is this a thing?
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29-04-2014, 10:14 AM (This post was last modified: 29-04-2014 10:18 AM by Hafnof.)
RE: is this a thing?
My son Mr 5 has nightmares most nights and comes to join us in our bed. Miss 8 still does so very occasionally, but they petered out for her somewhere around age 5-6. It would be nice to be able to get a full night's rest again. I look forward to improvement by Mr 5 in this area Smile

I don't know whether he doesn't want to talk to me about them or whether he can't remember them, but usually he keeps his mouth firmly shut about it all. He did tell me the other week that he dreamt about tigers eating the whole family.

My wife still gets nightmares maybe once a week or once every couple of weeks. I can't remember the last time I had a genuine nightmare. I am the master of my dream world.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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29-04-2014, 10:22 AM
RE: is this a thing?
(29-04-2014 10:14 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  My son Mr 5
...

Ohmy
You called your son, Mister Five?

No wonder the poor kid has nightmares! That's child abuse!

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29-04-2014, 10:59 AM
RE: is this a thing?
(29-04-2014 08:59 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  Are children more prone to nightmares than adults?
Good question!

I don't really know the answer, but it seems like ages ago since I had my last nightmare, I think about four years; which is not that much, I guess.

I don't mind nightmares, though; I wish I had them more often. Once, I woke up in the middle of one with enough time to write the core of it down. It eventually turned into a short fictional story that I still enjoy imagining.

Maybe you can write your children's nightmares down and turn them into stories.

Enjoy your (and/or their) nightmares! :-)
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29-04-2014, 11:18 AM
RE: is this a thing?
(29-04-2014 08:59 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  Are children more prone to nightmares than adults?

I clearly remember having many, many nightmares as a kid, but as I got older they diminished. And now, they are non-existent. I sometimes can remember my dreams, but they are just an amalgamation of wackiness and random events.

My son had a nightmare last night and he has them on a regular basis. Even my 2 year old daughter gets them, although she can't articulate what they are. She gets them most every night because we hear her crying in her sleep.

When my son climbed in my bed last night, I began to wonder about this.

In a word, yes, especially if the homelife is a stable one or mostly stable. Odd, but true. Little kids with real world issues tend to dream more positive.

Now all kids repress a lot of stuff they don't understand or that flies over their head. Often those repressed images (it can be anything an image or something they hear), come out in their dreams often as nightmares.

Kids who live with a higher than normal stress level, tend to dream more about overcoming obstacles or shutting down completely (which kind of falls in line with psychological tests done on dogs on forced helplessness), in other words the real world stuff they're exposed to, doesn't seem to manifest in dreams the way it can with other kids. Children with higher stresses are much more likely to develop nightmares when they're older.

Finally, and I'm just throwing this out there, sometimes young children become very used to waking during dreams. Sometimes the dreams aren't so bad, but the habit is established. The child wakes, climbs into the parents bed with the excuse that they had a bad dream. The truth might be they just feel anxious about something else entirely. But the dream becomes the excuse.

Another note...I do seem to recall that vivid dreams/night terrors tend to run in families.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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29-04-2014, 11:28 AM
RE: is this a thing?
http://kidshealth.org/parent/general/sle...tmare.html

HeartHeartHeart

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29-04-2014, 11:31 AM
RE: is this a thing?
I have always had nightmares. Even now.
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29-04-2014, 11:38 AM
RE: is this a thing?
I just thought of something. Isn't this Egor's area of expertise...dreams and all that? Tongue

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29-04-2014, 11:40 AM
RE: is this a thing?
This is a lot of interesting information. Thank you.

And yes, my son is already a master manipulator; however, QC and I are as well, so we see straight through it. I can tell when he's using an excuse to get something. He was genuinely scared last night.

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29-04-2014, 12:08 PM
RE: is this a thing?
Personally, I don't mind kids in the bed at night……it won't last forever. It stopped about age 6. They are only young once. Heart

I can give them reassurance and security just by being next to them. I find that a better solution than a child being too frightened to close their eyes. In the end, one brings peace to the child, the other fear (and a much more pleasant next day).

In our house, I don't care where you sleep, just lie down and shut up, and get your cold feet off me. Tongue Not so much anymore, but we used to play musical beds. A child would wander into our room, and (usually) my husband would get up and go sleep in the kids bed. Don't care where you sleep, just shhh!


YMMV


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29-04-2014, 04:17 PM
RE: is this a thing?
(29-04-2014 08:59 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  Are children more prone to nightmares than adults?

I clearly remember having many, many nightmares as a kid, but as I got older they diminished. And now, they are non-existent. I sometimes can remember my dreams, but they are just an amalgamation of wackiness and random events.

My son had a nightmare last night and he has them on a regular basis. Even my 2 year old daughter gets them, although she can't articulate what they are. She gets them most every night because we hear her crying in her sleep.

When my son climbed in my bed last night, I began to wonder about this.


Children tend to have far more active imaginations than adult do, so they can invent crazy scenarios in the back of their minds all the easier, and this can easy get out of hand so to speak when it comes to dreaming.

Chances are that the perceived incidences of nightmares decreases as a person ages; it would not surprise me if this was in direct relation to the development of the prefrontal cortex, which is commonly associated with rational thought and only finishes development around the mid-to-late 20's.

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