.

Any old idiot can say incoherently stupid things. NOT A ART. How can a person listen to bands that person has never heard of?

And there are just so many other perfectly valid insults and stereotypes you could have busted out!

2/10. First try; lacks effort. Would troll again.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes cjlr's post
24-11-2013, 07:24 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
Shit, this needs a bump.

But I don't really have much on hand...

Hong Kong it is. The Beatles played a show in '64. I guess that's when you could start the HK psych clock. A real entrepot, as ever; lots of neat stuff happening.

So Teddy Robin had a band (the Playboys). This is them:



And also a random video segment, because why not?




He's done a bit of everything since then, really - acting and directing, production, music of all kinds...

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-11-2013, 10:14 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
So, I rounded up a couple more songs. Actually most of the HK-pop ('specially the anglo pop) is really more pre-psychedelic. It's like 1964 never ended!




Fun fact: lot of the guys in the Mystics have roots going back to the Macau side of the bay.












(and yes, they all look like charmingly dorky Beatles wannabes on the album covers)

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-11-2013, 10:34 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
Hmm. Today's a two-for-one!

From briefly mentioning a couple guys from Macau, we can head back to Portugal... The ol' fascist regime was creaking along, but the colonial wars and economic malaise had it on its last legs. And actually the Guerra do Ultramar were astoundingly nightmarish. Like America in Vietnam - 'cept much worse.

And still Xarhanga didn't have a chance to record more than a couple singles, righteous anti-establishment types that they were. But they're very good, so there's that. Shades of David Byron on the vocals for sure.











... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-11-2013, 05:57 PM
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
I am nothing if not a lazy man.

Because I am a lazy man, I return to trod ground. Well - not absolutely so, since it is of course still new selections. But more charted than un-.

So, the aforementioned Hiro Yanagida [柳田 ヒロ]. His first music gig was playing covers in a Monkees fan club back in '66... Between gigs with Foodbrain and 3L among others (see my previous post Thumbsup ), he put together several jazzy psych-rock albums under his own direction. The two of note for the time being 1970's Milk Time, and 1971's eponymous Hiro Yanagida. The guitarist on both albums is Kimio Mizutani.

From the first - Running Shirts Long (an 8-minute exercise in wailing organ):




From the second - we might start with Good Morning People; an upbeat instrumental jaunt, trading off bright keys and fuzz guitar:




And we close out with Midnight Murder:




(The other two albums being 72's Hiro and 73's Hirocosmos. Maybe some day.)

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-12-2013, 11:55 PM (This post was last modified: 07-12-2013 09:17 AM by cjlr.)
RE: cjlr's Psychedelic Odyssey
This one's gonna be a bandwidth killer.
Angel

So a famous guy died recently. You may have heard of him. I think he was some sort of blood-soaked African communist warlord or something?
(why yes, I do get all my information about foreigners from the comments sections of local newspapers)

But on the other hand, the US did take him off their terrorist watch list... in the year 2008.

So, South Africa, eh? So it's another step into swirling seas of oppression, of repression, of aggression. And if you otherwise were unaware, the last couple days' news coverage ought to have more or less filled you in on the necessary background.

So, South Africa had music. Well, in a manner of speaking. There was no TV, radio was heavily censored, live shows were heavily censored, records were heavily censored - though there was a high-powered border blaster in Mozambique a skip over, Wolfman Jack style! Didn't stop people, of course. Not in SA, nor in any other of the stops along our sprawling Psychedelic Odyssey. Well, not at first. Eventually violent repressive crackdowns take their toll.

We might recall here that the only reason the apartheid National Party came to power in the first place in the '48 elections was because the parliamentary districts were hopelessly gerrymandered; the NP won 40% of the popular vote to the United Party's 50% (lol democracy) but came away with more seats. I mention this by way of introducing the fact that there were always people within South Africa who thought the status quo was bullshit (not, obviously, that many, but still). Which didn't help them when they tried to play overseas, because (especially in the UK) all South Africans were pretty thoroughly cut off from legitimate business transactions, even protest-music hippies...

Now, our first act from this particular time and place are Third Eye. Whose first album opens with just about my favourite version of All Along the Watchtower:




Third Eye were from Durban, but, anybody who's anybody has to head to Johannesburg, which they dutifully did to record their three albums. Which was kind of a logistical problem, since the fine young lady playing the keyboards was 15 at the time, and the rest not much older. So their weekend trips didn't leave much time for retakes. But they gigged around Durban (and the university town up the road in Maritzburg) dutifully for as long as the law let them.

They cut three albums; Awakening, Searching, and Brother. They rocked hard.



Protip: "Third Eye Awakening" is a pain in the fucking ass term to search for.










...

That brings us to Suck.




Designed to offend. Which they succeeded at. Marvelously. With membership from across South Africa and Rhodesia. So they smashed things onstage, and dressed crazy, and recorded one album (all they managed before the crackdown) of very heavy music. The above track is the only one they wrote themselves; they never had a chance to go in to record original stuff, and the album's mostly covers. Awesome covers.

But with The Man breathing down their neck, there wasn't really any money to be had, and living starving on the road only has so much appeal. They called it quits in 71, without ever having had a chance to record the record of original work they'd planned.

But there's this out there as a testament:







...

We now turn to Freedom's Children.

Their first album is the most ludicrously overwrought thing since Nights in White Satin - a little album called, Battle Hymn of the Broken Hearted Horde. JOKES. But also pretty interesting.



(almost worth it just for the hilarious scots-south african accent)

Anway, that was 1968, and by 1970 things had gotten a lot heavier. 1970's album is called Astra. Which, right away, is a promising space-rock title...




Which leads into the next track, The Kid Came from Hazareth. Which flew afoul of the censors, until they cleverly replaced the 'N' with an 'H'...




And the final act, Galactic Vibes. A live album.







...

And I guess we could throw in Otis Waygood, while we're at it. Who I love to death. Not saffers, but from the neighbour, then-Rhodesia. And Rhodesia made South Africa look free and internationally popular... The boys from Bulawayo (then Salisbury/Harare, then Johannesburg) started in the mid-60s; snatches of foreign (US & UK) records in small, liable-to-be-raided-by-police-at-any-time clubs - I could probably just cut and paste that bit into everything I write in this thread, neh? - they eventually named themselves after an elevator. They appeared on (Rhodesian) TV in 1969 (South Africa didn't even have TV yet then!) and set off a nice "those damn kids and their sex and long hair and drugs" furor. As is proper. Anyway, after that they trekked it down to the Cape. They arrived at the end of summer, played for the beach crowd until the vacationing kids went home, and started back home. And then their car broke down in Joburg...

Mostly blues, where their heart always was, but some definitely psychedelic ventures from time to time.

The first single, 1970's Fever:




Three albums followed, before heavy-handed government oppression got too heavy handed (sound familiar?) and they took an illegal plane to Europe to dodge either jail time or the draft. Where they puttered about for a while before getting real jobs.

From the first, 1970's the Otis Waygood Blues Band - blues flute. Dig it.




Off the second set, 1971's Simply Otis Waygood. In the Sun:




The third album - 1972's Ten Light Claps and a Scream - is probably my favourite; the heaviest, for sure. So, then - Devil Bones:



Inexplicably, I couldn't find that track by its lonesome, so it is paired with Straight Ahead. I'm not sure why - the two tracks aren't next to each other on the album (Straight Ahead is track 2, Devil Bones is track 7) but whatever. I fucking love the saxophone in this (sax/bass doubling is a favourite trick of a friend of mine and me), which could be ten times as long before I got tired of it. Here it is by itself:




...

Most of all the aforementioned knew each other, by the way. It was a pretty damn small scene. South Africa and Rhodesia combined being home to only a couple million enfranchised people. The subset of punk-ass kids who followed underground English-language psych music was naturally that much smaller. So these people all played together, through 1969, 1970, and 1971. Most notably at South African Woodstock (aka Milner Park 1970).

Rock on, South Africa. Rock on.




(I realize now I forgot to mention Hawk and some others. Oh, well. There'll be a next time.)

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: