the Aurora
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28-07-2016, 05:30 AM
the Aurora
One of them most beautiful natural wonders found on this earth. A great view in a time laps from the International space station. http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-28...se/7668540

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28-07-2016, 05:38 AM
RE: the Aurora
How many people here have actually seen one, for reals. Sad not me

Theism is to believe what other people claim, Atheism is to ask "why should I".
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28-07-2016, 05:58 AM
RE: the Aurora
I went up in the hills outside of Kodiak Alaska one clear winter night -- after a solar flare.... A group of us took our girlfriends out and had a party on the snow.....

We put down tarps and sleeping bags -- dropped acid -- drank beer, smoked some weed and made out - while watching the light show.....

We all agreed -- we could actually HEAR the shit......

Probably just the acid kicking in...

Big Grin

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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28-07-2016, 04:25 PM
RE: the Aurora
(28-07-2016 05:38 AM)sporehux Wrote:  How many people here have actually seen one, for reals. Sad not me

Saw it the first time when I was 4. Dad saw that they were extremely active that night and woke me from a sound sleep. Ruined fireworks for me forever. May have been the moment I became an atheist too. The miracles and wonders of organized religion don't hold a candle to that.

You odds of seeing one aren't great. We're heading toward solar minimum and it's predicted to be a deep one. You can improve those odds by keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com. Many people miss them because the simply don't know that they're there.

Other than that try the north (55 degrees North or better) in September. You'll get a bit below freezing but it's quite survivable and the equinoxes are prime time for aurora.

---
Flesh and blood of a dead star, slain in the apocalypse of supernova, resurrected by four billion years of continuous autocatalytic reaction and crowned with the emergent property of sentience in the dream that the universe might one day understand itself.
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28-07-2016, 04:32 PM
RE: the Aurora
(28-07-2016 05:58 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  I went up in the hills outside of Kodiak Alaska one clear winter night -- after a solar flare.... A group of us took our girlfriends out and had a party on the snow.....

We put down tarps and sleeping bags -- dropped acid -- drank beer, smoked some weed and made out - while watching the light show.....

We all agreed -- we could actually HEAR the shit......

Probably just the acid kicking in...

Big Grin

There's a good chance that you actually did hear them. A sort of swishing sound? Cold still night?

Widely reported for decades, astronomers remained skeptical until they were finally recorded just a few years back. You shouldn't be able to hear them, auroras originate ~300 km up and at the speed of sound it'd take a while to reach you, especially as the air is pretty thin up there. Turns out the sound comes from a charged layer building up in thermal inversions in the lower atmosphere, typically ~100 m up. Same radiation that makes the auroras makes a zip and zap not far above your head.

---
Flesh and blood of a dead star, slain in the apocalypse of supernova, resurrected by four billion years of continuous autocatalytic reaction and crowned with the emergent property of sentience in the dream that the universe might one day understand itself.
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28-07-2016, 04:39 PM
RE: the Aurora
In Minnesnowta as I kid we used to see it quite often. Usually in the winter if I remember rightly.
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28-07-2016, 04:51 PM
RE: the Aurora
Sometime in the first half of the 70s when I was in high school I saw them from the back yard of a friend's house. Her parents made sure to gather Nick, her younger brother, and me to go our into their yard to watch what we were able to witness from eastern Iowa.

We sat in the yard and enjoyed the show for quite a while. I was struck by the beauty and by the fact that my friend's parents were so eager to share the experience with us...that was unlike anything I experienced with my parents. It was a unique time all around.

I have never seen the aurora since but have never forgotten that night. Smile

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF

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28-07-2016, 07:01 PM
RE: the Aurora
(28-07-2016 04:32 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  
(28-07-2016 05:58 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  I went up in the hills outside of Kodiak Alaska one clear winter night -- after a solar flare.... A group of us took our girlfriends out and had a party on the snow.....

We put down tarps and sleeping bags -- dropped acid -- drank beer, smoked some weed and made out - while watching the light show.....

We all agreed -- we could actually HEAR the shit......

Probably just the acid kicking in...

Big Grin

There's a good chance that you actually did hear them. A sort of swishing sound? Cold still night?

Widely reported for decades, astronomers remained skeptical until they were finally recorded just a few years back. You shouldn't be able to hear them, auroras originate ~300 km up and at the speed of sound it'd take a while to reach you, especially as the air is pretty thin up there. Turns out the sound comes from a charged layer building up in thermal inversions in the lower atmosphere, typically ~100 m up. Same radiation that makes the auroras makes a zip and zap not far above your head.

To the best of my recollection -- and remember - some serious drugs were involved ----- it was a very low frequency rumbling - and what I can only say sounded like the world's largest whisk broom, wielded by a giant...................... It came and went -- and we were all too giggly and stupid (and not to mention just a bit horny) to keep quiet and really listen much.... There was some occasional crackling sounds as well....

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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28-07-2016, 07:50 PM
RE: the Aurora
flying at 12,000 feet over North Dakota on a clear winter night. Saw the aurora, and the milky way looked like a solid band of stars so far away from city lights.
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28-07-2016, 09:06 PM
RE: the Aurora
(28-07-2016 07:01 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  
(28-07-2016 04:32 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  There's a good chance that you actually did hear them. A sort of swishing sound? Cold still night?

Widely reported for decades, astronomers remained skeptical until they were finally recorded just a few years back. You shouldn't be able to hear them, auroras originate ~300 km up and at the speed of sound it'd take a while to reach you, especially as the air is pretty thin up there. Turns out the sound comes from a charged layer building up in thermal inversions in the lower atmosphere, typically ~100 m up. Same radiation that makes the auroras makes a zip and zap not far above your head.

To the best of my recollection -- and remember - some serious drugs were involved ----- it was a very low frequency rumbling - and what I can only say sounded like the world's largest whisk broom, wielded by a giant...................... It came and went -- and we were all too giggly and stupid (and not to mention just a bit horny) to keep quiet and really listen much.... There was some occasional crackling sounds as well....

Whisk broom is how a lot of people who have heard them describe it. That and the crackling sounds.

I haven't heard of the low frequency rumbling. That may have been the acid. Or it might have been something peculiar to your situation.

Sadly, I haven't heard them myself. Seen them many times now but never heard.

---
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