(silent) atheism in the workplace
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25-04-2013, 06:42 PM
(silent) atheism in the workplace
My boss is moving to a different department in our company. I sat down with him at his desk earlier this week. We talked about my future, among other things. He asked if I had ever thought of applying for a position in management. (He's already told me who he recommended to take his place, so I know he didn't mean it that way.) I told him I'd thought of it passively, but I didn't really know how to go about doing it. He said I show a lot of dedication and creativity in my work, but I need to work on networking. I told him I agree. He suggested that I try to socialize with the area managers in our building. I asked for some suggestions on how to get their attention:

"Well, if it's M--- you're talking to, you should just mention Jesus. That'll stop him dead in his tracks. He'll talk to you for an hour."

"Oh. Okay."

"Just mention guns if you want to talk to talk to J---."

"Is there anything else?" (...you know, other than praise the Lord and pass the ammunition?)

"I'll let you know if I think of anything, but those two will probably work the best."

I'm sure he just recommended guns and Jesus because those are some common interests that he shares with them. I'm sure there are other things I could find to say to them, but I wish I could cash in on some of that Christian brotherhood. I'm not going to fake it for everyone I know at work, but it's tempting. It's all too easy to be an internet atheist, but it's something else entirely to have the courage of your convictions.
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26-04-2013, 11:36 AM
RE: (silent) atheism in the workplace
(25-04-2013 06:42 PM)cbb2274 Wrote:  My boss is moving to a different department in our company. I sat down with him at his desk earlier this week. We talked about my future, among other things. He asked if I had ever thought of applying for a position in management. (He's already told me who he recommended to take his place, so I know he didn't mean it that way.) I told him I'd thought of it passively, but I didn't really know how to go about doing it. He said I show a lot of dedication and creativity in my work, but I need to work on networking. I told him I agree. He suggested that I try to socialize with the area managers in our building. I asked for some suggestions on how to get their attention:

"Well, if it's M--- you're talking to, you should just mention Jesus. That'll stop him dead in his tracks. He'll talk to you for an hour."

"Oh. Okay."

"Just mention guns if you want to talk to talk to J---."

"Is there anything else?" (...you know, other than praise the Lord and pass the ammunition?)

"I'll let you know if I think of anything, but those two will probably work the best."

I'm sure he just recommended guns and Jesus because those are some common interests that he shares with them. I'm sure there are other things I could find to say to them, but I wish I could cash in on some of that Christian brotherhood. I'm not going to fake it for everyone I know at work, but it's tempting. It's all too easy to be an internet atheist, but it's something else entirely to have the courage of your convictions.

Sounds like your boss is a dick and the company will be better off without him. These people probably have interest other than God and bullets. I would, first, continue the good work you are obviously doing, then try to find those other interests. I would tread lightly with my athiest beliefs though, because companies have an image to protect. Good luck! All athiests face these prejudices.
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26-04-2013, 01:32 PM
RE: (silent) atheism in the workplace
Quote:Sounds like your boss is a dick and the company will be better off without him. These people probably have interest other than God and bullets. I would, first, continue the good work you are obviously doing, then try to find those other interests. I would tread lightly with my athiest beliefs though, because companies have an image to protect. Good luck! All athiests face these prejudices.

I don't think he's a dick. I think he just imagined it was a safe assumption that I'm religious. This is a small southern town. We have churches in this town on almost every street. There are now crowds actively persecuting me with torches and pitchforks. The prejudice is much more nuanced than that. He genuinely wants to help me and I respect him.

Bigotry is often more nuanced than the kind portrayed in corny Hollywood movies about the civil rights movement. Many people just assume the next person is like them or at least wants to be like them.

I appreciate the spirit of what you're saying though. Thanks for your support.
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26-04-2013, 01:35 PM
RE: (silent) atheism in the workplace
Well...his advice is good, just not his suggested conversation starters. Trying finding out through other co-workers what else they are interested in.

“Science is simply common sense at its best, that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.”
—Thomas Henry Huxley
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