(near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
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01-05-2012, 10:54 AM
(near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
I wanted to put this topic here at health and psychology because I think that a lot of this is really made up.

Before I say what I wanna say, I would like to share some videos:









Now just a few thoughts of my own.
First of all, I do not question what these people saw. I am sure they did. What I question is, that it was what they think, and that they where really dead.
They where dieing and the brain went hyper, and I am pretty sure, that for whatever reason, this is what our brain does. Shows us pictures that we expect to see.

I had near death experiences twice. And I am sorry to say, but I saw nothing. I simply went calm and ready to die. No tunnel of light, no voices, nothing weird. Just complete calmness. This does not make me fear death or dieng like some might think. Some people might be scared of dieing or being dead because it is an unknown but so far I am not scared of it at all. But I am happy to know that the process of dieng is not to fear because you turn into a state of acceptance "so be it, I am dieng". For me there was no pain, although both times I was about to drown.
The same type of calmness and acceptance was in me when I was about to commit suicide. I just went there, ready to jump, mind empty "so be it, I am dieng". Well as you read my words you see I am not dead, but that's another story.
The point I am making is, the brain calms you down, one or the other way.

These people in the video "talked to god", other people see dead relatives waiting for them, others see the gates of heaven. But what everyone has in common (as far as I found out) is the fact, that they all where fine with being dead/dieing and did not want to "return".

What do you guys think? Had an experience like that? Did you see anything? Feel anything?

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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01-05-2012, 08:09 PM (This post was last modified: 01-05-2012 08:17 PM by Mr Woof.)
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
In Melbourne Australia, there is an organization known as VictorIANDES, The Victorian chapter for people claiming to have experienced near death experiences. They keep pretty much to themselves as people, even family tend to look on them as nutters.

Personally I have known three people, one very down to earth male atheist, who claims to have left his body when clinically dead ( this was affirmed by doctors) along with a lady Unity Church Minister, and another woman , both of whom were members of VictorIANDES.?Could be final bodily chemical changes; who knows?

I received some seemingly genuine medical literature from IANDES, some years ago relating to cases of organ transplantation citing various issues where the recipient developed strong personality traits formerly belonging to the donor. One example was of a quiet violin student whose body organ (can't remember which) was transplanted to a wild street kid who soon developed an interest in classical music. Another recipient woke screaming in the night to a loud bang......the donor had been shot. I imagine there are scientific theories and explanations and I never developed a strong interest in this area.

I once read a book... think the authors surname may have been Storm, where he claims to have died and was taken away by really ghoulish people who were sexually molesting him in the process....... Trouble viewing 1st video,from what I saw Freud would have loved it!
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01-05-2012, 08:31 PM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
Steve Job's last words were: "wow, wow, wow".

My husband's last words were: "I'm going to step outside now". He looked surprised. He knew that he was dying though, and I wonder what he was surprised about. After that he closed his eyes.

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02-05-2012, 06:11 AM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
I will openly admit that I am genuinely scared of death. The thought terrifies me and it's something I ponder constantly. But I use it. I use it to live my life.

What's good is that I no longer fear the possibility of going to a hell.

I am one of those people that will say that I wish I could live practically forever. The main reason is because I want to be here for all the discoveries. I want to know what's out there in the universe. I dream constantly of experiencing contact with another intelligent life-form.

Knowing that it's almost certain I won't be here to experience most of this makes me jealous.

But like I stated, I don't let the fear cripple me (I love snowboarding and I have family and friends that think I'm nuts). I use it as fuel.

“We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically.”

-Neil deGrasse Tyson
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02-05-2012, 07:05 AM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
(02-05-2012 06:11 AM)NoahsFarce Wrote:  I will openly admit that I am genuinely scared of death. The thought terrifies me and it's something I ponder constantly. But I use it. I use it to live my life.

What's good is that I no longer fear the possibility of going to a hell.

I am one of those people that will say that I wish I could live practically forever. The main reason is because I want to be here for all the discoveries. I want to know what's out there in the universe. I dream constantly of experiencing contact with another intelligent life-form.

Knowing that it's almost certain I won't be here to experience most of this makes me jealous.

But like I stated, I don't let the fear cripple me (I love snowboarding and I have family and friends that think I'm nuts). I use it as fuel.



Well, what are you afraid of, dying itself or missing out on things? These are two very different things.

My husband was not at all afraid of dying, but he was definitely pissed at missing out on things. Namely the outcome of personal projects and also world affairs. He was also upset that he couldn't be there for me anymore.

Death itself was not scary to him, leaving life was upsetting.

So which is it you are afraid of?

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Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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02-05-2012, 11:18 AM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
(02-05-2012 07:05 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(02-05-2012 06:11 AM)NoahsFarce Wrote:  I will openly admit that I am genuinely scared of death. The thought terrifies me and it's something I ponder constantly. But I use it. I use it to live my life.

What's good is that I no longer fear the possibility of going to a hell.

I am one of those people that will say that I wish I could live practically forever. The main reason is because I want to be here for all the discoveries. I want to know what's out there in the universe. I dream constantly of experiencing contact with another intelligent life-form.

Knowing that it's almost certain I won't be here to experience most of this makes me jealous.

But like I stated, I don't let the fear cripple me (I love snowboarding and I have family and friends that think I'm nuts). I use it as fuel.

As I alluded to previously though, this fear is not disabling to me. It's just another fear I live with.



Well, what are you afraid of, dying itself or missing out on things? These are two very different things.

My husband was not at all afraid of dying, but he was definitely pissed at missing out on things. Namely the outcome of personal projects and also world affairs. He was also upset that he couldn't be there for me anymore.

Death itself was not scary to him, leaving life was upsetting.

So which is it you are afraid of?
Death scares me because of the prospect of the party going on without me as Hitchens used to put it.

Death scares me in every possible way I suppose. I flat-out do not want to die.

Being this type of person that was in fact indoctrinated, it's pretty amazing that I didn't end up a devout.

“We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically.”

-Neil deGrasse Tyson
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02-05-2012, 11:39 AM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
(02-05-2012 11:18 AM)NoahsFarce Wrote:  
(02-05-2012 07:05 AM)Dom Wrote:  Well, what are you afraid of, dying itself or missing out on things? These are two very different things.

My husband was not at all afraid of dying, but he was definitely pissed at missing out on things. Namely the outcome of personal projects and also world affairs. He was also upset that he couldn't be there for me anymore.

Death itself was not scary to him, leaving life was upsetting.

So which is it you are afraid of?

Death scares me because of the prospect of the party going on without me as Hitchens used to put it.

Death scares me in every possible way I suppose. I flat-out do not want to die.

Being this type of person that was in fact indoctrinated, it's pretty amazing that I didn't end up a devout.


You are supposed to be afraid of death - that's the survival instinct. Instincts are instincts, although they do evolve and change and the use for some of them becomes obsolete to an extent.

Being afraid of dying should be pretty null and void since, barring unfortunate accidents, it is generally painfree today.

Not wanting to be dead is a sign of a zest for life and a good thing IMO. But not wanting to be dead is not like a fear, it's that it would piss you off to miss out on this, that, or the other thing.

The process of dying and the fact of non-existance are two seperate things. So you say both scare you?

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02-05-2012, 12:28 PM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
I say to myself, if I am able to worry about death, then I shouldn't be worrying about it. If I am able to worry, then my brain is functioning so therefore I'm alive. But if I'm dead well, I'm dead so I won't be able to worry.
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02-05-2012, 12:36 PM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
When my dad died his lady friend was with him, us kids were all home in our respective states miles away. So she related his last word to me.

Dad and his younger brother didn't get along partly because dad felt that his parents loved the younger brother more and he said that both were abusive to him but not his brother. There always seemed to be bad blood...not from my uncle to my dad but definitely from dad toward this brother.

The week before dad died we were all there to spend time with him and take care of things. My uncle called and said he and his son were on their way down after I let him know how far along things were. It was a long drive that they made through the night to get there. When I told dad they were coming he was mad...or appeared to be. He said he didn't want to see his brother...a lot of angry words. I made sure that the two of them had some time alone and I have never asked how that time went. It isn't my business.

Dad's last word was his brother's name.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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02-05-2012, 01:34 PM
RE: (near) death experiences, heaven, hell, nirvana
(02-05-2012 11:39 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(02-05-2012 11:18 AM)NoahsFarce Wrote:  Death scares me because of the prospect of the party going on without me as Hitchens used to put it.

Death scares me in every possible way I suppose. I flat-out do not want to die.

Being this type of person that was in fact indoctrinated, it's pretty amazing that I didn't end up a devout.


You are supposed to be afraid of death - that's the survival instinct. Instincts are instincts, although they do evolve and change and the use for some of them becomes obsolete to an extent.

Being afraid of dying should be pretty null and void since, barring unfortunate accidents, it is generally painfree today.

Not wanting to be dead is a sign of a zest for life and a good thing IMO. But not wanting to be dead is not like a fear, it's that it would piss you off to miss out on this, that, or the other thing.

The process of dying and the fact of non-existance are two seperate things. So you say both scare you?
You're right, I need to reevaluate my thoughts on the matter.

Alright, how about this:

The thought of death terrifies me, but what's most disconcerting is that I won't be able to experience literally everything this world has to offer in way of knowledge. I am scared at the prospect that I might not be around to see my children grow up.

Okay, so death terrifies me and the thought that I won't be around forever to experience things like discovery of life on other worlds sucks. I'm scared that I might die before my children grow up.

“We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe atomically.”

-Neil deGrasse Tyson
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