fantastic notions
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28-03-2014, 11:29 PM
fantastic notions
Is it responsible to encourage our children to embrace fantastic notions such as the afterlife?
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28-03-2014, 11:37 PM
RE: fantastic notions
(28-03-2014 11:29 PM)mknight Wrote:  Is it responsible to encourage our children to embrace fantastic notions such as the afterlife?

No

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28-03-2014, 11:47 PM
RE: fantastic notions
(28-03-2014 11:37 PM)Paranoidsam Wrote:  
(28-03-2014 11:29 PM)mknight Wrote:  Is it responsible to encourage our children to embrace fantastic notions such as the afterlife?

No
At long last we agree on something!
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29-03-2014, 05:00 AM
RE: fantastic notions
(28-03-2014 11:47 PM)mknight Wrote:  
(28-03-2014 11:37 PM)Paranoidsam Wrote:  No
At long last we agree on something!

Many people are predisposed to believe in an afterlife no matter what we do.
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29-03-2014, 05:19 AM
RE: fantastic notions
I tell my friends kids all sorts of crazy shit. They think Katy Perry lives next door to me but she is just super busy.
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29-03-2014, 07:36 AM
RE: fantastic notions
(28-03-2014 11:29 PM)mknight Wrote:  Is it responsible to encourage our children to embrace fantastic notions such as the afterlife?

No. Drinking Beverage

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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29-03-2014, 08:01 AM
RE: fantastic notions
No

Fixation on the afterlife causes a disconnect with reality. Why bother with this world when the next would be perfect?

The requirement of evidence to back your claim does not disappear because it hurts your feelings, reality does not care about your feefees.
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30-03-2014, 06:17 AM
RE: fantastic notions
(28-03-2014 11:29 PM)mknight Wrote:  Is it responsible to encourage our children to embrace fantastic notions such as the afterlife?

Absolutely not. I'm a proponent of what I like to call the responsible caretaker mentality. Children should understand that they have this world and this life for some time. But, that the world must be in working condition and in good order for the next wave of children, and those after, and those after. In a sense, the only right thing to do is to encourage children to embrace the fantastic notion of this life.

"The truth must dazzle gradually / or every man be blind." Emily Dickinson
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30-03-2014, 06:49 AM
RE: fantastic notions
Encourage? What is meant here? What are you proposing to do and say when fantastical subjects are raised by your children either from their own imagination or from exposure to others?

Children will come to various points in their lives where they are drawn to consider fantastical ideas. There is nothing to be gained by stamping down on this. Let them explore these ideas, and help them explore these ideas. Explain what different people around the world believe, and to the best of your ability explain why they believe such things. Ask the child to think about why people believe different things, and how they might figure out which if any are true. Such events are an opportunity to deal with issues of critical thinking that you might otherwise never cover appropriately with your child. Events such as these are not a threat to your predetermined ideas of what your children should think and believe.

My children are 8 and 5. My daughter has come to atheism through a process of critical thinking, but keeps an open mind to the possibility that she is wrong. My son independently came up with the idea of reincarnation and expects on his death that he will come back as a baby. I see neither of these ideas as a threat to what I think, or to what I think they should think. I feel that my daughter's position is highly appropriate considering her age. She has settled on it despite my telling her repeatedly that I don't think children are either theist or atheist, but must have enough time and exposure to ideas to come to their own opinion and to apply their own labels later on. She's more open to religious topics than I am, but is also less experienced. In my view she has an highly appropriate level of credulity. I'm confident my son will think more on the subject as he grows and learns and will come to many new positions and opinions along the way. When he has thought through the issues for himself and comes to care about what I think on the subject I'll be glad to tell him down to an appropriate level of detail.

I don't propose to tell my children what to think, nor to limit their intellect and imagination by putting them through quasi-religious indoctrination processes.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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30-03-2014, 10:26 PM
RE: fantastic notions
(30-03-2014 06:49 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Encourage? What is meant here? What are you proposing to do and say when fantastical subjects are raised by your children either from their own imagination or from exposure to others?

Children will come to various points in their lives where they are drawn to consider fantastical ideas. There is nothing to be gained by stamping down on this. Let them explore these ideas, and help them explore these ideas. Explain what different people around the world believe, and to the best of your ability explain why they believe such things. Ask the child to think about why people believe different things, and how they might figure out which if any are true. Such events are an opportunity to deal with issues of critical thinking that you might otherwise never cover appropriately with your child. Events such as these are not a threat to your predetermined ideas of what your children should think and believe.

My children are 8 and 5. My daughter has come to atheism through a process of critical thinking, but keeps an open mind to the possibility that she is wrong. My son independently came up with the idea of reincarnation and expects on his death that he will come back as a baby. I see neither of these ideas as a threat to what I think, or to what I think they should think. I feel that my daughter's position is highly appropriate considering her age. She has settled on it despite my telling her repeatedly that I don't think children are either theist or atheist, but must have enough time and exposure to ideas to come to their own opinion and to apply their own labels later on. She's more open to religious topics than I am, but is also less experienced. In my view she has an highly appropriate level of credulity. I'm confident my son will think more on the subject as he grows and learns and will come to many new positions and opinions along the way. When he has thought through the issues for himself and comes to care about what I think on the subject I'll be glad to tell him down to an appropriate level of detail.

I don't propose to tell my children what to think, nor to limit their intellect and imagination by putting them through quasi-religious indoctrination processes.
It's important to encourage children to explore various ideas but should we not provide guidance when these ideas are based on unverifiable assumptions?
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