popularity of US beer in the UK!
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19-10-2016, 05:25 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
It really has nothing to do with how good a beer really is.

..........

When I was a kid -- they didn't sell Coors east of the Mississippi. Anyone who went out west always bought some and dragged it back.

I never thought it was anything great. It tastes like watery Strohs......

Big deal.....

Everybody thinks "the good stuff" has to come from somewhere else..........

......

.......................................

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19-10-2016, 05:25 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
(18-10-2016 07:58 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I had to cut my reply short earlier because I don't like to interfere with my antivirus software (and it just closes all the intertubes anyway, if I close it when it is running). Dodgy I don't generally drink beers from Germany here in the US, because they don't seem to survive the trip without getting skunky. The exception would be some German beer I had at a bar in Glendale, CA, called "The Red Lion". They had a beer on draft which I think was called "Dortmunder Ritterbrau". Best beer ever. Nice bachelor party. Thumbsup Of course, that was 30+ YA. The flavor could have changed, in the interim.

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19-10-2016, 08:07 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
(19-10-2016 03:00 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  In London there used to be a pub group that had micro breweries in the actual pubs. The Lewisham one was the Fox & Firkin, I think there was a Goose & Firkin as well. I think one of the favourite brews was called Dog Wobbler.

That was in the 70s, seems the F&F is still going, but cleaned up now, civilised Weeping. Used to have board floors, second hand sofas and a bashed up upright piano that anyone who could play could play. Good, often rude, sing songs! Great atmosphere!

Correction, it was "Dogbolter" ale. History of the breweries.

Added: think "Dog Wobbler" sounds like a good name for an ale! There are great ales and beers available in Gloucester.

I used to frequent the Fleece and Firkin in Bristol which was actually located in an old wool warehouse. they used to sell T-Shirts emblazoned with, "Wool Ewe Baalieve It?" and "For Flocks Sake What are You Firkin Drinking?"

Great place. The Dogbolter was sold in half pints only and tasted more like a barley wine than a beer.

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19-10-2016, 08:21 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
(19-10-2016 08:07 AM)Silly Deity Wrote:  
(19-10-2016 03:00 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  In London there used to be a pub group that had micro breweries in the actual pubs. The Lewisham one was the Fox & Firkin, I think there was a Goose & Firkin as well. I think one of the favourite brews was called Dog Wobbler.

That was in the 70s, seems the F&F is still going, but cleaned up now, civilised Weeping. Used to have board floors, second hand sofas and a bashed up upright piano that anyone who could play could play. Good, often rude, sing songs! Great atmosphere!

Correction, it was "Dogbolter" ale. History of the breweries.

Added: think "Dog Wobbler" sounds like a good name for an ale! There are great ales and beers available in Gloucester.

I used to frequent the Fleece and Firkin in Bristol which was actually located in an old wool warehouse. they used to sell T-Shirts emblazoned with, "Wool Ewe Baalieve It?" and "For Flocks Sake What are You Firkin Drinking?"

Great place. The Dogbolter was sold in half pints only and tasted more like a barley wine than a beer.

That last is 'cos, traditionally, barley whine is actually an ale! Ales were brewed without those foreign hop things originally, just fermented, malted barley. The more malt the sweeter the brew. But maybe weaker than midern ales because you had to stop the yeast converting all the sugars, thus less alcohol (unless you blended different brews).

The Lewisham slogan was, "For Fox sake give me a Firkin beer!". You reminded me...

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19-10-2016, 08:28 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
My fave is and probably will always be unfiltered Hefeweizen.

Gin - don't like it.

And then, when they add fruit flavors to hard liquor here - wtf do they add sugar?

I grew up with all kinds of liquor that was based on fruit - and not sugar!

Good Slivovitz is a fave there.

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19-10-2016, 08:48 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
(19-10-2016 05:25 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  
(18-10-2016 07:58 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I had to cut my reply short earlier because I don't like to interfere with my antivirus software (and it just closes all the intertubes anyway, if I close it when it is running). Dodgy I don't generally drink beers from Germany here in the US, because they don't seem to survive the trip without getting skunky. The exception would be some German beer I had at a bar in Glendale, CA, called "The Red Lion". They had a beer on draft which I think was called "Dortmunder Ritterbrau". Best beer ever. Nice bachelor party. Thumbsup Of course, that was 30+ YA. The flavor could have changed, in the interim.

Went belly up 10y ago Lecture_preist

That would explain why I haven't been able to find it. When I did, the bottled beer was not as good as the draft.
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21-10-2016, 02:25 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
(18-10-2016 05:55 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  I know this subject is a bit cliche and hipsterish but I've noticed that in Britain since I started drinking when I was 18 it was common for most people to ridicule American breweries & beers (we have a kind of banter-like supremacist mentality about most things anyway, naturally). Though recently I've noticed American beers and breweries have been getting noticed alot in the UK! They are making some fantastic beers. Most people are beginning to agree.

I recently got a beer named "Gamma-ray" which came in a can that said "American pale ale" on the front. The brewery that made this beer is called Beavertown and is based in London. So I'm wondering, why does it have American pale ale on the front of the can if it's brewed in London? Is it simply just an American style beer?

As others have stated, yes, it's a style.

For the past few decades American craft-brews are on the rise, and I think those are being exported more these days more than ever. In the past our primary beer exports, I imagine, have been our cheapest beers, like Budweiser, Schlitz, Miller, Natural Ice.

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22-10-2016, 02:47 AM
RE: popularity of US beer in the UK!
Not a fan of the American stuff myself. I usually stick to European beers - particularly German. But I rarely drink these days.
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