masculine, feminine and neuter in language
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19-11-2014, 05:08 AM
RE: masculine, feminine and neuter in language
(19-11-2014 04:59 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  
(18-11-2014 07:59 PM)The Polyglot Atheist Wrote:  Well "die" is both the feminine and plural article, for nominative and accusative, but that doesn't make the plural feminine. It's just plural.

Useful to know! Thanks.

Got any tips for figuring out what's accusative, dative and genitive in a sentence when talking? I've had it explained to me but it hasn't really sunk in enough to use it in practise.

I give my brother's apple to you.

I - nominative - subject

brother's - Genitive - possessive

apple - accusative - direct object

you - dative - indirect object



I am the one who does it - nominative

brother is the one who owns it - genitive

apple is the thing directly acted upon - accusative

you are the thing indirectly acted upon - dative

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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19-11-2014, 05:49 AM
RE: masculine, feminine and neuter in language
(19-11-2014 05:02 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(18-11-2014 07:59 PM)The Polyglot Atheist Wrote:  Why not? Tongue

Too many harsh sounds. But then, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

I like the sound of German. It's like fighting talk. It's exciting! It's probably the same reason why so many trekkies learn to speak Klingon instead of Vulcan.
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19-11-2014, 06:12 AM (This post was last modified: 19-11-2014 06:19 AM by The Polyglot Atheist.)
RE: masculine, feminine and neuter in language
Well, noun cases are usually subdivided into Direct cases and "Oblique" cases. Nominative, Accusative and sometimes Vocative are Direct cases, the rest are Oblique cases. I think the difference is that Direct cases have no use of prepositions, Oblique cases need prepositions (whether the language has actual cases or not). This is a very general description though.

Nominative is the subject, the agent.
Genitive can be used to indicate possession, among other things.
Dative is usually expressed as "to someone" (to is the keyword). English has a last remnant of this with whom. "According to whom?" that's a dative.
Accusative is the direct object.

Then you have additional cases that differ from languages. Latin has Ablative and Vocative, Russian has Instrumental and Prepositional, and so on.

Each case has multiple use but what also Dom said is the most common use for them. If you want to learn more about it, you can check the Wikipedia page for Grammatical cases.

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24-11-2014, 11:01 AM
RE: masculine, feminine and neuter in language
Apologies for talking almost three million years to reply but thanks for all the links Mathilda and thanks for the suggestion to watch Kinder Deutsch TV Dom and everyone else's replies.

No doubt I shall be revisiting here with some more questions at some point Smile

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I am a rock, I am the sky, the birds and the trees and everything beyond.
I am the wind, in the fields in which I roar. I am the water, in which I drown.
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